Technology in Schools
9 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rebecca Hanley
Scoop.it!

Classroom Behavior? There's an App for That

Classroom Behavior? There's an App for That | Technology in Schools | Scoop.it
The school year is over! Yeah!

But as you know, teachers' minds immediately turn to what we can do differently next year. Considering the fact that classroom management is one of the biggest challen
Rebecca Hanley's insight:

This blog post on Edutopia explores a program/app called ClassDojo. The teacher who wrote this post stated this program considerably helped manage student behavior in her classroom. This program is both apple and android compatible as it can be accessed on a laptop, desktop, smartboard, and smartphone.  The program allows students to create their own avatars and from there teachers can award positive or negative points for behavior. This teacher found it more beneficial to limit the number of negative Dojos showing when a student losing a point its extremely serious.  She also felt giving them more positive points was boosting moral and behavior.  At the end of the quarter the teacher would allow her students with the most points to shop at the five-dollar prize store she created in her classroom. ClassDojo has many other benefits other than providing students with immediate feedback on their behavior.  Parents can also see reports and stay in the loop regarding their child’s behavior. ClassDojo also allows teacher to look for trends and see what it not working and what is working in the classroom. This saves teachers time as all the information is stored in one place and ClassDojo points out the trends for you.

 

I was so excited when I found this article because ClassDojo was used throughout my cooperating school.  Not only did classroom teachers use it, but as students moved to specials such as gym and music, those teachers could pull up ClassDojo as well.  First hand, I can tell you how hard students try to earn points and how much they love it. As mentioned in the article, just the sound of the positive or negative Dojo can draw the class’s attention. While reading the post I noticed two major differences between the school written about in the post  and my own cooperating school.  First, I like how this teacher did not hand out as many negative Dojos.  In the classroom I observed, handing out negative Dojos was somewhat of a common practice and not only did it upset kids but it hindered their educational process and discouraged them from engaging in their world, more so than the problem behavior that caused the negative Dojo.  I believe I would adopt a similar to approach as the teacher writing the blog post. However, in my cooperating school students were allowed to use their Dojos as a currency at the school store.  I like this better than the system in the article because it allows all students to be rewarded for their good behavior and hard work, not just the select students who had the highest amount of points.  This way, all students are motivated to work for Dojos even if they have a lower number compared to the rest of the class. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Hanley
Scoop.it!

Khan Academy: The future of education?

With the backing of Gates and Google, Khan Academy and its free online educational videos are moving into the classroom and across the world. Their goal: to ...
Rebecca Hanley's insight:

This 60 Minutes explores what Bill Gates labels as the “Future of Education”. Khan Academy is a digital classroom ran by Salman Khan, a graduate of MIT and Harvard Business School. Khan records lessons composed of his voice and his colorful sketches. He then uploads the lessons to this website where he has more than 40 million pupils every month. He has created lessons starting with basic addition and working his way up to advanced calculus. Other lessons include physics, biology, astronomy, history, and medicine. The interesting part of his lesson, he never presents himself. Khan claims if he showed his face in the lesson, his students would not be able to focus on the content. The mission of Khanacademy is this: “to provide a free world class education to anyone, anywhere”. Khan has now hired staff and they have created offices where they work to better Khanacademy. This method was tested in a school and you can see the differences in teaching styles immediately.  There are no textbooks or teachers, just Khan lectures. But, if students are stuck they can get one-on-one help with the teacher.

 

Honestly, as an aspiring teacher, these types of innovations really scare me.  What if teachers become unnecessary? Although I see this is not entirely possible yet as teachers help children if they are confused or don’t understand, what if it get’s to that point? As seen in the TED talk we watched in class, the School in the Clouds did not need teachers, rather nurturing adults that encouraged the students. As technology progresses I do grow more scared that teachers will become irrelevant one day.  But, then I remember arguments that were presented in “Technology in the Classroom: Friend or Foe?”. One of the main arguments presented in that article was teachers are essential to student’s success.  Although teacher’s may be phased out as online lectures become more popular I do not think it will be during my life time.  Also, there will always be a need for someone to create the lessons and online lectures so maybe that’s what the new teaching career will entail. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Hanley
Scoop.it!

Technology in the Classroom: Friend or Foe?

Technology in the Classroom: Friend or Foe? | Technology in Schools | Scoop.it
Does technology provide our students with experience they need to succeed in the 21st century, or does it hinder them from developing valuable skills that are only attainable through human interaction?
Rebecca Hanley's insight:

This article from the Huffington Post provides both the pros and cons of having technology integrated into education.  There is not doubt technology has changed education thus far for both teachers and students, but has it been for better or for worse? One approach views technology as the key to success.  Some schools believe in providing students with a computer and allowing them to guide their own learning or become self-directed learners. Other benefits to technology in education include the familiarity students develop as they need to know how to navigate technology to succeed in the real world, the connections developed and maintained by contact through technology, and the motivation that technology causes when lessons are integrated with computers and other technologies. On the completely opposite side of the spectrum, some schools promote hand son learning allows students to develop the intellectual, emotional, and spiritual skills they need. Some schools do not allow any computers in the classroom and discourage the use of them at home.  This perspective takes on the belief that learning comes from interactions between teachers and peers; technology just provides a distraction.  Other arguments against technology in education include it hinders the communication process between humans, it does not allow children to develop socialization skills they will need later in life as adults, and teachers are essential to student’s development and their ability to succeed.

 

Although my other Scoop.It posts and insights have focused on the benefits of technology in education and the classroom, I can really see how it can hinder the academic process as well.  However, I still entirely agree with the statement I previously made about technology engaging students and allowing them to express themselves. I think there is a thin line educators walk as to where the technology has to stop.  For example, what if students only communicate through technology, texting, chat rooms, etc. When they go for an interview in person as an adult will they be able to sustain a conversation? This also contributes to the problem with cyberbullying, students can sit behind their computer and torment their peers without having to see the repercutions. As mentioned in the SMARTboard article, the teacher only used the SMARTboard three to four times a week.  I think it’s crucial to work in other lessons and time in the classroom to promote socialization and communication.  Without a good balance of both, students in our society today will grow up attached to computer screens unable to interact face to face.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Hanley
Scoop.it!

Maryland Teacher Technology Standards

Rebecca Hanley's insight:

In order to ensure teachers in Maryland are using technology correctly and beneficially,  the Maryland Technology Consortium has developed the Maryland Teacher Technology Standards that include technology outcomes and indicators that all teachers will need to have completed before graduation from their education program.  There are seven standards to explore a variety of topics such as communication, legal, social, and ethical issues, integration of technology, assistive technology, and professional growth.

 

Before taking Universal Design for Learning, a class offered at the University of Maryland, I never knew these standards existed. But, when I did review them I realized I am already doing these things in a number of my classes. For example, Standard II: Communication states, “Use technology effectively and appropriately to interact electronically. Use technology to communicate information in a variety of formats.” Just in EDCI280 alone, I have completed that goal this semester. By using the discussion board, Pinterest, Twitter, and even Scoop.It I have used technology to communicate with my peers through a variety of technology mediums. Although I feel many students and maybe even professors are not aware of these standards, I think it’s important they do exist because as teachers we should be informed and briefed on technology that may be used in our classroom.  Even if you believe in teacher’s using technology in the classroom or not, it is important to acknowledge it does exist and be prepared to use it if you must. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Hanley
Scoop.it!

27 Good iPad Apps for Elementary School Students

27 Good iPad Apps for Elementary School Students | Technology in Schools | Scoop.it
As the new school year starts many teachers and their students will have iPads at their disposal for the first time. If you're one of those teachers getting iPads in your classroom for the first ti...
Rebecca Hanley's insight:

As more and more schools are receiving iPads, it is crucial to find apps that are both engaging and beneficial for students. This article focuses on twenty-seven apps suggested for elementary school students. Apps listed include programs that explore digital storytelling, math lessons, science lessons, and social studies lessons.

 

While first scrolling through the apps at glance I noticed many of them cost money.  Although I think if the app is worth the investment teachers should purchase it, I wondered where did this money come from? Do teachers have to provide their own personal funds to buy apps for these iPads or does the school allocate money for that? I think it’d be interesting to look for free apps and see if there really is a difference in quality and material between the apps that cost $3.99 and the free ones. One aspect of the iPad I am extremely interested is it’s effect on students and reading.  First, I think it’s wonder that apps like “Collins Big Cat Apps” have the ability to let the child read the story to themselves or have it narrated for them.  This entirely solves the problem for a child who does not have access to adults who have time to read to them, a practice researchers know improves reading.  Going off that, children can have access to adult reading at any time of the day not just when someone is available.  On a different note, I think students will be more interested in reading and engaged with stories on the iPad that are interactive.  Having the ability to create their own stories with pictures and voiceovers, like “Little Story Maker” will make reading and writing so much more fun for children.  I think the iPad has only just begun to change education and I cannot wait to see where it takes us.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Hanley
Scoop.it!

Whole Group Kindergarten Reading Lesson Smartboard

Rebecca Hanley's insight:

In this YouTube video we see a teacher leading a SMARTboard lesson plan with a class of elementary school students.  Students are first encouraged to recognize rhymes in the text on the SMARTboard. One boy was chosen to come and highlight the rhyme within the text.  Here we see the use of different colors to highlight the different rhyme pairs.  Next, the students are asked to come up and traffic light where a sight word is then displayed and the student has to read it. A number of students get to come up to the SMARTboard and choice a circle. The teacher did not describe the last lesson but you hear the students yelling and going “ooooooh!” and “woooow”.

 

Throughout this video the one thing I could not stop noticing was the students eagerness to participate and learn.  Even when it wasn’t a students turn to go up to the SMARTboard they eagerly awaited to see what their peer would chose, in turn looking at the sight words as they appeared.  As someone who has worked with a student trying to learn sight words, this is a much more exciting way that makes children want to learn.  Rather than just flashing index cards, students are encouraged to get up, walk up, and use their body to select sight words.  Using the SMARTboard allows teachers to appeal to all types of different learners such as bodily kinesthetic and visual.  To improve this lesson, the teacher could provide a voice over that said the word after the student identified it to help auditory learners.  In this video we see all the benefits mentioned in the “Goodbye chalkboard, hello SMARTboard” article. Students are simply ecstatic to participate in this lesson and I believe their performance will improve because of it. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebecca Hanley
Scoop.it!

Goodbye chalkboard, hello SMARTboard

Goodbye chalkboard, hello SMARTboard | Technology in Schools | Scoop.it
CARLISLE — The days of students hesitating to come up to the chalkboard are ancient history in this school district.
Rebecca Hanley's insight:

This article discussed how much both teachers and students adore the new technology being intergraded into their classrooms, “SMARTboard”. The SMARTboard is connected to a computer screen allowing teachers and students to interact with documents, presentations, YouTube, Music, the Internet, and graphic organizers.  The SMARTboard is great because encourages students to participate and engage in learning.  This new technology allows students to learn through a medium they are familiar with—technology and computers.  The SMARTboard is something students are comfortable with and it keeps their attention. One teacher described her classroom saying students were,”begging to come to the front of the class to participate in the activity. With this increase in engagement, teachers are seeing an improvement in performance as well. From a student’s point of view, the SMARTboard allows them to create their own personal twist on the material they are learning.  When doing a presentation a student said the SMARTboard is “more than just a piece of paper”. With the SMARTboard students can showcase both their knowledge and creativity at the same time.

 

I found this article about the SMARTboard reminding me of the insight I provided about the article regarding the iPad apps for elementary school.  As we can see here, another form of technology is allowing students to be more engaged in their learning and in turn improving their performance scores.  As an aspiring teacher I am eager to take a class where I learn to not only navigate the use of a SMARTboard, but how to create lesson plans for a SMARTboard and how to actively use it in my classroom.  What I found so refreshing about this article was teachers, even veterans, were open to the use of technology in their classrooms. I find it extremely disheartening when I see teachers swear off technology when it is clearly something the students enjoy and can relate to.  I think if used correctly, education can only be bettered by the use of technology, especially SMARTboards.

more...
No comment yet.