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Innovative Ideas for Using Google Forms

Innovative Ideas for Using Google Forms | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
Home Page of followmolly.com

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Tom Walton's insight:

Some of the amazing things you (and your learners!) can do with Google Forms (... and then there are presentations, documents, all of which can be shared, etc., etc.)

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Alenka Andrin's curator insight, March 17, 2014 3:45 PM

Examples of Using Google Forms in education.

Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, February 7, 1:22 PM

Différentes façons d'utiliser google form : des idées très intéressantes à utiliser. 

Anabela Luís's curator insight, February 10, 6:02 AM

Muito bom para quem usa formulários do Google ou quer aprender a usar.

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Five Fantastic Film sites for ELT

Five Fantastic Film sites for ELT | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
Using video in the classroom is a great way to engage learners in the material, either from a topic perspective or with a particular language point.  Young learners in particular seem to love the m...

Via TeachingEnglish
Tom Walton's insight:

Some sites to bookmark! Film-English.com is especially good.

 

See also https://viralelt.wordpress.com/

 

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Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, March 10, 11:29 PM

Using film or video in the classroom can be very engaging for students, whether they are watching or making the film/video.  It can be very empowering for students in the creating process.

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There’s No "I" in Teacher: 8 Rules of Thumb for Collaborative Planning

There’s No "I" in Teacher: 8 Rules of Thumb for Collaborative Planning | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
Teachers become learning designers when given the space to collaborate by (among other things) cultivating trust, keeping it simple, and ensuring that it's student relevant.
Tom Walton's insight:

Interesting even if you don't "game", or believe in "gamification". We should collaborate more on "designing" curriculum!

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Making The Shift To Mobile-First Teaching

Making The Shift To Mobile-First Teaching | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
TEST
Making The Shift To Mobile-First Teaching
by Terry Heick
This is part 1 of a 3-part series on Mobile Teaching
The Big Idea Of Mobile Teaching
Changing the terms, spaces, and timing of learning by using mobile technology.
Tom Walton's insight:

Interesting... though does mobile actually change the fact that it ought to be learner-first, not technology-first?

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abeer bakhsh's curator insight, April 12, 11:54 AM

its a great  ways of teaching nowadays.

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BBC Learning English's Tongue Twister Challenge - YouTube

Learning tongue twisters is a great way of improving your pronunciation. Watch Finn and Rob do battle to find out who has the quickest tongue in town and the...
Tom Walton's insight:

Fun, a challenge, great for pronunciation, for losing your FEAR of making English sounds, great for warmers... Tongue twisters are so great for use in class.

 

Love the idea of a one-on-one challenge like this.

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Look Up

Look Up | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
This EFL lesson is designed around a short film and poem by Gary Turk and the theme of isolation caused by the use of new technology. Students watch a short film with no sound and speculate about t...
Tom Walton's insight:

Film-English.com: probably  THE best website for ELT lessons on the internet.

 

Every clip chosen a joy, every lesson a winner!

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6 Ways Teachers Respond To Education Technology

6 Ways Teachers Respond To Education Technology | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
TEST 6 Ways Teachers Respond To Education Technology
by TeachThought Staff
The Backstory of the Pencil Metaphor
If you’re looking for the 6 ways part–well, hold your horses; first, a little backstory.
Tom Walton's insight:

Nice metaphor! Where are YOU on that pencil?!

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Why do so many Moodle courses suck?

Why do so many Moodle courses suck? | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it

'd Moodle is a magnificent free product and has the potential to enable schools and teachers to build wonderfully unique interactive online learning courses in which learner interaction can be tracked, measured and responded to.

Tom Walton's insight:

Moodle itself sucks -- that's a huge part of the problem: if you want a decent blog, or chat function, or a wiki for your learners, you have to step outside Moodle.

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How To Use Microsoft OneDrive

How To Use Microsoft OneDrive | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
TEST How To Use Microsoft OneDrive 
by TeachThought Staff
Google dominates the cloud.
Tom Walton's insight:

Nice intro to OneDrive, a good cloud storage alternative to Google Drive if you MUST have Word and PowerPoint rather than the Google alternatives.

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10 Exciting Ways to Use Mobile Phones In the Classroom Infographic | e-Learning Infographics

10 Exciting Ways to Use Mobile Phones In the Classroom Infographic | e-Learning Infographics | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
The 10 Exciting Ways to Use Mobile Phones In the Classroom Infographic presents 10 tips to create a conducive learning environment with the use of mobility.

Via Luísa Lima
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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 26, 2014 11:45 PM

Utilizar los celulares en el aula de manera inteligente.

Rocio Watkins's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:30 AM

These are great ideas to make BYOD work every day. 

N Kaspar's curator insight, July 2, 2014 4:39 AM

Practical & effective suggestions that would work in a classroom or other learning situations.

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What Technology Does What: An #edtech Chart For Teachers

What Technology Does What: An #edtech Chart For Teachers | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
TEST What Technology Does What: The Ultimate #edtech Chart For Teachers by TeachThought Staff Okay, we’ve had this post half-finished for long enough that some of the apps we had here are no longer relevant, so we figured it was probably time to go...
Tom Walton's insight:

Good place to discover "other" tools you might well not know about!

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Great things found in 60 seconds on The Guardian : Tech ELT Blog

Great things found in 60 seconds on The Guardian : Tech ELT Blog | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
... Wednesday With a class of learners interested in cookery, the user-submitted photos of Your favourite comfort food is a great starting point for discussion and/or on-going project work: can they take and share (think Edmodo!
Tom Walton's insight:

The Guardian: I get more material from it for class than from any other resource.

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8 Tips for an Awesome Prezi


Via Baiba Svenca
Tom Walton's insight:

Very few of the Prezis you see are actually good; in fact most of them would have been better just as PowerPoints.

 

Some excellent tips here for making better ones.

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Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 17, 2014 11:32 AM

Some  great ideas for students interested in getting away from the conventional PowerPoint! 

Jeff Dumoulin's curator insight, April 18, 2014 9:44 AM

Great Prezi on making great Prezis 

Dave Wood's curator insight, April 18, 2014 3:41 PM

Some really useful tips about structuring information and the impactful use of visuals.  I haven't been a huge fan of Prezi because they can be just too "busy" and disorientating when they incorporate too much spin as they move from image to image. These tips give good advice about how to keep it simple for best effect.

I've used Prezi as a way of presenting the notes from a visual group coaching session back to the participants.

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PowerPoint and the printer are not ICT! : Tech ELT Blog - Ihes.com

PowerPoint and the printer are not ICT! : Tech ELT Blog - Ihes.com | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
Ideas for lessons · Images for class · Interactive whiteboards · Ipod · Listening · Mobile phones · Muddiest points · Not technology · Other languages · Other technologies · Phonetics · Podcasting · PowerPoint · Prezi · Privacy ...
Tom Walton's insight:

You're using PowerPoint, the printer and photocopier in your classes but don't be fooled: that DOESN'T mean you're using 21st century technology. You're NOT!

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Back-to-the-Future Tense: How Does Time Travel Affect Grammar?

Back-to-the-Future Tense: How Does Time Travel Affect Grammar? | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
A recent episode of The Big Bang Theory shows Sheldon, Leonard, Raj, and Howard watching Back to the Future, Part II and discussing the appropriate tense to use when talking about something that happened in an alternate past timeline. So of course...
Tom Walton's insight:

Teaching tenses and using timelines will never be the same again ;-) !

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Doodling: A Teacher’s Secret Weapon for Unlocking Learning

Doodling: A Teacher’s Secret Weapon for Unlocking Learning | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
For educators, there are few things more frustrating than looking out into a classroom during the middle of a lecture and seeing nothing but bent heads. What are your students doing out there?
Tom Walton's insight:

Do your learners doodle? Maybe they should! Do you stop them? Maybe you shouldn't!

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BBC Learning English - The Sounds of English

BBC Learning English - The Sounds of English | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
16 videos to help your #pronunciation #elt #English http://t.co/dmZURkHL5G More coming soon
Tom Walton's insight:

One you want to recommend to your learners!

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The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration

The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
TEST The Difference Between Technology Use And Technology Integration
by TeachThought Staff
Using technology for learning makes sense. Technology creates access, transparency, and opportunity.
Tom Walton's insight:

Hate the term "technology integration" but some of the ideas here are important.

 

Key: that technology is being used by learners, not just teachers!

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Prezi Guide: The 5 Essentials To Stop Your Audience Feeling Sick

Prezi Guide: The 5 Essentials To Stop Your Audience Feeling Sick | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
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Prezi is nothing if not divisive. Some people love it, some people hate it
- I'm in neither of those camps. I find it very useful in some situations,
but still use good old fashioned PowerPoint Slides for more than half the
presentations I give. Prezi should be used for a reason.

Prezi is relatively new (it's been around since 2009), it's getting more
popular (there are around 40 million users now) and it's improving its
interface all the time. Some people accuse it of being style over
substance, but for certain ideas (interactive maps, for example) it
provides substance that slides simply can't bring to the table. For me,
Prezi can be fantastic as long as you adhere to one maxim above all: don't
let the medium get in the way of the message. Any presentation materials
should be there to support the presenter and work FOR the audience in
adding to their experience. Do that, and Prezi can really raise the level
of an audience's engagement.

Potentially, a great Prezi has the wow factor. So why would you want to
completely undermine that by creating something which makes sections of
your audience feel motion-sickness? It's up to you, the presenter, to
minimize the possibility of this as far as humanly possible. Here's how.
(For the short version, view the Prezi about it.)

1. Positioning

The single most important thing about creating a Prezi is the positioning
of the objects on the canvas (and directly related to this, the order in
which they're visited on the path). Position your materials
sympathetically, people! By which I mean, rather than moving haphazardly
around the canvas and disorientating the viewer, move from left to right,
or from top to bottom - move in a way the human brain is used to.

2. Distancing

But positioning is about more than putting your objects in a coherent
pattern - it's about having a uniform (and short) distance between them.
The closer you place your objects together, the less zoom and swoop there
is in your prezi. Place them right next to each other and it won't zoom out
at all, it will just slide right over from one object to the next.

3. Sizing

As with distancing, uniformity is the key to sizing too. Put similarly
sized objects together - ideally make them the exact same size. This means
there's no need to zoom in or out. Contrast this to having a small object
followed by a much larger object and then a small object again: the zoom is
flying all over the place.

4. Rotation

99.9% of rotations and barrel-rolls in Prezis add absolutely zero value to
the presentation.

I just made that stat up but I'm sure it's true. In fact most of the time
rotating actively detracts from a Prezi. It is the Number One cause of
queasyness in the viewer. It can be used with a good reason (a visual
metaphor of some kind to better express your ideas) but otherwise, why
would you? It just gets in the way of your message.

5. Pacing

The ability to zoom in and out is both Prezi's strength and its weakness.
It's what allows you to show the relationship between objects on your
presentation, it's what allows the element of surprise for the big reveal,
it's what lets you put your own hierachy onto your information rather than
having it dictated to you. But it's also at the heart of what can induce
nausea in your audience.

So, pace your Prezi like you would regular slides. Don't move it on every
few seconds - arrive at point on your path, talk about it for two minutes,
or five minutes, or more, and then move on. This means there are fewer
zooms per presentation, and less quickly following one-another. But you can
still take advantage of the zoom's ability to enhance your presentation.


One last note on zooming

If you double-click the right arrow to move your presentation on (or left
arrow to move it back) it zooms twice as fast. This can be effective in
reducing the sea-sick effect - after all it's the transitions which cause
the problems, so if you only transition for 50% of the time you did before,
that helps. The only downside is it feels risky; if you triple click by
mistake, you'll miss your path point entirely and have to go back...

Here's my Prezi on this whole topic - it explains what I've just said in a
visually illustrative way (which is sort of the point of Prezi after all):

 

Finally

All that said, if members of your audience are particularly susceptible to
motion-sickness, even doing ALL of the above may not be enough. So only use
Prezi for a specific reason. Use it to do something PowerPoint can't,
rather than as a direct replacement for the sake of it. Use it to cover
several dispirate topics, or to make something interactive, or to visually
explain relationships between ideas. But if you don't need to do any of
those things, and it's a regular presentation, just use regular slides.
Just be sure to use them well.

Which leads us to a bonus option:

(6. The nuclear option)

Prezi can be a very useful way to make a nice looking presentation: the
fonts, icons, ease of importing images, and themes, make smart presentation
materials without the need for a huge amount of effort or design knowledge.
Once you get over the initial learning curve, it's quicker to make a nice
Prezi than nice slides. So if you want to take advantage of all that, but
want to 100% eliminate the possibility of motion-sickness, simply save your
Prezi as a PDF, and use it as you would slides. Every path point on your
Prezi is a full-page of the PDF so it ends up looking like a (nice)
PowerPoint.

To save a Prezi as a PDF, click the share icon and choose the relevant
option from there.



Disclaimer: Prezi will always make some people sick - they dislike Prezis
intensely, and it's very important to them that they bring this up a lot. I
offer no judgement here; I do the same with LinkedIn. But this guide is
about stopping an audience feeling motion-sickness when watching a Prezi -
if you aren't prepared to take steps to do this, you shouldn't be making
Prezis!
Tom Walton's insight:

Wonderful advice. No one should ever be allowed to use Prezi until they've read this and signed a declaration that they've read it and will follow these essential tips ;-) !!!!

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The Macmillan Education Online Conference

The Macmillan Education Online Conference | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
The Macmillan Education Online Conference returns for a fourth year running, bringing together some of the world’s biggest names in ELT for 5 days of talks.
Tom Walton's insight:

Always worth attending!

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Creating A Google Drive Classroom

Creating A Google Drive Classroom | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
TEST How To Create A Google Drive Classroom
by TeachThought Staff
Using the cloud in the classroom can be a powerful thing.
Tom Walton's insight:

Google Classroom looks a bit like Edmodo, but without the stream. Unless you have learners doing and turning in a lot of written assignments, a private Google+ community might in fact be a better choice.

 

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abeer bakhsh's curator insight, April 12, 11:58 AM

greating a google drive  it help learner to do many thing faster .

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10 Things Every Teacher Should Know How To Do With Google Docs

10 Things Every Teacher Should Know How To Do With Google Docs | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
Google Docs is a powerful word processing tool that many schools have adopted. As it’s similar to Microsoft Word and other word processing tools, most of its features are intuitive to use.
Tom Walton's insight:

... but teachers also need to understand how powerful Google Docs are when it's the learners creating and sharing them.

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Athletes don't eat photocopies before competition! : Tech ELT Blog

Athletes don't eat photocopies before competition! : Tech ELT Blog | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
... thing that would most transform English language teaching, IMHO… Category: Blogging, Edmodo, Google Docs, Ideas for lessons, Interactive whiteboards, Mobile phones, Prezi, Smash the photocopier!, Wikis, YouTube ...
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From my blog... with a great video for use in class!

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A Twitter Abbreviation Guide To Make Sense Of All That Crazy Talk

A Twitter Abbreviation Guide To Make Sense Of All That Crazy Talk | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
A Twitter Abbreviation Guide To Make Sense Of All That Crazy Talk Twitter is a wonderful platform to engage, lurk, socialize, read, distribute, share, or otherwise “do something” with ideas and content.
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10 Habits Of Effective Teachers

10 Habits Of Effective Teachers | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
10 Habits Of Effective Teachers
Tom Walton's insight:

Does NOT include using the photocopier before every class!

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5 Apps for Making Movies on Mobile Devices

5 Apps for Making Movies on Mobile Devices | Technology in Language Teaching | Scoop.it
: Edutopia blogger Monica Burns reviews five movie-making apps for iOS devices and Android tablets, highlighting their no-to-low cost, ease of use, and the wide range of professional-looking products that students can create.
Tom Walton's insight:

Haven't tried any of these myself, but that's definitely the way to go: get your kids to use the technology they already have in their packs and pockets.

 

It's NOT you that should be using technology in your classroom!

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