Technology in Art And Education
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Technology in Art And Education
Applying and Integrating Media and Technology for Learning in a Traditional or Post Modern Classroom.
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Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Graphicacy = Visual Literacy + Visual Thinking

Innovation Design In Education - ASIDE: Graphicacy = Visual Literacy + Visual Thinking | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Innovative design crosses over all aspects of education. The American Society for Innovation Design in Education, or ASIDE, seeks to infuse curriculum with new approaches to teaching and thinking. Integrating the design of information into the daily conversation is an essential part of the teacher's toolkit and the purpose of the ASIDE blog. The underpinning of innovation and educational design is based on looking at the information available and communicating meaning for a world of learners. Thinking like a designer can transform the way children learn. ASIDE's goal is to bring together as much information, resources and supportive scholarship in one place for teaching and learning.
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12 Sources for Free Images to Use on Your Blog and Social Media Posts

12 Sources for Free Images to Use on Your Blog and Social Media Posts | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
The right image may be just the added touch your blog post or social media update needs to get noticed, but finding free, high-quality photos that you can use is challenging. You'll want to bookmark all of these resources to use time and again.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Kim Flintoff
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Layout Cheat Sheet for Infographics : Visual arrangement tips

Layout Cheat Sheet for Infographics : Visual arrangement tips | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it

Infographic layouts refer to the arrangement of your visual elements and your content. When you begin working on a piece of infographic, you should have a story to tell hence, you will need to select a layout that best suits your story. Using the right layout will ensure good readability and convey your message well.

 

We have put together a cheat sheet for your quick reference to the right arrangement to use, here are six common ones you can quickly work with....


Via Jeff Domansky, Kim Flintoff
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

HERE ARE SOME HELPFUL LAYOUTS TO SPEED UP YOUR DESIGNS.

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Tony Guzman's curator insight, March 2, 2015 3:29 PM

This article helps you determine the best layout for the type of infographic you may be creating.

David Baker's curator insight, March 13, 2015 1:21 AM

This is a great tool to share with my seminar teachers whose final project for the year is an infographic.

Lee Hall's curator insight, March 18, 2015 9:26 AM

They show you a visual layout and explain the best use for it.

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17 Fantastic Infographic Generators!

17 Fantastic Infographic Generators! | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it

Data is crucial. However, displaying a chunk of plain data can be monotonous. Infographics visualize plain data and make it visually more appealing. Data turned into infographic has a higher potential to go viral and be effective. While many of us are designers who can design amazing infographs, Infographic Generators can come in handy to Designers and non-designers alike. They can be a time saving resource. So here is a list of 17 fantastic Infographic Generators I compiled together:...


Via Jeff Domansky, Kim Flintoff
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

Here are links for to help with creating info-graphs.

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Willem Kuypers's curator insight, March 9, 2015 2:37 AM

J'utilise de plus en plus les info-graphiques. Ce site aide à les créer pour ceux qui sont moins doués en graphisme.

Fran Bozarth's curator insight, March 11, 2015 2:31 PM

This could spice up just about any presentation - student or instructor. 

Lee Hall's curator insight, March 13, 2015 4:46 PM

Get your ideas and data across in a very effective way.

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The Best 4 Google Drive Tools for Creating Mind Maps and Diagrams

The Best 4 Google Drive Tools for Creating Mind Maps and Diagrams | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
March 18, 2015
Looking for some good mind mapping and brainstorming tools? Below are 4 of the best tools we would recommend for you. All of these tools are integrated with Google Drive which means...
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An Educational and Inspiring Way to Challenge Your Black Child … Meet the ‘Ameka Love’ App

An Educational and Inspiring Way to Challenge Your Black Child … Meet the ‘Ameka Love’ App | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
*With all the apps out there, a parent is left to wonder if any of them will truly educate their child and allow them to have fun learning at the same time.

Via Skip Boykin
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What are the Biggest Mistakes Teachers Make When Integrating Technology into the Classroom?

What are the Biggest Mistakes Teachers Make When Integrating Technology into the Classroom? | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
As part of C.M Rubin's monthly series in the Huffington post: The Global Search for Education: Our Top 12 Global Teacher Blogs, this is the second post. This month we are answering the following pr...
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40 Uses For Smartphones in School | ExamTime

40 Uses For Smartphones in School | ExamTime | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Did you ever think the day would come when you read the title: 40 uses for smartphones in school. Well it's here now. Read on to see what these uses are.

Via Dennis T OConnor, Gust MEES
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:
Excerpt:A revolution in the classroom:Check facts: probably the most common use of all. Both students and teachers can now find facts within seconds. This can be very useful when explaining and debating topics.Take photos: mobile phones can be used as cameras to illustrate work and presentations.Make videos: similar to the last point. For example, videos can be used to record experiments and later include them in projects.Carry out tests: this is probably one of the most interesting and revolutionary uses of the mobile phone in the classroom. Students can now take quizzes and tests on their mobile phone that were created earlier by their teacher. In this way, teachers can gain valuable real-time insight into the knowledge of their students and the effectiveness of their teaching. To implement this technique now, download the ExamTime Mobile App for iOS or Android.Read the news: many teachers often include news articles as part of their teaching methods (for example, in Economics). With an endless amount of news gathering mobile applications, you can bring news and current affairs into the classroom in an instant.Dictionary: there are a multitude of dictionary applications that allow you to check the meaning of a word instantly.Translator: again, this can help with meaning and explanation of a foreign word just like the dictionary application.Click title to read more.....
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Eneritz Madariaga's curator insight, March 19, 2015 6:37 PM

Oso interesgarria ikasleen motibazioa sustatzeko!!

Zengin Çilingir Kale Anahtarcı's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:58 PM

http://www.zengincilingir.com

Manuel Morilla Jaren's curator insight, March 30, 2015 4:41 AM

añada su visión ...

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How the iPad is changing the way we learn

How the iPad is changing the way we learn | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Can issuing students with iPads instead of textbooks make a difference to their education? Rhiannon Williams visits the Danish institutions looking to the future
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

I love technology , but I still love books as well....

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4 Great Apps to Help Pre-schoolers with Reading

4 Great Apps to Help Pre-schoolers with Reading | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
March 16, 2015
Below is a list of four iPad apps teachers and parents can use with kids to enhance their reading skills. These apps target different areas related to improving kids reading and...
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Media and Education Merge in Latest Cousteau Venture - Wired

Media and Education Merge in Latest Cousteau Venture - Wired | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Philippe Cousteau explores the Great Barrier Reef during a recent expedition. (Image: EarthEcho) The modern environmental movement means many things to many people, but to Philippe Cousteau, it still doesn’t mean enough.
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How can we track trends in educational attainment by parental income? Hint: not with the Current Population Survey

How can we track trends in educational attainment by parental income? Hint: not with the Current Population Survey | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Chingos and Dynarski describe gaps in the data that are available to track income differences in educational attainment and the pitfalls they create for analysts, and propose how to fill those gaps.
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Seeing Is Believing: Visual vs. Linear Content

Seeing Is Believing: Visual vs. Linear Content | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it

"In order for our learners to see how designing information changes how it is viewed, the students this year placed their visual infographics side-by-side with their linear notes to see the transformation. It was the “ah ha” moment, when they could examine how the delivery of content mattered and how the deliberate choices in font hierarchy, color selection, and placement changed the way others perceived the ideas."


Via Beth Dichter, Kim Flintoff
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Chris Carter's curator insight, October 21, 2014 9:47 PM

Seeing really is believing.

WhoIsAbishag's curator insight, November 2, 2014 9:32 PM

NLP Strategies.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 2, 2015 10:20 PM

Visual and linear learning design should come together to create a learning tool. Infographics are an example of this. 

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Seeing is Believing: Making Best Use of Your Images in eLearning

Seeing is Believing: Making Best Use of Your Images in eLearning | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Include images in your eLearning that would speak volumes and make lifelong impressions in people’s mind. Don’t produce eye candy.

Via SHIFT eLearning, Peter Mellow
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How To Create Transparent Pictures in PowerPoint (The Fast Way!)

How To Create Transparent Pictures in PowerPoint (The Fast Way!) | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Creating picture transparency is one of those zany things in PowerPoint that is technically impossible…you cannot directly add a transparency to a picture…but there just happens to be a workaround....

Via Kim Flintoff
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Educational Research: A Website with Educationa...

Educational Research: A Website with Educationa... | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
school technology competitors, technology subjects, Educational analysis, Search websites, web internet browser, Academic Research Source: www.webresearch24.com See on Scoop.it - Assessment | Learn...
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8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome Infograph...

8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome Infograph... | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
The 8 Reasons Why Open Badges Are Awesome Infographic presents the usefulness of badges as indicators of skills learned inside or outside the classroom.
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Innovative Online Learning Tools to Use in 2015 | Articles | Noodle

Innovative Online Learning Tools to Use in 2015 | Articles | Noodle | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Online tools are making a huge impact on our learning. Noodle predicts which apps and technology will be most influential in the education sphere in 2015.
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Blended Learning Visually Explained for Teachers

Blended Learning Visually Explained for Teachers | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
March 17, 2015
Blended Learning is one of the major learning concepts that came about as a direct result of the impact of technology integration in education.In blended learning students and teachers...
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Transparency is Bunk

Transparency is Bunk | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it

image from https://twitpic.com/butjn1


Via Dimitar Poposki
Monica S Mcfeeters's insight:

http://www.aaronsw.com/weblog/transparencybunk

 

(Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)

 

Adapted from an impromptu rant I gave to some people interested in funding government transparency projects.

I’ve spent the past year and change working on a site, watchdog.net, that publishes government information online. In doing that, I’ve learned a lot: I’ve looked at everything from pollution records to voter registration databases and I’ve figured out a number of bureacratic tricks to get information out of the government. But I’ve also become increasingly skeptical of the transparency project in general, at least as it’s carried out in the US.

The way a typical US transparency project works is pretty simple. You find a government database, work hard to get or parse a copy, and then put it online with some nice visualizations.

The problem is that reality doesn’t live in the databases. Instead, the databases that are made available, even if grudgingly, form a kind of official cover story, a veil of lies over the real workings of government. If you visit a site like GovTrack, which publishes information on what Congresspeople are up to, you find that all of Congress’s votes are on inane items like declaring holidays and naming post offices. The real action is buried in obscure subchapters of innocuous-sounding bills and voted on under emergency provisions that let everything happen without public disclosure.

So government transparency sites end up having three possible effects. The vast majority of them simply promote these official cover stories, misleading the public about what’s really going on. The unusually cutting ones simply make plain the mindnumbing universality of waste and corruption, and thus promote apathy. And on very rare occasions you have a “success”: an extreme case is located through your work, brought to justice, and then everyone goes home thinking the problem has been solved, as the real corruption continues on as before.

In short, the generous impulses behind transparency sites end up doing more harm than good.

But this is nothing new. The whole history of the “good government” movement in the US is of “reformers” who, intentionally or otherwise, weakened the cause of democracy. They too were primarily supported by large foundations, mostly Ford and Rockefeller. They replaced democratically-elected mayors with professional city managers, which required a supermajority to overrule. They insisted on nonpartisan elections, making it difficult to organize people into political blocs. Arguing it would reduce corruption, they insisted city politicians serve without paying, ensuring the jobs were only open to the wealthy.

I worry that transparency groups may be making the same “mistake”.

These are some dark thoughts, so I want to add a helpful alternative: journalism. Investigative journalism lives up to the promise that transparency sites make. Let me give three examples: Silverstein, Taibbi, Caro.

Ken Silverstein regularly writes brilliant pieces about the influence of money in politics. And he uses these sorts of databases to do so. But the databases are always a small part of a larger picture, supplemented with interviews, documents, and even undercover investigation — he recently did a piece where he posted as a representative of the government of Turkmenistan and described how he was wined and dined by lobbyists eager to build support for that noxious regime. The story, and much more, is told in his book Turkmeniscam. (His book Washington Babylon is similarly indispensible.)

Matt Taibbi, in his book The Great Derangement, describes how Congress really works. He goes to the capitol and lays out the whole scene: the Congressmen naming post offices on the House floor, the journalists typing in the press releases they’re handed, the key actions going on behind the scenes and out of the public eye, the continual use of emergency procedures to evade disclosure laws.

And Robert Caro, in his incredible book The Power Broker (one of the very best books ever published, I’m convinced) takes on this fundamental political question of “Who’s actually responsible for what my government is doing?” For forty years, everyone in New York thought they knew the answer: power was held by the city council, the mayor, the state legislature, and the governor. After all, they run the government, right?

And for forty years, they were all wrong. Power was held — held, for the most part, absolutely, without any checks or outside influence — by one man: Parks Commissioner Robert Moses. All that time, everyone (especially the press) treated Robert Moses as merely the Parks Commissioner, a mere public servant serving his elected officials. In reality, he pulled the strings of all those elected officials.

These journalists tackled all the major questions supposedly addressed by US transparency sites — who’s buying influence? what is Congress doing? who’s in power in my neighborhood? — and not only tell a richer, more informative story, but come to strikingly different answers to the questions. In this era where investigative reporting budgets have been cut to the bone and newspapers are folding left and right, it’s fallen to nonprofits like ProPublica and the Center for Independent Media and, from a previous era, the Center for Public Integrity, to pick up the slack. They’ve been using the Internet in innovative ways to supplement good old-fashioned narrative journalism, where transparency sites are a supplement, rather than an end-in-themselves.

For too long we’ve been funding transparency projects on the model of if-we-build-it-they-will-come: that we don’t know what transparency will be useful for, but once it’s done it will lead to all sorts of exciting possibilities. Well, we’ve built it. And they haven’t come. The only success story its proponents can point to is that transparency projects have bred even more transparency projects. I’m done working on watchdog.net; I’m done hurting America. It’s time to give old-fashioned narrative journalism a try.

 

Previously: Disinfecting the Sunlight Foundation [November 2006]

April 23, 2009

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Dimitar Poposki's curator insight, March 23, 2013 2:34 PM

 

Text c-pasted from http://www.aaronsw.com/weblog/transparencybunk

 

(Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)

 

Adapted from an impromptu rant I gave to some people interested in funding government transparency projects.

I’ve spent the past year and change working on a site, watchdog.net, that publishes government information online. In doing that, I’ve learned a lot: I’ve looked at everything from pollution records to voter registration databases and I’ve figured out a number of bureacratic tricks to get information out of the government. But I’ve also become increasingly skeptical of the transparency project in general, at least as it’s carried out in the US.

The way a typical US transparency project works is pretty simple. You find a government database, work hard to get or parse a copy, and then put it online with some nice visualizations.

The problem is that reality doesn’t live in the databases. Instead, the databases that are made available, even if grudgingly, form a kind of official cover story, a veil of lies over the real workings of government. If you visit a site like GovTrack, which publishes information on what Congresspeople are up to, you find that all of Congress’s votes are on inane items like declaring holidays and naming post offices. The real action is buried in obscure subchapters of innocuous-sounding bills and voted on under emergency provisions that let everything happen without public disclosure.

So government transparency sites end up having three possible effects. The vast majority of them simply promote these official cover stories, misleading the public about what’s really going on. The unusually cutting ones simply make plain the mindnumbing universality of waste and corruption, and thus promote apathy. And on very rare occasions you have a “success”: an extreme case is located through your work, brought to justice, and then everyone goes home thinking the problem has been solved, as the real corruption continues on as before.

In short, the generous impulses behind transparency sites end up doing more harm than good.

But this is nothing new. The whole history of the “good government” movement in the US is of “reformers” who, intentionally or otherwise, weakened the cause of democracy. They too were primarily supported by large foundations, mostly Ford and Rockefeller. They replaced democratically-elected mayors with professional city managers, which required a supermajority to overrule. They insisted on nonpartisan elections, making it difficult to organize people into political blocs. Arguing it would reduce corruption, they insisted city politicians serve without paying, ensuring the jobs were only open to the wealthy.

I worry that transparency groups may be making the same “mistake”.

These are some dark thoughts, so I want to add a helpful alternative: journalism. Investigative journalism lives up to the promise that transparency sites make. Let me give three examples: Silverstein, Taibbi, Caro.

Ken Silverstein regularly writes brilliant pieces about the influence of money in politics. And he uses these sorts of databases to do so. But the databases are always a small part of a larger picture, supplemented with interviews, documents, and even undercover investigation — he recently did a piece where he posted as a representative of the government of Turkmenistan and described how he was wined and dined by lobbyists eager to build support for that noxious regime. The story, and much more, is told in his book Turkmeniscam. (His book Washington Babylon is similarly indispensible.)

Matt Taibbi, in his book The Great Derangement, describes how Congress really works. He goes to the capitol and lays out the whole scene: the Congressmen naming post offices on the House floor, the journalists typing in the press releases they’re handed, the key actions going on behind the scenes and out of the public eye, the continual use of emergency procedures to evade disclosure laws.

And Robert Caro, in his incredible book The Power Broker (one of the very best books ever published, I’m convinced) takes on this fundamental political question of “Who’s actually responsible for what my government is doing?” For forty years, everyone in New York thought they knew the answer: power was held by the city council, the mayor, the state legislature, and the governor. After all, they run the government, right?

And for forty years, they were all wrong. Power was held — held, for the most part, absolutely, without any checks or outside influence — by one man: Parks Commissioner Robert Moses. All that time, everyone (especially the press) treated Robert Moses as merely the Parks Commissioner, a mere public servant serving his elected officials. In reality, he pulled the strings of all those elected officials.

These journalists tackled all the major questions supposedly addressed by US transparency sites — who’s buying influence? what is Congress doing? who’s in power in my neighborhood? — and not only tell a richer, more informative story, but come to strikingly different answers to the questions. In this era where investigative reporting budgets have been cut to the bone and newspapers are folding left and right, it’s fallen to nonprofits like ProPublica and the Center for Independent Media and, from a previous era, the Center for Public Integrity, to pick up the slack. They’ve been using the Internet in innovative ways to supplement good old-fashioned narrative journalism, where transparency sites are a supplement, rather than an end-in-themselves.

For too long we’ve been funding transparency projects on the model of if-we-build-it-they-will-come: that we don’t know what transparency will be useful for, but once it’s done it will lead to all sorts of exciting possibilities. Well, we’ve built it. And they haven’t come. The only success story its proponents can point to is that transparency projects have bred even more transparency projects. I’m done working on watchdog.net; I’m done hurting America. It’s time to give old-fashioned narrative journalism a try.

 

Previously: Disinfecting the Sunlight Foundation [November 2006]

April 23, 2009

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Kerning, and other aspects of typography explained

Kerning, and other aspects of typography explained | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
Charlotte Demonque is the community manager at Fontyou, a Paris-based online co-creation platform dedicated to typography. This post originally appeared on the Fontyou blog, and has been adapted with permission.
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8 Characteristics of the Innovator's Mindset (Updated)

8 Characteristics of the Innovator's Mindset (Updated) | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
(This is an updated version of a previous post simply sharing the graphic created by Sylvia Duckworth.) Recently I explored the notion of the “Innovator’s Mindset”, and have thought a lot about thi...

Via Gust MEES
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Mrs. PH's curator insight, March 15, 2015 12:40 PM

I love everything about this.  All so true, and all so attainable.

Ian Berry's curator insight, March 15, 2015 11:36 PM

Like the article and the links Struck me that we all have an innovators mindset It's a matter of using it!

CIM Academy's curator insight, March 16, 2015 7:12 AM

Creating a culture which embraces innovation is essential and this infographic outlines some key characteristics of innovators to be aware of.

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What is the Perfect Balance of Technology in the Art Room?

What is the Perfect Balance of Technology in the Art Room? | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it
A number of years ago, when my district was organizing an introduction of a 1:1 iPad program, I was asked if I was willing to give up my entire art supply budget to help fund the cost of the new technology.
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