Technology in Art And Education
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Technology in Art And Education
Applying and Integrating Media and Technology for Learning in a Traditional or Post Modern Classroom.
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Prodigy - teaching math using game based learning


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , ismokuhanen
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Marina Polo's curator insight, May 4, 2015 11:14 PM

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Rescooped by Monica S Mcfeeters from Eclectic Technology
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Nine Ways the Common Core Will Change Classroom Practice

Nine Ways the Common Core Will Change Classroom Practice | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it

The Common Core State Standards may "share many features and concepts with existing standards" but "the new standards also represent a substantial departure from current practice in a number of respects."

This post looks at the differences in Mathematics and ELA, providing an explanation with some details for each difference.

In Mathematics the differences listed are;
* Greater Focus

* Coherence

* Skills, Understanding, and Application

* Emphasis on Practices

In English Language Arts the differences listed are:
* More Nonfiction

* Focus on Evidence

* "Staircase" of Text Complexity

* Speaking and Listening

* Literacy in the Content Area


Via Beth Dichter
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Rhyme 'n Learn: World’s Greatest Math and Science Rap

Rhyme 'n Learn: World’s Greatest Math and Science Rap | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it

"Rhyme ‘n Learn is math and science taught by mnemonics. A mnemonic is a learning aid. It uses word associations like rhymes so that a term or fact is easier to recall later. An example of a mnemonic is “In fourteen hundred ninety two Columbus sailed the ocean blue.” I learned that in 3rd grade. Thanks Mrs. Erbach.

Rhyme ‘n Learn was created by me, Joe Ocando. I’ve taught math and science to students of all ages and discovered that many find it difficult to memorize hundreds of new terms and facts. I also found that rote learning is boring and not very effective for long term retention."

Currently there are 14 math raps and 11 science raps available. 


Via Beth Dichter
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The Innovative Educator: Want to succeed in STEM? Listen to the experts!

The Innovative Educator: Want to succeed in STEM? Listen to the experts! | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it

This post begins with a quote from President Obama:

"“The quality of math and science teachers is the most important single factor influencing whether students will succeed or fail in science, technology, engineering and math.” From this point it veers  in a different direction, noting that the issue is that teachers "are not given the freedom to support children in ways that will produce the scientists and innovators our country needs."

If we look to our past (and our present) we will find that we are not listening to the advice that "our nation's historic inventors, scientists, and physicists (whom have shared) their advice and experiences." 

Read the article to learn the experiences of Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Richard Feyman, Michio Kaku (which includes a video where he explains "that exams are crushing curiousity out of the next generation..."), as well as individuals around today such as Aaron Iba and Jack Andraka (the student who at the age of 15 created a test for pancreatic cancer).

Perhaps the question we need to ask is how do we change the system to support the necessary learning? 


Via Beth Dichter
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How Computerized Tutors Are Learning to Teach Humans

How Computerized Tutors Are Learning to Teach Humans | Technology in Art And Education | Scoop.it

Can computers learn to teach students, and respond to cues that students put out that comuters may not recognize? Neil Heffernan has been working on this question since 1995. Back in 1997, two years into a graduate program at Carnegie Mellon Institute, he had "come to believe that the programs did little to assist their users."  But his perspective changed when he began to videotaple tutoring sessions of a human tutor.

This article explores the issues of computerized tutors and looks at a specific program, ASSISTments (http://www.assistments.org/) that is primarily used to tutor math. To learn how ASSISTments is working in a variety of districts and more about computerized tutoring take the time to read this article.


Via Beth Dichter
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