Technology for the younger years
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Technology for the younger years
This is my curated collection of resources on technology in the younger years of primary school.
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bouwen - WebGUI

bouwen - WebGUI | Technology for the younger years | Scoop.it
Lennie Gorissen's insight:

This page is in Dutch, ideal for me but not so much for the English reader, however when looking at all the images you can imagine how to make creations like the one in the picture above. Great ideas on how to use technology in the early years primary classroom. I also really love the activity with the bridge and a car goes across. Great to bring out critical and creative skills in a design and technology activity. I love activities that are hands-on, interesting and apply to real life. Check out the link above.

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Balloon rocket activity

Balloon rocket activity | Technology for the younger years | Scoop.it

What you will need

1 balloon (round ones will work, but the longer "airship" balloons work best)1 long piece of kite string (about 10-15 feet long)1 plastic strawTape

 

What to do

Tie one end of the string to a chair, door knob, or other support.Put the other end of the string through the straw.Pull the string tight and tie it to another support in the room.Blow up the balloon (but don't tie it.) Pinch the end of the balloon and tape the balloon to the straw as shown above. You're ready for launch.Let go and watch the rocket fly! 

How does it work?

So how does it work? It's all about the air...and thrust. As the air rushes out of the balloon, it creates a forward motion called THRUST. Thrust is a pushing force created by energy. In the balloon experiment, our thrust comes from the energy of the balloon forcing the air out. Different sizes and shapes of balloon will create more or less thrust. In a real rocket, thrust is created by the force of burning rocket fuel as it blasts from the rockets engine - as the engines blast down, the rocket goes up!

 

Make it an experiment

The project above is a DEMONSTRATION. To make it a true experiment, you can try to answer these questions:

1. Does the shape of the balloon affect how far (or fast) the rocket travels?
2. Does the length of the straw affect how far (or fast) the rocket travels?
3. Does the type of string affect how far (or fast) the rocket travels? (try fishing line, nylon string, cotton string, etc.)
4. Does the angle of the string affect how far (or fast) the rocket travels?

 

Link:

http://www.sciencebob.com/experiments/balloonrocket.php

Lennie Gorissen's insight:

Great activity to intergrate the science and technology subject areas. Students can look at the design of the rocket and how the design can be altered/ changed to better the outcome in regards to speed/ distance etc. This activity is a great one to do in the lower or upper primary school classroom. The questions at the end can be altered to suit the year level and ability levels of the students.

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8bigideas.pdf

Lennie Gorissen's insight:

Hi I really relate to the 8 points made in this article. I have listed some of the points below that I really relate to, however I think all the points made are excellent and definitely worth a read.

Point one: Learning by doing; I think we all learn better when we don't just learn facts but when we are able to use those facts and turn them into skills to create.

Point three: working hard to achieve something

Point four: learning to learn; there is much more value to learning when students can see and understand why they are learning something and the learning has value to them

Point six: you can’t get it right without getting it wrong: I think often students are so focussed on not making a mistake that they will stop trying when something is unfamiliar to them or seems difficult at first. I like the notion of you can’t get it right without getting it wrong as we need to use trial and error to see what works and what does not. We need to make mistake and learn from them in order to grow as human beings.

Point seven: Do unto ourselves what we do unto our students. Students are not the only ones that need to continue to grow and reflect on their learning. We do as well if we want to be great educators. We cannot set expectations of our students that we do not meet ourselves. The future is ever changing and it is vital that we keep up to date so as to best prepare the next generations to come.

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6 Learning Methods Every 21st Century Teacher should Know ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

6 Learning Methods Every 21st Century Teacher should Know ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Technology for the younger years | Scoop.it

Via Mila Saint Anne
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What is Technology

“Technology is how people modify the natural world to suit their own purposes”

 

International Technology of Engineering Educators Association

 

Link; http://www.iteaconnect.org/Resources/whatistechteaching.htm

 

Lennie Gorissen's insight:

I initially thought of technology as Information Communication Technology; which looks at things like iPads, computers, interactive whiteboards and so forth. I now realise that the notion of technology is much broader than what I initially thought. Technology is anything man-made to suit a purpose, a want or a need. Technology exist in a social context and is influenced by the needs and the wants of individuals but also the needs and wants of the society in which they live.

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How Technology is changing Education

How Technology is changing Education | Technology for the younger years | Scoop.it
An interesting article on Schools.com.

Via Digital Georgia
Lennie Gorissen's insight:

Hi, here are some examples of how to use Video technology in the classroom. The article shows some great examples and also shows a comparison between the educational platforms from both the teacher and students perspective. I really like the interactive activities the skill-builder websites and YouTube EDU offers as well as the idea of using Skype in the classroom. I think Skype would be a great way to interact with other schools across the globe on projects especially cultural projects.

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NASA robots activity

Getting started

Begin the lesson by asking students to imagine they are robots in Earth's orbit with a simple task to perform: Tie the safety tether of an astronaut to a metal ring in the open cargo bay of the space shuttle. Easy for a high­tech robot, right?

Have students put on blindfolds and tie their shoes. Ask them to try it again, this time wearing the blindfolds and heavy gloves. Repeat the task a third time, but this time tape Popsicle sticks or tongue depressors to the fingers of the gloves.

Ask students the following questions: Why is it so hard to tie your shoes? What are the many different kinds of signals your brain receives from your body to do this seemingly simple task? What would be involved in building a machine to tie your shoes?


Overview

Sometime during your life, maybe about 20 years from now, you will see the first images of a human walking on Mars. Long before a human undertakes the dangerous task of going to Mars, however, the planet will be explored by an army of large and small robots.

A robot is an electronically controlled device programmed to conduct tasks that could normally be done by human workers. In hostile environments everywhere, particularly in space, modern explorers are turning to robots to undertake dangerous missions­missions that cannot yet be undertaken by humans. In July 1997, a small robotic rover called Sojourner drove around on the cold surface of Mars, the first of many robots being designed by NASA to explore other planets. On Earth, smart robots are being developed to venture into active volcanoes, dive deep into the oceans, search for land mines left from wars, and help police disarm terrorist bombs.

Much robot development is spurred by NASA. The space agency plans to use robots in three basic ways: on­orbit assembly, science payload tending, and planetary surface exploration. Assembly robots will help build Space Station Alpha during the next few years. The robots will be the eyes and hands of human controllers who will use something called virtual reality telepresence to see what the robot sees.

Science payload robots will help astronauts inside the space station and will run science experiments when people aren't around. Exploration robots will land on and survey distant planets, moons, and asteroids. These robots must be able to "think" for themselves. If a robot comes to a cliff on Mars, for example, it has to stop without a controller back on Earth telling it to do so. Thinking robots are important because it takes many minutes to communicate between Earth and other planets, so human controllers can't respond fast enough to help a robot avoid a dangerous situation.

Earth­bound industries are adapting much of NASA's robotic technology for everything from tiny microsurgery tools to giant steam shovels. While a robot may never actually tie your shoes, the machines are increasingly becoming creatures not just of science fiction, but of the real world.


Connections
1. Robots have been used in manufacturing for more than a decade. What products do you use that were made with the help of a robot? How and why was a robot used?

2. Do you think a smart robot could be your friend? How would that be different from having a human friend or even a pet? What responsibilities would you have toward the robot?

3. What activities or problems can you think of that a robot could solve or at least help with?

 

PROGRAM YOUR PARTNER
NASA ROBOTS: Student Activity
Try your hand at guiding a robot to do a simple task.

Main activity

Until robots become true "thinking" machines, able to understand their environment and make decisions about what to do to accomplish their mission, they will depend on controllers to guide them. In this activity you will work with a partner to find out how hard it is to accurately guide a robot through even simple tasks.

Materials

v  blindfold

v  notebook

v  shoe box (or some other container that size)

v  baseball or tennis ball

1. Working with a partner, one of you will take on the role of a robot, the other the controller. The person playing the robot should be securely blindfolded and given the ball.

2. The robot, following verbal instructions from the controller, must move along a prescribed course (down an aisle and around a desk, for example) and then deposit the ball in the container. The robot can't talk during the first attempt and must follow the directions given to it exactly ("turn right" doesn't necessarily mean all parts of the body or 90° right). After the robot has successfully put the ball in the container, the robot and controller should switch roles and try it again.

3. When you have both completed the task, figure out what the most difficult part in communicating instructions was, then develop a written glossary of commands to make maneuvering easier. Define a specific length for a step (the length of a piece of notebook paper, for example) and instead of saying "turn right" or "turn left," work out specific angles for the size of turns ("turn 20 degrees to the right," for example).

4. Repeat the mission again using a different route, taking a turn in each role. Did the glossary make things easier for both the robot and the controller? Was there less misunderstanding?

5. Try it again, but this time draw a map of the route the robot is supposed to take. The controller must sit facing away from the course the robot must follow, but this time the controller will use the robot's eyes (which in a real robot would be a TV camera). The controller must use the map to keep track of the robot's location and is allowed to ask "yes" and "no" questions so the robot can give feedback about its surroundings. The robot must still await the controller's instructions before moving.

Questions

1. What problems might you face if the robot wasn't as smart as you or your partner?

2. The minimum round-time for a signal between Earth and Mars is 8.8 minutes; the maximum time is 41.9 minutes. How would you change your commands if they took 20 or 30 minutes to reach your robot? What dangers would that delay cause?

3. What sensory devices could you add to the robot to make controlling it more precise?

 

Link:

http://www.reachoutmichigan.org/funexperiments/agesubject/lessons/newton/nasa.html

Lennie Gorissen's insight:

Great activity to implement in the primary school classroom. It gets students to really consider the design elements of the technology strand as well as use critical and creative thinking skills. The task is engaging, interesting and looks at real-life problems/ situations. 

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Constructionism vs. Instructionism

Lennie Gorissen's insight:

Hi this is a great article with some examples of how to use constructionism in the classroom. Essentially constructionism is based on the notion that people learn effectively through making things. It is a great pedagogical approach to take note of in the classroom especially in the technology classroom. The article is broken up into five different sections, the first page give an introduction to the pedagogical approach as well as how it is used and seen by students around the world, the additional pages look into Lego/ Logo programming and other education software and how it can be used for different purposes. I think this article shows some great ideas for the different ways technology can be incorporated to suit the needs of our students, culture and society.

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Making a clock

Making a clock | Technology for the younger years | Scoop.it
Lennie Gorissen's insight:

One fun activity you can do in a math lesson is make a clock. It is a great way to get the children engaged and motived and it is a great way to start the concept of time. You can use this resource and guide the children through the process step by step or for the older grades you can get the students to write their own numbers in the gaps and complete the resource on their own.

The link for the resource is http://www.tes.co.uk/ResourceDetail.aspx?storyCode=3002715

 

Exploring (Early Years Curriculum)

With support, the child experiments with different technologies and, talks about some of the purposes they serve at home or in the learning environment.

Link; http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au/downloads/p_10/ey_phase_descriptors_06.pdf

 

Technologies and society (Australian Curriculum)

2.1 Understand how people, including designers and technologists, design and produce familiar products, services and environments to meet personal and local community needs

Link; http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/Draft_Shape_of_the_Australian_Curriculum_Technologies_paper_-_March_2012.pdf

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Technology Projects

Technology Projects | Technology for the younger years | Scoop.it
Lennie Gorissen's insight:

Hi I found this great site that lists all these extraordinary projects using ordinary recycled or household objects. The projects are interesting, meaningful and engaging and links the students learning from school life outside of school including the wider community. The students get a grasp of how we create objects in today's world to suit our needs and the needs of the community, which is the basis of what technology stands for. 

The projects incorporate many different learning areas like math and science. The Math stands that are used in these projects are; Number, Data, Measurement and Space and Geometry.

Link to website; http://www.looledo.com/index.php

 

Applying (Early Years Curriculum)

The child uses some available technologies for personal or learning needs, and talks about how these technologies might work, or help people in their communities.

Link; http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au/downloads/p_10/ey_phase_descriptors_06.pdf

 

(Australian Curriculum)

Technologies and society

2.1 Understand how people, including designers and technologists, design and produce familiar products, services and environments to meet personal and local community needs

Materials and technologies specialisations

2.2 Investigate and play with technologies, materials and systems used to identify properties and create designed solutions for personal and local community needs

Food and fibre production

2.3 Investigate sustainable systems of care for plants and animals that are grown, raised and processed for food, clothing and shelter for an identified purpose

Critiquing, exploring and investigating

2.5 Explore and investigate needs or opportunities for designing and the resources required to realise designed solutions

 

Link; http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/Draft_Shape_of_the_Australian_Curriculum_Technologies_paper_-_March_2012.pdf

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