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The Nuclear Fusion Arms Race Is Underway

The Nuclear Fusion Arms Race Is Underway | Technology | Scoop.it

Scientists today are much closer to creating fusion energy than they were 40 years ago. And while most large public research projects are still decades from producing a reactor that can compete in the marketplace, a number of private companies have jumped headlong into the fusion race. Propelled by advances in engineering and science, changes in public funding, and tens of millions in high-risk high-tech investment dollars, they’re betting they can create a scalable, sellable reactor in less than a decade.


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Bad to the Bone – 3D Printed Replacement Skeletons

Bad to the Bone – 3D Printed Replacement Skeletons | Technology | Scoop.it

Dr. Rita Kandel is Chief of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, and along with a staff of over 200 medical professionals, Kandel and her team are attempting to use 3D printing technology to build new tissues to replace human joints damaged by injury or disease.
Dr. Kandel says those replacement parts will be built in her lab. And they'll be built within the next five years.
The Mount Sinai hospital researchers say they've developed their technique – which uses a patient's own tissues – to replace human bones and that those bones are created by a 3D printer.


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Laurent Brixius's curator insight, October 27, 2013 1:38 PM

Encore une application pour l'impression 3D dans le domaine de la santé : imprimer des os à partir des propres tissus des patients.

Kai Linder's curator insight, October 28, 2013 5:21 AM

Good news for all us action athletes! 

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Paul Allen and the Machines: Teaching the next generation of artificial intelligence

Paul Allen and the Machines: Teaching the next generation of artificial intelligence | Technology | Scoop.it

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has been pondering artificial intelligence since he was a kid. In the late '60s, eerily intelligent computers were everywhere, whether it was 2001's HAL or Star Trek's omnipresent Enterprise computer. As Allen recalls in his memoir, "machines that behaved like people, even people gone mad, were all the rage back then." He would tag along to his father's job at the library, overwhelmed by the information, and daydream about "the sci-fi theme of a dying or threatened civilization that saves itself by finding a trove of knowledge." What if you could collect all the world's information in a single computer mind, one capable of intelligent thought, and be able to communicate in simple human language? 

Forty years later, with nearly 9 billion dollars to Allen's name, that idea is beginning to seem like more than just fantasy. Much of the technology is already here. We talk to our phones and aren't surprised when they talk back. A web search can answer nearly any question, undergirded by a semantic understanding of the structure of online information. But while the tools are powerful, the processes behind them are still fairly basic. Siri only understands a small subset of questions, and she can't reason, or do anything you might call thinking. Even Watson, IBM'sJeopardy champ, can only handle simple questions with unambiguous phrasing. Already, Google is looking to the Star Trek computer as a guiding light for its voice search — but it's still a long way off. If technology is going to get there, we'll need computers that are better at talking and, more crucially, better at reasoning.


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Roger Ellman's curator insight, October 28, 2013 5:48 AM

Food, or a at least a snack.., for thought

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Battery-free wireless communication technology highlights UW computer ... - GeekWire

Battery-free wireless communication technology highlights UW computer ... - GeekWire | Technology | Scoop.it
Battery-free wireless communication technology highlights UW computer ...
GeekWire
The impressive work coming out of University of Washington's computer science department was on full display Wednesday evening inside the Paul G.
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India's informal value: Hidden value

India's informal value: Hidden value | Technology | Scoop.it

THE chief architect of India’s constitution, B.R. Ambedkar, once said its villages were “a den of ignorance, narrow-mindedness and communalism”. Now some think they are the strongest bit of the economy. Neelkanth Mishra, an analyst at Credit Suisse, reckons that, if activity in informal industries and rural areas were properly measured, India’s GDP would look bigger and more stable and the present slump less severe. This is a source of comfort at a time when India is fighting a financial panic.

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Biology's Brave New World

Biology's Brave New World | Technology | Scoop.it

All the key barriers to the artificial synthesis of viruses and bacteria have been overcome, spawning a dizzying array of perils and promises. But as the scientific community forges ahead, the biosecurity establishment remains behind the curve.


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Mario Gonzalez's curator insight, January 6, 2014 12:32 AM

Reading this article astounded me and reasured my intrest in Biology and is just ridiculously interesting

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Aerospace Industry Demands Accurate, Fast and Reliable Simulation Technology

http://ansys.com/Industries/Aerospace+&+Defense The modern aircraft is an engineering marvel. The epitome of a smart system. An intricate balance of hardware...
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Alan Turing 101: A Quick Education on the Father of Computer Science

Alan Turing 101: A Quick Education on the Father of Computer Science | Technology | Scoop.it

The Imitation Game, due for a 2014 release, is a new film starring Sherlock actor Benedict Cumberbatch as the English genius of math, cryptology, and logic, Alan Turing. The movie combines computer science and Mr. Cumberbatch — two of our favorite things — and we can't wait until it hits theaters next year.

 

But before our beloved Benedict takes to the big screen once again, get to know the man he's playing: Alan Turing, a fascinating character who established many of the founding principles of computer science.

 

[Click the title to jump to the article.]


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