Classroom Climate
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Podz Centric Ottomans classroom furniture school furniture Melbourne - Victorian Educational Furniture

Podz Centric Ottomans classroom furniture school furniture Melbourne - Victorian Educational Furniture | Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Podz Centric Ottomans classroom furniture school furniture Melbourne - Victorian Educational Furniture
Olivia Jackson's insight:

The interlocking "units" shown above can be arranged so that there is one individual unit, or multiple ones in circle. Seeing how these units interlock, students realize that collaboration is important*. The units are made so that they can link up with others, and this linkage is something seen in the "classroom space"*. When the units are combined into a circle, students have an especially "powerful image" of a perfectly connected ring*. They can sense and act on the teacher's encouragement that they join together in discussion. Feeling united with their classmates, students can deeply communicate and devote attention to "others' perspectives."

 

*References (sources of information that were incorporated in my response, or which provided helpful background information):

-EDCI397 with Dr. Lisa Bote (discussions and web postings about resilience and "global competence"; the following are some specific resources/links that were provided: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Seven_Essentials_for_Project-Based_Learning.aspx 

 http://asiasociety.org/education/partnership-global-learning/making-case/global-competence-prepare-youth-engage-world; foreword (by Gene Wilhoit) and Ch. 1 from Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth  to Engage the World, by Veronica Boix Mansilla & Anthony Jackson)

-other courses I have taken (i.e. EDCI280 with Khara Schonfeld-Karan; high school literature classes, such as AP class with Michael Curtin)

-related ideas in EDCI461 with Dr. Rose Marie Codling (including a video we watched, which can be found at the following link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4E10e8zIkw#t=491)

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Responsive Schools (Overview: Part 2 of 3) - YouTube

What does Responsive Classroom look like in a school? See for yourself, and hear what teachers, administrators, and students have to say about being part of ...
Olivia Jackson's insight:

The morning meetings shown in this video seem to help students practice and learn collaboration skills*. Knowing how to "listen to a classmate's ideas and assert their own" is important for PBL*, because the project-process involves such collaboration. By developing these skills, students can "take advantage" of the PBL process to learn from each other*. As they work on projects, they can seek each others' ideas and discuss what they are learning*.

This video also exemplifies how students can make choices and be engaged*. One educator describes choices over "the product they create" and "the topics they pursue," which might be considered a beginning level of PBL. With this experience, and their involvement in creating classroom rules, they will have practice thinking for themselves*. They will be familiar with and skillful in developing their thoughts*, something they will continue to do in future PBL.

 

*References (sources of information that were incorporated in my response, or which provided helpful background information):

-EDCI397 with Dr. Lisa Bote (including discussions and web posts about resilience; PBL; the "whole child"; "learning experiences"; "rules and expectations"; the following are some specific resources and  links that were provided: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Seven_Essentials_for_Project-Based_Learning.aspx  http://asiasociety.org/education/partnership-global-learning/making-case/global-competence-prepare-youth-engage-world; foreword (by Gene Wilhoit) and Ch.1 from Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth  to Engage the World, by Veronica Boix Mansilla & Anthony Jackson )

-Other classroom contexts: i.e. EDCI461 discussion (including those related to motivation)

-The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child, by Donalyn Miller

-other experiences and sources I have encountered

 

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Remake Your Class Part 3: Exploring a Collaborative Learning Environment - YouTube

Visit http://www.edutopia.org/remake for more tips and resources! Edutopia's three-part series follows a determined teacher at Roosevelt Middle School in San...
Olivia Jackson's insight:

In this video, the tables are "rearranged" in a classroom to create more "flow and "space." As a student comments, this makes the room feel more "organized." From personal experience, I know that being organized makes me more hopeful that I will accomplish my work, and motivates me to build on the orderliness that is already there.

The video also shows a whiteboard that covers an entire wall. Like the easel in another post, this allows students to "be a teacher or solve problems." My classroom may not have as much "whiteboard space" on the walls, but I could bring in easels or mini-whiteboards*. This would enable students to express themselves and create, instead of simply watching the teacher*. Though students could use their own paper, doing work on these spaces could make them feel more like  teachers (as this video suggests) and  "presenters" of information*. They could also erase their ideas or flip to a larger sheet of paper, giving them more room to express their ideas and sketch out new ones*. This could help them innovate and develop their ideas as they complete PBL activities.

 

*References (sources of information that were incorporated in my response, or which provided helpful background information):

-EDCI397 with Dr. Lisa Bote (including discussions/web postings about resilience and PBL; and "global competence"; the following are some specific links and resources that were provided:http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Seven_Essentials_for_Project-Based_Learning.aspx  http://asiasociety.org/education/partnership-global-learning/making-case/global-competence-prepare-youth-engage-world; foreword (by Gene Wilhoit) and Ch. 1 from Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth  to Engage the World, by Veronica Boix Mansilla & Anthony Jackson)

-"Just beautiful classrooms" post on this board

-a video on my PBL board from High Tech High

-EDCI280 presentations and discussions, with Khara Schonfeld-Karan

-related ideas from EDCI461 reading and discussion, with Dr. Rose Marie Codling

-EDMS410 with Dr. Kathryn Anderson Alvestad

-mini white boards also discussed in "Daily Rituals" post

-other experiences and sources I have encountered

 

 

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Making Friends With Failure

Making Friends With Failure | Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
No one likes failure, the F-word, no matter how you sugarcoat it. But failure is a part of life. Sometimes things don't work out. Sometimes you don't get what you want. Stuff happens. But if we recas
Olivia Jackson's insight:

This article suggests that "risk-taking" should be a classroom norm. If students are accustomed to taking risks, they will not have to drastically change their "mindset" for PBL*. In PBL, the teacher may not help or direct students in much detail*.  As a result, students have to be "creative and innovative," and have the ability to "adapt." They need to be "adventurous" and "explore possibilities," or otherwise restrict themselves out of fear. If they do not take risks, they might not accomplish anything*. PBL deliberately "leaves room" for critiquing others' work, "honoring the expectation" that risk-taking will not lead to perfect work.

 

Questioning is also factored into the PBL process, when students decide upon a "driving question." It is encouraged to treat these questions with curiosity and interest, as topics that students can intelligently explore. If students acknowledge that "it's ok to fail," asking questions does not have to be  "shameful*."  As the article puts it,  "questions and mistakes are more instructive than getting the answer."

 

*References(sources of information that were incorporated in my response, or which provided helpful background information):

-EDCI397 with Dr. Lisa Bote (including discussions/web postings/readings about resilience; Project Based Learning; and "global competence"; the following are some specific resources and links that were provided: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Seven_Essentials_for_Project-Based_Learning.aspx  http://asiasociety.org/education/partnership-global-learning/making-case/global-competence-prepare-youth-engage-world;  foreword (by Gene Wilhoit) and Ch. 1 from Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth  to Engage the World, by Veronica Boix Mansilla & Anthony Jackson )

-supporting ideas on my PBL board (from "High Tech High Videos" post)

-article I read in course of my content curation, which also discusses failure

-relevant ideas discussed/read in EDCI461, with Dr. Rose Marie Codling)

-other experiences and sources I have encountered

 

 

 

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Using Humor in the Classroom

Using Humor in the Classroom | Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
“But why do I have to go? School is not fun!” That quote is from a first-grade child, asking his mom why he has to go every single day to this place that he was told was going to be a lot of fun,
Olivia Jackson's insight:

This article incorporates advice from the "former president of the Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor," explaining why humor is helpful in classrooms. It suggests that humor can alleviate stress and promote "'common, positive emotional experience.'" In an atmosphere that is relaxed and accepting of mistakes*, students can be "flexible" and "adaptive," and laugh at mistakes. Instead of feeling "helpless*," like the teacher is the only means of solving their problems*, they can "refocus*" and persevere ("'last'"). Because students will be making choices and sharing ideas in PBL, humor is helpful to these endeavors.

 

Based on my own teaching and learning experiences, humor also makes things fun and casts the teacher in a more "human" light*. Humor sends the message that learning can be enjoyable, which can then open students to the many topics that PBL "encompasses." Furthermore, if the teacher is seen as "human," as someone who laughs like everyone else, she becomes more relatable and approachable*. This allows students to feel more energized and comfortable being themselves, getting them into the "spirit" of PBL. Their general excitement can support them when they "identify 'driving questions'" and get involved in exploring these questions.

 

The article offers  a couple "humor strategies" which I particularly like: posting humorous quotes on a bulletin board and "encouraging students to do the same," and having a "Joke Friday," where students share a joke at some point in the day. Not only do these strategies encourage humor, but they get students involved. Students should always be involved, and in the context of humor,  be able to practice humor themselves. They can create and respond to humor without relying on the teacher, preparing them for the "voice and choice" of PBL.

 

 

* References (sources of information that were incorporated in my response, or which provided helpful background information):

 

-EDCI397 discussions, documents, and readings with Dr. Lisa Bote; this includes discussions/web postings/readings about resilience;  PBL; "classroom climate"; and "learning experiences"

 

-a video on my PBL board, titled "Keep it Real"

 

-The following link (provided in EDCI397) was referenced for information about PBL: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Seven_Essentials_for_Project-Based_Learning.aspx)

 

-EDCI280 with Khara Schonfeld-Karan (where we discussed "enjoying" learning)

 

-related ideas from EDCI461, with Dr. Rose Marie Codling

 

-importance of being "approachable" also noted at following link: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/570760952747682560/

 

-words directly taken or similar to wording used in this posted source (may or may not be indicated by quotations)

 

-other experiences and sources I have encountered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Daily Rituals: The First Fifteen Minutes | Scholastic.com

Daily Rituals: The First Fifteen Minutes | Scholastic.com | Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
I don’t believe that there is one “right” way to start the school day. I have my traditions, and I have watched beautiful and very different beginnings in many other classrooms. Here are just some possibilities.
Olivia Jackson's insight:

One ritual which I especially like from this blog post is the job of "Morning DJ," in which "The DJ chooses a song from the class iPod." It discourages students from feeling isolated, scared, or restricted*, instead allowing them to "connect" with other students and have fun*. I also admire the fact that the student, and not the teacher, gets to be DJ. In fulfilling this job, the student can "exercise some control" and make choices in the classroom*. PBL might involve more challenging decisions*, but students can better envision themselves as decision-makers and see that they have some power*.

 

*References (sources of information that were incorporated in my response, or which provided helpful background information):

-EDCI397 with Dr. Lisa Bote (including readings and related class research about PBL; discussions and web posting about resilience;the following are some specific resources/ links that were provided:  http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Seven_Essentials_for_Project-Based_Learning.aspx  http://asiasociety.org/education/partnership-global-learning/making-case/global-competence-prepare-youth-engage-world; foreword (by Gene Wilhoit) and Ch. 1 from Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth  to Engage the World, by Veronica Boix Mansilla & Anthony Jackson )

-a video on my PBL board, titled "Keep it Real"

-EDCI280 presentations and discussions, with Khara Schonfeld-Karan

-EDCI461 readings, presentations, and discussions, with Dr. Rose Marie Codling (including a video we watched about Self-Determination Theory, which can be found at the following link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4E10e8zIkw#t=491)

-The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Reader in Every Child, by Donalyn Miller

-EDMS410 with Dr. Kathryn Anderson Alvestad

-discussions of interacting with the environment, in EDHD411 with Dr. Geetha Ramani

-words directly taken or similar to wording used in this posted source (may or may not be indicated by quotations)

-other experiences and sources I have encountered (including educational contexts which have emphasized student thinking)

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Love this idea | Classroom Communication | Pinterest

Love this idea | Classroom Communication | Pinterest | Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
This Pin was discovered by Leigh Pourciau. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest. | See more about exit slips, exit tickets and students.
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Jamie Pope's curator insight, April 13, 2014 8:51 PM

A quick formative assessment that can be used every week, day, or even transition between subjects. The anonymity may be nice for the students; however, having a way to identify which student posted what would help the teacher provide extra help to those who need it.

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Pin by Lita Lita on Just beautiful classrooms | Pinterest

Pin by Lita Lita on Just beautiful classrooms | Pinterest | Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Kids Study Table Ideas for Preschool Classroom Layout Design Ideas | See more about layout design, preschools and layout.
Olivia Jackson's insight:

"I like how the caption for this picture indicates a "study table," rather than a generic, nonspecific "table." This word-choice suggests that the young students who sit here are expected to do something. Though I initially picture high school and college students when I think of "study desks," it seems that they would also be useful for elementary-school students. They too have valuable insights to share*, and they should learn how to collaborate. In addition, the easel nearby allows students to illustrate their ideas; as a result, their discussion is not limited to spoken words and they can develop or express their ideas visually*.

 

More broadly, this desk and easel set-up seems to encourage collaboration and engagement*. Students can ask each other questions, "brainstorm" ideas*, and enjoy and learn from the conversations they are having. They can  pursue and share their ideas, developing the initiative and self-esteem that "underlie" resilience*. This serious communication is useful in a "real world context," and can be practiced in the course of PBL.

 

*References (sources of information that were incorporated in my response, or which provided helpful background information):

-EDCI397 with Dr. Lisa Bote (including discussions/web postings about resilience and the "whole child"; "global competence"; and PBL;  the following are some specific links that were provided:  http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Seven_Essentials_for_Project-Based_Learning.aspx http://asiasociety.org/education/partnership-global-learning/making-case/global-competence-prepare-youth-engage-world; foreword (by Gene Wilhoit) and Ch. 1 from  Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth  to Engage the World, by Veronica Boix Mansilla & Anthony Jackson )

-a video on my PBL board, titled "Keep it Real"

-phrases encountered in other educational contexts (i.e. EDCI280 with Khara Schonfeld-Karan

-related ideas from EDCI461 readings and discussion, with Dr. Rose Marie Codling (including a video we watched, which can be found at the following link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4E10e8zIkw#t=491)

-other sources and experiences I have encountered

 

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How Are Students’ Roles Changing in the New Economy of Information?

How Are Students’ Roles Changing in the New Economy of Information? | Classroom Climate | Scoop.it
Beyond increasing the amount of information that students can access, the new abundant economy of information has far greater implications. It represents both a shift in the way that future classrooms will operate as well as in the student behaviors that we will value and expect.
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Bad Signs

articles by alfie kohn
Olivia Jackson's insight:

,This essay relates to the "voice and choice" used in Project Based Learning.  It discusses the importance of letting students decide "'what goes on the walls,'" or hanging "mementos" that reflect themselves. It also discourages posters that send oppressive messages and make students feel "unwelcome" to express their feelings or questions. Student expression is something that also happens in PBL; if this expression is a "common practice," students will have more experience "brainstorming*" and building their own ideas.

Kohn's ideas also relate to the "supported" dimension of the "Whole Child Tenets." Specifically, he says that educators should not make students feel like they must hide their "negative feelings" and struggles. If they do push this idea, students may feel the need to deal with their problems alone*. Another possibility is that students will feel guilty for needing help, or think that it is "against the rules" to ask.

 

 

*References (sources of information that were incorporated in my response, or which provided helpful background information):

-EDCI397 with Dr. Lisa Bote (including discussion about the "whole child," and an article at the following link:  http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational_leadership/sept10/vol68/num01/Seven_Essentials_for_Project-Based_Learning.aspx)

-EDCI461 with Dr. Rose Marie Codling

-words directly taken or similar to wording used in this posted source (may or may not be indicated by quotations)

-other experiences and sources I have encountered

 

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