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SpaceX Unveils Its New Dragon Spacecraft - Forbes

SpaceX Unveils Its New Dragon Spacecraft - Forbes | technology | Scoop.it
Forbes SpaceX Unveils Its New Dragon Spacecraft Forbes On Thursday evening, Elon Musk and the management team at SpaceX unveiled their new spacecraft – the Dragon version 2.
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Software That Does Science - MIT Technology Review

Software That Does Science - MIT Technology Review | technology | Scoop.it
Software That Does Science MIT Technology Review Software that read tens of thousands of research papers and then predicted new discoveries about the workings of a protein that's key to cancer could herald a faster approach to developing new drugs.
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197 Educational YouTube Channels You Should Know About - InformED

197 Educational YouTube Channels You Should Know About - InformED | technology | Scoop.it
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maybe are schol needs one

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10 Emerging Educational Technologies and How They Are Being Used Across the Globe - InformED

10 Emerging Educational Technologies and How They Are Being Used Across the Globe - InformED | technology | Scoop.it
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10 Emerging Educational Technologies and How They Are Being Used Across the Globe - InformED

10 Emerging Educational Technologies and How They Are Being Used Across the Globe - InformED | technology | Scoop.it
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Trainable Robotic Arm

Inspired by the Baxter robot, this arm can be trained to move with your own hands. Once the train button is pressed, you move the arm and gripper as needed while the Arduino stores the positions in EEPROM. After that the arm will replay the motion as needed.


Via Axel, Chris Daniell
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PC Sales Taking a Nose Dive, While Tablet Sales Soar, Says Report

PC Sales Taking a Nose Dive, While Tablet Sales Soar, Says Report | technology | Scoop.it
The future may be bleak for PC computers.
New data published by technology research firm Gartner shows that tablet sales are skyrocketing while the PC market is plummeting due to consumers demanding lower priced, all-in-one devices.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Survey: the mobile shopping apps consumers value most

Survey: the mobile shopping apps consumers value most | technology | Scoop.it
While independent developers have led innovation in mobile shopping apps, retailers, brands, and local businesses are facing an imperative — integrate high-value mobile shopping capabilities into their customers’ experiences or risk...
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very usefull for it shoping information and project analysis

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Stanford scientists build a microscope to spot the seeds of cancer

Stanford scientists build a microscope to spot the seeds of cancer | technology | Scoop.it
One of the cruelest truths about cancer is that even after you beat the disease, it can still come back to kill you. A tumor growing in the prostate gland, breast, or any other organ can shed cancerous cells into the blood. These cancerous seeds travel the body and can take root nearly anywhere, growing into a new cancer threat even after the initial cancer is treated. The rule of thumb with cancer is that the earlier you can detect the disease, the more effective the treatment, and hence better potential outcomes. Currently, doctors draw a patient's blood and analyze it using special antibodies to detect the presence of the seeds, called circulating tumor cells (CTCs). This works well if CTCs are present in large numbers, but may fail to detect smaller numbers released by earlier tumors. Now, a team of engineers, scientists and doctors from Stanford is developing a mini-microscope that might be able to noninvasively detect the CTCs earlier than ever, allowing for earlier interventions. "There has been a huge push to increase sensitivity," said Bonnie King, an instructor at Stanford School of Medicine. "We suspect that CTCs often circulate in numbers below our current threshold of detectability." A major advantage with the microscopic technique, King said, is the ability to screen much larger volumes of blood, rather than just a small vial collected from a patient. This will be done using a method called in vivo flow cytometry – a laser-based technology for counting cells in a live subject.
Via nrip
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Mohamed Haroon's curator insight, October 4, 2013 12:26 AM

Interesting Techonology - 

Pacific Cove's curator insight, October 5, 2013 6:00 AM

The rule of thumb with cancer is that the earlier you can detect the disease, the more effective the treatment, and hence better potential outcomes.

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SoundCloud - Hear the world’s sounds

Explore the largest community of artists, bands, podcasters and creators of music & audio (My new sounds: J.
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How People Spend Their Time Online [Infographic]

How People Spend Their Time Online [Infographic] | technology | Scoop.it
Check our infographic to find out How people normally spend their time online. What are the most popular online activities. How much time people spend on Internet every month and lot more.
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intriguing insight to the use of technology in todays life.

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What, Exactly, Will Wearable Apps Do?

What, Exactly, Will Wearable Apps Do? | technology | Scoop.it
Clever apps might persuade people that they need a wrist-worn computer.

 

The age of wearable computing is upon us. Forget the debate over how capable or fashionable the first devices are, how popular they may eventually become, or even whether we fully understand what we’re getting into with these devices . The big question is simply: what will they do? And the answer will have much to do with the apps that emerge.

 

Both hardware makers and software developers hope that wearables, like the smartphone, tablet, and television, will become a new platform for application development.

 

The two most promising platforms are the headset and the smart watch.

 

But while the only viable headset is Google’s still-in-beta Glass, smart watches and smart watch apps have arrived. These early smart watches may also help clarify what does and doesn’t work for software development in the broader emerging category of wearable technology.

 

Smart-watch makers also firmly believe that all wearable computing devices will get better. Samsung executives called the first model of the Galaxy Gear “a concept device,” and reports suggest that a new Galaxy Gear could appear as soon as next January’s Consumer Electronics Show.

 
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New Tools to Teach Digital Professionalism in the Age of the "Public Physician"

New Tools to Teach Digital Professionalism in the Age of the "Public Physician" | technology | Scoop.it
id you hear the one about the screaming baby on Facebook? A pediatric gastroenterologist receives a friend request from a woman in his community on his personal Facebook page. Thinking he might have met her somewhere, he asks how they know each other. “You don’t know me, but I have an 8-week-old baby who won’t stop crying and will only take 12 ounces of formula per day.” This physician knows that the wait to see a pediatric gastroenterologist can be several weeks and that 12 ounces of milk for an infant this age is a dangerously low daily intake. What should the physician do?Don’t respond to the request.Reply with the suggestion that the woman follow up with her own pediatrician.Reply with specific steps for addressing the issue.Reply with the intent of getting the child seen as soon as possible.This case study is based on the real-world experience of Bryan Vartabedian, MD, a pediatric gastroenterologist at Texas Children’s Hospital. Vartabedian was one of three digitally savvy physicians who participated in a panel discussion on digital professionalism at the AAMC’s 2013 annual meeting. The panel was moderated by Jennifer Salopek, managing editor of Wing of Zock. Vartabedian noted that the moment a newly-minted physician accepts his or her diploma and adds the letters “MD” to a Facebook profile, that doctor becomes a “public physician.” “I always assume that everything I post is publicly available,” said Vartabedian, director of digital professionalism at Baylor College of Medicine, who writes about physicians, social media, and the digital environment in his Socialized Medicine column on Wing of Zock and on his own blog, 33 Charts. Maintaining a digital presence is a role for which many physicians—those new to the profession and seasoned—are often ill-prepared. Use of digital technologies and social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter—by patients and the public as well as medical professionals—are adding a layer of complexity to how physicians behave, connect, and interact. What was once a straightforward physician-to-patient interaction has become a multi-directional engagement that includes patients, physicians, other health care providers, and the public at large, often in an online space where interactions are searchable and findable forever. Is it a complexity for which medical education is equipping its students? Not really, and certainly not consistently across the nation’s academic medical centers, Vartabedian and his fellow panelists agreed. The AAMC has taken an important step by making available a new digital professionalismtoolkit. The toolkit is authored by Vartabedian and co-panelists Neil Mehta, MD, associate professor of medicine at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, and Warren Wiechmann, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine and director of instructional technologies at University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, as well as Katherine Chretien, MD, of the Washington, DC, VA Medical Center. The goal of the toolkit is to help medical educators create awareness and dialogue about social media and digital professionalism with and among their students. The panelists agreed that the benefits of online engagement far outweigh the risks. They reminded the audience that the core issue—professionalism—is the same as it has always been; only the medium has changed. Physicians have a moral obligation to engage in online dialogue, Vartabedian said. “Physicians have two choices, really. They can participate in the discussion that is happening online and frame the story, or they can let someone else frame the story for them.” In addition to providing real-world case studies, the curriculum toolkit includes guiding questions to drive discussion, links to source material, and a high-level assessment of each case that identifies key discussion points. The toolkit is designed to be flexible; in fact, there may be no single approach to each case study. The hope is that those who use the toolkit will “share forward” by taking discussion points at their institution and sharing them to foster ongoing dialogue and evolution of the material. So, back to the screaming baby on Facebook. Vartabedian polled attendees about their chosen course of action. Many said the physician should not respond at all. Others thought directing the mom to her own pediatrician was in order. Several felt that offering specifics to address the situation would be inappropriately practicing medicine online. “How many picked ‘D?’ How many thought the doctor should arrange to have the baby seen?” All hands remained down. “No one?” Vartabedian said. “That’s what I did!” Remember the part about the case studies being flexible, perhaps without a single right answer? Visit the toolkit website, download the case studies, and start the discussion in your organization today.
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White House unveils new US space transportation policy - NBC News.com

White House unveils new US space transportation policy - NBC News.com | technology | Scoop.it
The Obama administration has outlined its strategy for maintaining what it describes as the United States' global leadership role in...
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When Can Technology Bridge The Educational Divide (EdSurge News)

When Can Technology Bridge The Educational Divide (EdSurge News) | technology | Scoop.it
Gadgets and software on its own will not improve education.
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Telemedicine robots let doctors ‘beam’ into hospitals to evaluate patients, expanding access

Telemedicine robots let doctors ‘beam’ into hospitals to evaluate patients, expanding access | technology | Scoop.it

The doctor isn’t in, but he can still see you now.

 

Remote presence robots are allowing physicians to “beam” themselves into hospitals to diagnose patients and offer medical advice during emergencies.

 

A growing number of hospitals in California and other states are using telepresence robots to expand access to medical specialists, especially in rural areas where there’s a shortage of doctors.

 

These mobile video-conferencing machines move on wheels and typically stand about 5 feet, with a large screen that projects a doctor’s face. They feature cameras, microphones and speakers that allow physicians and patients to see and talk to each other.

 

 

“Regardless of where the patient is located, we can be at their bedside in several minutes,” said Dr. Alan Shatzel, medical director of the Mercy Telehealth Network. “Literally, we compress time and space with this technology. No longer does distance affect a person’s ability to access the best care possible.”

 

 original: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/telemedicine-robots-let-doctors-beam-into-hospitals-to-evaluate-patients-expanding-access/2013/11/17/7219dda8-4f96-11e3-9ee6-2580086d8254_story.html#
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Facts and figures of the digital divide in UK - 21st Century Challenges - Royal Geographical Society with IBG

Facts and figures of the digital divide in UK - 21st Century Challenges - Royal Geographical Society with IBG | technology | Scoop.it
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very usefull

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Education Infographics | Visual.ly

Education Infographics | Visual.ly | technology | Scoop.it
Our education infographics offer a wealth of knowledge on all topics of education, from K-12 to higher education institutions.
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educational advancementss of technology

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Our Government Has Weaponized the Internet. Here's How They Did It | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Our Government Has Weaponized the Internet. Here's How They Did It | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | technology | Scoop.it

The internet backbone — the infrastructure of networks upon which internet traffic travels — went from being a passive infrastructure for communication to an active weapon for attacks.

 

According to revelations about the QUANTUM program, the NSA can “shoot” (their words) an exploit at any target it desires as his or her traffic passes across the backbone. It appears that the NSA and GCHQ were the first to turn the internet backbone into a weapon; absent Snowdens of their own, other countries may do the same and then say, “It wasn’t us. And even if it was, you started it.”

 

If the NSA can hack Petrobras, the Russians can justify attacking Exxon/Mobil. If GCHQ can hack Belgicom to enable covert wiretaps, France can do the same to AT&T. If the Canadians target the Brazilian Ministry of Mines and Energy, the Chinese can target the U.S. Department of the Interior. We now live in a world where, if we are lucky, our attackers may be every country our traffic passes through except our own.

 

Which means the rest of us — and especially any company or individual whose operations are economically or politically significant — are now targets. All cleartext traffic is not just information being sent from sender to receiver, but is a possible attack vector.

 

Here’s how it works.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Twitter is the new LinkedIn? 500K jobs posted monthly, will reach 2M/month in 2014 | VentureBeat.com

Twitter is the new LinkedIn? 500K jobs posted monthly, will reach 2M/month in 2014 | VentureBeat.com | technology | Scoop.it

Fifteen new jobs are posted to Twitter every single minute, according to a new study by social recruiting company Gozaik, and that that number has grown by 32 percent in just the last six months.

That growth rate, Gozaik cofounder Joe Budzienski says, will make Twitter the “dominant channel” for talent recruitment.

 

And it’s not just tech.

 

The biggest category of jobs that companies are recruiting on Twitter for is sales, at almost 25 percent, just edging out IT and other technology jobs. The other big category, surprisingly, is medical/dental, which accounts for almost 15 percent of all jobs posted on Twitter, Gozaik says, with jobs like anesthesiologist, orthodontist, and medical director.

 

Budzienski understands that might sound surprising to some:

“They are recruiting surgeons on Twitter and top-notch oncologists — many roles you don’t even see on LinkedIn,” he told me. “There are a lot of professionals on Twitter who blog and tweet about the medical field, so therefore you get lots of announcements coming out in the hopes that these individuals will see them.”

 

At existing growth rates, Twitter will reach two million job postings a month, Budzienski says. And he’s building an enterprise platform to help companies manage who they’re targeting in an otherwise fairly random and chaotic sea of 500 million tweets a day.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Cyber-crime cost companies about $11.56M in 2013

Cyber-crime cost companies about $11.56M in 2013 | technology | Scoop.it
A new study shows that U.S. companies spent an average of $11.56 million in 2013 on cyber-attacks, according to FedScoop.

Via John Merchant, CPA, Jim Wesberry
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John Merchant, CPA's curator insight, October 10, 2013 9:20 AM

The most common cyber-crimes were caused by denial-of-service attacks, insiders and Web-based intrusions.  This cost is a 25% increase over 2012 numbers.

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Leap: Time to wave away the mouse?

Leap: Time to wave away the mouse? | technology | Scoop.it

“Leap Motion - a small sensor that allows PCs to be controlled with gestures - wants to revolutionise the way you use your computer.”


Via Guillaume Decugis, Chris Daniell
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360Logica's comment, August 29, 2013 10:29 AM
nice article about future technology!
360Logica's curator insight, August 29, 2013 10:30 AM

nice!

Michael Allenberg's curator insight, September 3, 2013 9:39 PM

I have one and I must say that this truly does feel like the "ground-floor" of NUI computing... Not perfect yet, the apps will get better. Waiting on better integration with existing OS, however it is off to a great start!

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Internet Archives - Web Design Dubai - Dubai Web Design and Web Application Development Company

Internet Archives - Web Design Dubai - Dubai Web Design and Web Application Development Company | technology | Scoop.it
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Evaluating authentic mobile apps for learning

Evaluating authentic mobile apps for learning | technology | Scoop.it

I also believe that encouraging students to get 'hands on' with authentic apps has a much more important role in helping them to develop digital literacies which they can use outside of the classroom.


Via Nik Peachey
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olgadiez's curator insight, October 7, 2013 11:02 AM

Criterios para evaluar apps reales y aplicarlas en educación.  Muy interesante.

Kelly Pickering's curator insight, October 7, 2013 11:46 PM

Great measurement options here.

Dean Mantz's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:40 AM

Thanks to Nik Peachey for sharing this via his Scoop.it site "Learning Technology News".