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Eyes in the Back of Your Head

Eyes in the Back of Your Head | Technology | Scoop.it
“A company called Skully Helmets has unveiled a new and very cool helmet called the Skully P1.”
Via Guillaume Decugis
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▶ MYO - Wearable Gesture Control from Thalmic Labs

Thalmic Labs' Myo is a gesture control armband that works out of the box with things you already have like your Mac, Windows PC, iPhone and Android. The Myo Armband uses Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy to communicate with the devices it's paired with so you can control presentations, video, content, games, and so much more! It features on-board, rechargeable Lithium-Ion batteries, an ARM processor, our proprietary muscle activity sensors and a 9-axis inertial measurement unit.The first MYO units aren’t expected to ship until the early part of 2014, but in the meantime Thalmic Labs has launched a developer program to expand the number of apps available to users at launch. Anyone who is selected for the scheme will gain early access to the various MYO APIs and early product documentation; a “very select group” will also receive pre-production armbands sometime this summer.It’s therefore up to third-party developers to integrate dual-MYO support for their various apps. It’s a difficult decision – supporting two armbands exclusively could help to differentiate an app and improve user uptake – but it could also sideline a number of users that only own a single device. If programmers decide to support both single and dual-MYO armbands, however, the resulting app could also be rather half-baked or unfocused.Using two MYOs at once has clear benefits for a number of different areas of modern computing though, including video games, 3D modeling and music creation. It’ll be interesting to see what developers come up with in the months ahead.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Basic Device Simply Fixes the Touchscreen Problem | Gadgets, Science & Technology

Basic Device Simply Fixes the Touchscreen Problem | Gadgets, Science & Technology | Technology | Scoop.it
“ Basic Device Simply Fixes the Touchscreen Problem”
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Streaming, crowdfunding and wearable gadgets ruled technology in 2013 - Toronto Star

Streaming, crowdfunding and wearable gadgets ruled technology in 2013 - Toronto Star | Technology | Scoop.it
“Toronto Star Streaming, crowdfunding and wearable gadgets ruled technology in 2013 Toronto Star Technology has invaded every facet of our lives, with Apple launches becoming a sort of quarterly Super Bowl for our tech fetishism.”
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Coin: a step closer to getting rid of my wallet

Coin: a step closer to getting rid of my wallet | Technology | Scoop.it
"Coin is a connected device that can hold and behave like the cards you already carry. Coin works with your debit cards, credit cards, gift cards, loyalty cards and membership cards. Instead of carrying several cards you carry one Coin. Multiple accounts and information all in one place."
Via Jim Lerman, Guillaume Decugis
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P12 Jetpack Will Be Available To Buy In two years for $200k

P12 Jetpack Will Be Available To Buy In two years for $200k | Technology | Scoop.it
New Zealand-based Martin Aircraft's latest re-design of its Jetpack—the P12, technically still a prototype, the P12 is promised to be very close to the final version of the Martin Jetpack that could be available commercially sometime in mid-2014.
Via Guillaume Decugis
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Coin: a step closer to getting rid of my wallet

Coin: a step closer to getting rid of my wallet | Technology | Scoop.it
"Coin is a connected device that can hold and behave like the cards you already carry. Coin works with your debit cards, credit cards, gift cards, loyalty cards and membership cards. Instead of carrying several cards you carry one Coin. Multiple accounts and information all in one place."
Via Jim Lerman, Guillaume Decugis
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Pars Rescue Robot Prototype Tested

Pars Rescue Robot Prototype Tested | Technology | Scoop.it
“ You may recall our story in March of this year that described the Pars rescue robot concept developed by RTS Lab in Tehran, Iran.”
Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Plastic-Eating Mushrooms Could Clear up Persistent Garbage | Gadgets, Science & Technology

Plastic-Eating Mushrooms Could Clear up Persistent Garbage | Gadgets, Science & Technology | Technology | Scoop.it
“ Plastic-Eating Mushrooms Could Clear up Persistent Garbage (Plastic eating mushrooms eat garbage!”
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Insulin pill may soon become a reality

Insulin pill may soon become a reality | Technology | Scoop.it
The idea of oral insulin has been around since the 1930s, but the difficulties of making it seemed too big to overcome. First, insulin is a protein – when it comes in contact with stomach enzymes, it is quickly destroyed. Second, if insulin can pass through the stomach safely, it is too big a molecule (about 30 times the size of aspirin) to be absorbed into the bloodstream, where it needs to be in order to regulate blood-sugar levels.Sanyog Jain at India’s National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research and his colleagues have been working on delivering insulin in the oral form for many years. Their first fully-successful attempt came in 2012, when they developed a formulation that successfully controlled blood-sugar level in rats. But the materials used were too expensive to consider commercialising the technology.Now, in a paper published in the journal Biomacromolecules, they have found a cheaper and more reliable way of delivering insulin. They overcome the two main hurdles by, first, packing insulin in tiny sacs made of lipids (fats), and, second, attaching to it folic acid (vitamin B9) to help improve its absorption into the bloodstream.The lipids they use are cheap and have been successfully employed to deliver other drugs before. These help to protect insulin from being digested by stomach enzymes, which gets it to the small intestine. When the lipid-covered sacs enter the small intestine, special cells on its lining called microfold cells are attracted to the folic acid in them. The folic acid helps activate a transport mechanism that can let big molecules pass through into the blood. The amount of folic acid used in the formulation also seems to be in the safe region.In rats, Jain’s formulation was as effective as injected insulin, although the relative amounts that entered the blood stream differed. However, it was better in one key aspect. Whereas the effects of an injection are quickly lost (in less than 6 to 8 hours), Jain’s formulation helped control blood-sugar level for more than 18 hours.The most important part of the research comes after successful testing in animals – the formulation needs to be given to human volunteers. But, Jain said, “at a government institute like ours, we don’t have the sort of money needed for clinical trials.”He may not have to wait for long, as big pharma companies have been searching for an insulin pill formulation for decades. Two of them, Danish pharma giant Novo Nordisk and Israeli upstart Oramed are in a race to come up with a solution. Google’s venture capital arm, Google Ventures, recently invested $10m in Rani Therapeutics with the hope it will help develop oral insulin. Indian firm Biocon also does oral insulin research, and it recently signed an agreement with pharma giant Bristol-Myers Squibb.Oramed is ahead, with their oral insulin product soon to enter phase-II clinical trials, which is the most advanced stage any oral insulin formulation has ever reached. Its chief scientist, Miriam Kidron, said of Jain’s research: “Most people have the same basic idea to develop an insulin pill, but its the little differences that will determine ultimate success.”While Kidron did not reveal Oramed’s formulation, she said, “we attempted liposomal delivery before, just like Jain’s work, but we weren’t successful.” She warned that translating success from rats to humans is very difficult. And she is right – most drugs have a high cull-rate at each stage of their development. Even so, research like Jain’sgive hope that an insulin pill may not remain a dream for long.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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