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4 reasons why hybrid is becoming the new normal - Thoughts On Cloud

At IBM Interconnect 2015 we heard the prediction that “cloud” will become the common name for what is known today as “hybrid cloud.” In other words, there will be no division between public and private clouds; every cloud will be a combination of the two, either with or without a traditional IT infrastructure. My colleague …
Chris Crafford's insight:

Hybrid cloud is a very practical way for corporations and public services to scale services and applications that are constrained in their current operating environments. The also offer excellent ways for teams to move to DevOps practices, and to start migrating business critical apps to CNA approaches by implementing selected microservices to address urgent features, scaling and performance issues. 


VMware's vCloud Air makes creating a hybrid cloud even easier for most enterprises, with ~90% of corporate data centers already using key VMware products, the expansion to vCloud Air could not be more straightforward allowing existing services, operations tools and resources to manage the added public cloud resources in a familiar manner.


Hybrid cloud is the future for corporations.  Waiting for something else to come along is not a viable strategy.  Your competitors are already gaining significant agility and cost advantages using Hybrid cloud.  The time to act is now.

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Uber’s epic DB blunder is hardly an exception. GitHub is awash in passwords

Uber’s epic DB blunder is hardly an exception. GitHub is awash in passwords | Technology | Scoop.it
The domain names in this post have been redacted to protect the stupid careless.
Chris Crafford's insight:

I another recent post I mentioned that my belief that people are still at the core of security issues.  This incident,plus the thousands of similar instances in Github, plainly illustrate the immensity of the challenge.


The software developers that put this code into Github are all generally highly educated, most should be security aware and many have taken software security training in how to write code that is secure. However, they still do unbelievably dumb things like this.  I don;t think it is malicious or intentional.  They are simply not thinking about their actions.  In the need for speed and ease of getting their work done they do what is simplest. 


The consequence is potentially exposing information that can be used to exploit the company they work for or in some cases their own systems.


So the question and problem we have to address overall is how do we raise not just security awareness in people, but how do we change their behavior to choose ways of doing the things they need to do in rational but secure ways. We can add all the technology we can invent, but while the behavior of humans remain unpredictable and quite frankly unreliable, security breaches will continue to be part of our lives.

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The Modern Pattern

The Modern Pattern | Technology | Scoop.it
We have seen a significant shift in many aspects of our lives as a direct result of massive technology shifts over the past 10 years or so, and much more is coming. In looking at many of these drivers, and more specifically at Cloud, DevOps, Security there is a common theme that has emerged in fundamental approach and thinking.As a developer and later development manager one of the key focuses was quality and elimination of ALL errors. The goal many organizations strived for was error free product delivery. With a little thought it is clear that error free software is asking for perfection fr
Chris Crafford's insight:

I posted this on LInkedIn earlier today. Feedback welcome.

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Why Allowing Telecommuting Is (And Isn’t) A Good Idea | Paul Petrone | LinkedIn

Why Allowing Telecommuting Is (And Isn’t) A Good Idea | Paul Petrone | LinkedIn | Technology | Scoop.it

Via Danielle M. Villegas
Chris Crafford's insight:

I could not agree more.  There are plenty of jobs that are done as well, if not better on a telecommuting basis. I work as a consultant in a high tech company.  Part of my job is to be onsite with my clients, but when I am not, my team and I all work from home.  We schedule in office meetings when it will be beneficial to the work and serve the client more effectively.  On average it turns out having a face to face meeting about once a month is more than sufficient. 


We use several chat and virtual presence tools to be in constant communication during the day as a team and with the customer.  We have one internally for in-team discussion and a public one with the client's team.  


I have worked in the office for years in other roles and there are clearly situations and functions that benefit from being together as a team, but having a one size fits all approach and policy is a bad choice for a company in my view. 


Watching the trends in the market as the millennial move into the job market adds another wrinkle. Many millennial don't want to be tied to the "big corporation" for many years of their life. Many prefer more of a free agent style.  I suspect we will see many of them work for home for multiple "employers" sometime simultaneously. 


Not only must corporations find the best arrangement for the work they need done, the need to adapt to the new generation of workers that are much less motivated by money and status symbols than by doing challenging and innovative work.

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Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, January 29, 2015 7:59 PM

This was an interesting article I found on LinkedIn--and I don't agree with it. The author states, "...working-from-home can stifle the synergy that comes from having a bunch of smart people in the same place together, which in turn can hurt innovation. And that is reason enough to not allow employees to work from home, at least all the time," as the primary reason to discourage telecommuting. My own experience begs to differ. 


I've worked from home now for just over two years now. Only in the last year was I required to come into the office once a week, versus the once a month that I made a point of doing the first year. The home office is rather far away--during rush hour, it can take about an hour and a half from my house to the office, or vice versa. I don't feel that my creativity or innovation has been hurt by being at the office. In fact, it's rare that a trip to the office has offered anything for ME to be innovative. If anything, I'm bringing some innovation to other people. There have been many times that I've wondered why the heck I was even in the office other than to make a personal appearance. I actually lose working hours because of the commute to try to beat the traffic and get the commute time down a little bit. Sometimes it can be productive, because I can be in a meeting with a person, and it's easier to talk about visuals when we don't have to telecast it via a conferencing app. But it isn't that often. Those trips I don't mind, but innovative? No, not for me. I definitely am able to get a lot more done, both creatively and efficiently from home. 


There are certainly jobs that do flourish more in the group activity of being in the office. But mine isn't one of them. And there are a lot of jobs I've had where I feel like, yeah, I didn't need to be in the office to do them, but this was before the advent of telecommuting even existed. 


Part of the issue is that employers fail to see telecommuting as a viable and profitable option. It's not for all jobs, but I'm willing to bet that there are a lot of tech comm jobs that really don't need to be in the big ol' office building, at least not on the level I'm at. I'm able to keep up pretty well with conference and regular phone calls, instant messaging, and email just fine, thank you. Heck, in many instances, I have to work that way, even if I was in the office, because I work with people globally--I can't be in the same room as them as they are in a different country or state! I think the bigger problem is that employers don't realize how telecommuters CAN bring something innovative to the table. I know I push a lot issues at work about, "Why isn't this done? Why isn't that done?" To me, they are valid things that would help with workstreams or innovation, if you want to call it that, but I have no voice. I'm not allowed to have a voice. I'm seen as a worker bee, nothing more. I can contribute to innovation, but you need to be willing to hear me when I say--or write, or instant message--an idea. Just because I'm physically in an office wouldn't change that--not really. 


I'm a huge advocate of telecommuting because for me, there have been more pros than cons. The cons are me having to drive 50 miles away once a week just to sit at a desk and do the same things I do at home. I don't connect with my group--I'm not even allowed to sit with them, so what's the point? My manager just feels better if I make an appearance. 


Now, this is not to say that if I got a job in the future that was closer to home that I wouldn't go into the office everyday. Sure, I would! I'd go in.  But don't diss telecommuting. If I could telecommute for the rest of my life, I would. I don't know if that's going to be possible, but I've liked it much better, and I feel that I've grown and been much more productive as a result of being able to do my own thing. 

--techcommgeekmom

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2014 Breaks Heat Record, Challenging Global Warming Skeptics

2014 Breaks Heat Record, Challenging Global Warming Skeptics | Technology | Scoop.it
Extreme land temperatures were accompanied by an unusually warm ocean surface virtually everywhere except around Antarctica, scientists reported.
Chris Crafford's insight:

The doubters can quibble about the exact temperatures and if the new record is significant or not, but the fact that ice in the Arctic and most glaziers are disappearing before our very eyes is hard to deny or explain in other ways.  The increasing extreme weather, heat and cold, intensity of storms is what we need to be paying attention to. The way we build our homes and plan cities, where we build them and how and where we will be cultivating food should be what the discussion is about. Arguing over the exact temperature is of little consequence when tornados and hurricanes are ripping your house to shreds, and there is no food to eat.

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Marketing and Communications of a Successful IT Provider | VMware CloudOps - VMware Blogs

Marketing and Communications of a Successful IT Provider | VMware CloudOps - VMware Blogs | Technology | Scoop.it
Start your own IT marketing campaign now to manage how your company views IT and to drive change—communication is vital to being a service-driven IT org.
Chris Crafford's insight:

My work focuses on helping teams make the transition to CI/CD/DevOps. While there is a technological piece to these transitions, the really hard part of any DevOps transformation is the changes that need to occur in mindsets, culture and processes.


Driving change in most organizations is hard,  Communication is a vital piece of driving changes in any organization. This post from Alex lays out some great communication tools and advice for any leader in a team or organization that is headed down the DevOps transformation path. 


Understanding your customers and building a clear vision and message and growing evangelists are all key things you will need to establish and grow. 


Equip yourself with the best communication tools as you head out on the DevOps journey, and the path will be clearer and easier to follow, and when you run into obstacles you will have a team around you to help get past it.

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Microsoft Says Windows Will Run Docker, the Next Big Thing in Cloud Computing | WIRED

Microsoft Says Windows Will Run Docker, the Next Big Thing in Cloud Computing | WIRED | Technology | Scoop.it
The next big thing in cloud computing doesn’t work with Microsoft’s Windows operating system. But Microsoft wants to change that. As part of its ongoing effort to embrace the latest tech trends, Microsoft says it’s building a version of Windows that will offer something akin to Docker—a technology originally created for the Linux operating system…
Chris Crafford's insight:

This is a great step in the right direction for Microsoft. I am convinced that Docker type containers will become a key app deployment technique in most enterprises over next few years.  Microsoft was about to be left out of the game.  This gives them a chance to be part of the shift to app containers.


My concern is with the following form this article:

"As Zander explains it, the addition of this technology means you’ll be able to more efficiently run software across a large number of machines, much as you can with Docker on Linux. But, naturally, the containers that run atop Windows will be different from those than run atop Linux. According to Solomon Hykes—the driving force behind the Docker project and the chief technology officer of startup that runs it—this means you won’t have the power to move Docker containers from a Windows machine to a Linux machine, or vice versa."


If I can't move my containers between Windows and Linux some of the real power and operational value of app containers is not realized. This limitation may turn out to be an achilles heal for Microsoft if they stick to this approach.


What do you think?

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3 Takeaways from Velocity New York 2014 (and What this Means for APM Solutions)

3 Takeaways from Velocity New York 2014 (and What this Means for APM Solutions) | Technology | Scoop.it
While exhibiting with the SmartBear AlertSite UXM team in Velocity last week, I managed to skip away from the booth quite a bit to squeeze in as many sessions as possible. The more sessions I attended, the more some common themes started materializing. The three themes that finally emerged are all very different, but are ultimately all related at the end of the day.
Chris Crafford's insight:

Great observations by Laura.  Projects I have work don over the past year support her observations.


Large companies are struggling with the increasing complexity of systems and services, especially under the tremendous pressure from the business folks to do things much more quickly, and demands for great agility. They often need outside help to recognize the issues and help them address them. Fundamental shifts are needed. (See later comments).


On the topic of failure, if you want to build systems quickly (with quality of course), part of the core design and service construction must assume anything the service depends on WILL fail.  This has to become a core requirement in all software development. Especially true as you move to mircoservices.  Failure of a microservice should not cause the overall service being delivered to the end user to fail.  Maybe there is temporary degradation of performance or capabilities, but full failure is no longer acceptable.  This is a big midst shift for architects and developers.


The third point on organizational change is spot on too. If you want your overall organization to be agile and deliver new services to you customers quickly, the old silos, turf wars and other large company behaviors of the past need to be put aside. Collaborative working and true teams that support and work together are need.  People need to be smart, constantly learning and delivering.  No prima donnas (individuals or teams) allowed.

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Developers, you need to be more predictable

Developers, you need to be more predictable | Technology | Scoop.it
The chief operating officer of Pivotal Labs, Edward Hieatt, has some pithy advice for development teams -- and a new metric to go along with it.
Chris Crafford's insight:

I think it is a great objective to have consistent delivery from our development teams. Clearly 100% variance from week to week in team productivity is not good and makes it impossible for anybody to manage product rollout etc.  However, this call for developers to be more consistent does not look at the whole picture, and may in reality be an unreasonable expectation.  

 

Firstly developers are not the only stakeholders in the game, and the delivery in any one week may depend as much on the devleopers putting in the work as on the Product managers and other business stakeholders doing theirs.

 

Secondly the work done fomr week to week varies for many teams. Depending on the  what you building, and the where tha tproduct is i it overall lifecycle, the mix of tasks and outcomes may vary greatly.

 

Thirdly, teams in most organizations are always in flux today.  As members come and go the tema Velocity/productivity will vary.

 

I think if you look at the teams that have delivered well and "consistently" are teams where all the players contribute consistently and everybody is held accountable for delivering. In today's world it is the whole team that delivers, not a few heros coding through the night and delivering some code at the last moment.  The tools and exact details of the process are less important than the team, its members, and their commiment  to deliver.

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3 Trends That Will Make Life Harder for CIOs in 2014

3 Trends That Will Make Life Harder for CIOs in 2014 | Technology | Scoop.it
Robots, 3-D printers and wearable tech are indeed cool, but they should raise red flags for IT leaders. Here's how these emerging technologies will cause operations, privacy and user policy headaches for CIOs in 2014.
Chris Crafford's insight:

Some very interesting concerns are raised here. For most companies I think the issues around wearable devices will be the most challenging and hit sooner than the others. Banning these devices is not realistic in most environments, so containing their use and potential issues is the most practical way to go.

 

The "always on" cameras and voice recording are clearly signifcant issues.  They clearly present security challenges, but I can also see them becoming issues on the HR front. These devices will definitely push the boundaries of what is considered acceptable versus intrusive by peers.

 

With respect to 3D scanning and printing the Intellectual Property controls will require significant revisions and education on what is acceptable use and what is not will be required. Given the amazing things people have done with copiers and faxes in the past, the mind boogles at what thye will do with 3D scanners/printers. New awareness and rules willbe needed.

 

My brian is alreayd hurting!

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The boy whose brain could unlock autism — Matter — Medium

The boy whose brain could unlock autism — Matter — Medium | Technology | Scoop.it
SOMETHING WAS WRONG with Kai Markram. At five days old, he seemed like an unusually alert baby, picking his head up and looking around long…
Chris Crafford's insight:

Autism diagnosis is increasing every year. Historically it has been viewed as negative condition - a disability. This new theory about what is really going on offers a very different view that may offer parents learning to live with and raise an autistic child new tools and a positive outlook for the future of their child.

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Catcher in the ROI: Bringing Back Workplace Mojo

Catcher in the ROI: Bringing Back Workplace Mojo | Technology | Scoop.it
Have you ever watched a friend or former colleague lose their mojo in their work? Their fire and brimstone replaced with dull malaise. Their struggle to summon the energy just to talk about their c...
Chris Crafford's insight:

Having a clear definition of what success means for your organization and then striving for it at all times, together with the other behaviours listed here most definitely works.  I have seen it happen when all the ingredients are there. Delivering a meaningful service/product that really makes a difference in peoples lives is inspiring to us all and drives us to give all we have.

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Forbes claims that Windows Phone would beat iOS in three years

Forbes claims that Windows Phone would beat iOS in three years | Technology | Scoop.it
While Microsoft has been regularly reassuring the rise of the Windows Phone platform, given the dominance of Android and iOS, not many believed that it would be possible.
Chris Crafford's insight:

While 366% growth sounds impressive, a big percentage of nothing is still a very little.  Having used a new Nokia Windows phone I agree it is very slick and a great phone.

 

While Windows mobile has had very good growth in Europe versus the US, the success of the WIndows strategy is that you need to buy into the whole Microsoft ecosystem. When looking at the market today, you are not just picking a phone when you buy one, you are most often committing the to vendors whole ecosystem, i.e. Apple, Google or Microsoft product family. While these devices do work cross-platform, for the best experience you need to stay with the same vendor when working across the services and platforms. For example using Word on Office 365 from any Windows device is mostly great, don't bother to try it on an iPAD.

 

Just looking at phone growth in isolation is not likely to be the whole story.  Remember Windows OS sales are down about 10% in the past 12 months, and most forecasts are not pretty. We still need to see how the new XBOX does. The inital launch and missteps with it have been well documented.

 

Forbes may be right, but displacing both iOS and Andriod, with their accompaning ecosystems, is going ot hard for a company that has stumbled recently with new product rollouts.

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The great IT myth: is cloud really less secure than on-premise? | Information Age

The great IT myth: is cloud really less secure than on-premise? | Information Age | Technology | Scoop.it
As the debate regarding security in the cloud rolls on for the umpteenth year, Information Age seeks a definitive answer
Chris Crafford's insight:

This is a great assessment of the current views on cloud security without diving deep into technical issues. While I agree with most of the sentiments expressed by multiple folks, the comment that resonates the most with me is the following: 


‘Unless there are some other big stories, hopefully things will settle down. As shown above, humans are the problem when it comes to security breaches, and more needs to be done to improve awareness of social engineering. The larger the organisation, the greater the opportunity there will be to get in that way.’
- Jack Bedell-Pearce, managing director, 


Regardless of where your data is, you own responsibility for it, and just like dealing with the people based failures in-house, you need to deal with the same issues in the cloud.


I do not think the cloud is inherently less secure.  As many have pointed out that well run cloud environments may be more secure than many in-house systems. Simply by being physically remote and the operators are unknown to most employees in a corporation, one of the links in the people failure chain is broken.


As more parts of corporations subscribe to a plethora of cloud based services, data security will rapidly move from the domain of the IT organization to all management, as every department will have data in one or more external clouds soon.  Security is stepping out of the shadows and becoming a front and center differentiator for cloud providers, but also for the management and leaders of the future.

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How Malware Bypasses Detection Tools

How Malware Bypasses Detection Tools | Technology | Scoop.it
Companies are spending millions on malware-detection software only to find that more than one-half of breaches still occur through their browsers.
Chris Crafford's insight:

Most people in the IT business with any security exposure knows that most malware tools are failing at protecting us, almost by definition because they mostly protect us for things that happened in the past.  By that I mean they can find things identified in the past, so they cannot protect us against threats unknown or not yet understood. Clearly the latter is essential impossible to fix. The whole malware industry knows that their tools are only offering partial protection, but the problem is enormous and probably unsolvable at present. 


The web based malware is even more challenging to address in my opinion.  There are secure browsers out there, but they are not widely used or known.  I would suggest that most corporate users (and even IT teams) could not name a single secure browser. Their use is limited to a tiny percentage of aware or paranoid users. The web browser environment is further complicated by the fact that the end user can mess with settings and can take actions that will hurt them or the corporation due to lack of knowledge, awareness, or simply could not be bothered to follow guidelines and rules. As is most often the case the biggest flaw in most security solutions is the human element.


This is exposing corporations and individuals in ways we have not had to manage before, with the end user being central to the problem. Traditional approaches are unlikely to solve this problem.  New thinking and approaches are needed. The challenge is before us.

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Healthcare data security: Is cloud encryption alone enough?

Healthcare data security: Is cloud encryption alone enough? | Technology | Scoop.it
What if the data of 80 million Anthem subscribers were encrypted at rest? And access required two-factor authentication? Would the security breach still have occurred? These lines in the new cyber-security “anthem” are being sung with gusto by those following the bouncing cursor of a breach that may be larger than all healthcare security breaches of the last ten years combined.
Chris Crafford's insight:

There is no doubt that our medical records and data are a lucrative target for thieves and hackers.  I also agree that encryption is not sufficient.  Encryption is one of many tools to be used in a thought out security strategy or plan. 


As this post points out there are many ways to get to the data in the clear too. 


It should be remembered that the majority of cyber fraud is still committed by "insiders", i.e. corporate employees. Humans still remain the single weak point in all security measures. 


A colleague recently shared with me that there had been a spate of identity theft cases in the company he worked for. The spike in cases lead them to investigate internally.   The reality they discovered was that anybody with access to an internal HR shared drive could easily get to a spreadsheet with employees SSN, names, addresses etc.  A quick photo with their smartphone of the screen and they have all the data needed to make a lot of people's lives a misery. 


Similarly other key data can easily be stolen and used.  Many other attaches have exploited human errors or lack of awareness and are well documented. 


I personally do just about all my business electronically and am as careful with my information as possible. That does not mean I am safe.  My information will get hacked, and probably already has.  What I better know is what am I going to do about it when I discover it.


The same is true for corporations.  If you think you can't or have not been hacked, wake up.  It has already happened, you just have not detected it yet.  Just like DR and Business Continuity, you need a detailed plan of action on what to do once the issue occurs.  You cannot stop it completely.  You can make it harder but the determined hacker WILL get in and do damage.  Your challenge is detecting it as quickly as possible, minimizing the damage and cleaning up the mess.  That is the reality we live in today. 

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9 Cloud Trends For 2015

9 Cloud Trends For 2015 | Technology | Scoop.it
In 2015, expect to see the cloud mature as a platform for hybrid operations, with cloud data centers achieving new efficiencies through containers.
Chris Crafford's insight:

This is a pretty good list.  As a practitioner of DevOps transformations and user of cloud technology for many years I agree with most of the predictions. 


The move from agile development to continuous delivery is one we have been seeing and living in leading companies for the past few years, but as more and more see the value in moving to Continuous Integration, then Continuous Delivery and for many Continuous Deployment the demand for skills in these techniques will grow rapidly. 


To head down the Continuous road you ideally need to be an agile based culture already.  If you are not the road is longer and harder.  But be warned, the transition to "Continuous" is all about changing the base culture of your organization that requires serious commitment and work by the leadership and everybody in the teams. Yes there are some cool tools that you will start using, but they are their to support the transformation. If you do not work on the cultural and process changes first and foremost, you will fail. 

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Docker or Rocket for containers? Why not both?

Docker or Rocket for containers? Why not both? | Technology | Scoop.it
While Docker and CoreOS have been fighting to own the container market, the two offer different approaches that complement as much as they compete
Chris Crafford's insight:

Containers, especially the Libcontainer component is and will be a key element of application deployment going forward. There is little doubt about that.  While CoreOS is waving the flag of security and Docker that of usability, I think a bit element that i don't se in the conversation for the Enterprise is operational manageability. 


One of the customers I am currently working with deploys > 10,000 servers to support it's end user applications, as primarily a B2C service. Adding Containers into that mix may be useful for them, but they need tools to manage containers at that scale. Other companies and teams are addressing these issues.


To me this is symptomatic of many software projects.  They have a great idea and deliver useful capabilities, and for client facing apps there is a lot of attention to UX usability now, but operational support and usability is still not in the picture for many, if not most development teams.


This is were a DevOps culture and mindset should have significant impact going forward. As the Operations folks become embedded din the overall development process and have early involvement they can bring this awareness to the process and add requirements that'll make automated operation support much easier.

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6 Challenges Facing DevOps and Operations Teams in 2015

6 Challenges Facing DevOps and Operations Teams in 2015 | Technology | Scoop.it
To say that Operations and DevOps will have a new set of challenges in the coming year is a bit redundant, as their entire job is based on solving problems and facing challenges. However the current and future landscape of tools, technologies, and processes is changing dramatically. While this has always been true, it’s the pace that is problematic. Additionally, the pressure from business users who believe everything is solved with an “app” has moved from annoying to destructive.
Chris Crafford's insight:

Thought provoking post Chris Riley. I would add some comments on 3 of these: Culture, Tools and Legacy.


Changing the culture in an organization is never easy and to be successful in migrating to a full DevOps way of working and delivering software this is the biggest and hardest change everybody faces. The challenges  you face are well known: why should we change? What is in it for me? How does this make the company more successful?  I like doing what I do no now? This is hard and I don't have the skills? My best friends company tried this and it was a disaster! Driving cultural change requires total commitment and buy in from everybody, the management as well as individual contributors. If you are not effective at identifying the needed cultural changes in your organization and then providing the leadership to getting them enacted as the new way, your DevOps road will run into a cliff.


Tools are a key enabler in the path to DevOps, but remember they are an enabler.  Just because your team is using the latest whizz-bang tool  of the week does not mean you doing DevOps.  Getting to Continuous Integration/Testing/Delivery/Deployment is hard work for everybody, but the payoff is worth it. Do not get into religious wars on tools and be ready to change them frequently.  Tools may be one of the more volatile areas going forward with new tools coming to market almost daily.


Legacy apps and systems are an unavoidable beast on this journey.  In many organizations the processes around the legacy apps are deeply entrenched waterfall like and stable.  The amount of change for these may not justify the work to migrate the teams that support these, but migrating the teams whose services/apps connect and integrate with the legacy apps may be.  Pick your battles.  The best way to migrate  the legacy app may be to start planning migration off it to a new SaaS version. Dinosaurs don't like moving or being moved.  They belong in museums, not vibrant successful companies.

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Will Docker Become the Lingua Franca of Cloud? | LinkedIn

Will Docker Become the Lingua Franca of Cloud? | LinkedIn | Technology | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

Great points Sam. I agree with you on the role Docker can play in helping avoid the vendor lock-in issue.  


I think it may also have a significant role to play in the one of the other big issues for public clouds and that is how do I get my legacy apps to run there, assuming that is a need and brings benefits to my users and company. I would love to hear what other folks think about using Docker for legacy app migration and if they see a significant rise in Docker usage for suck migrations?

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DevOps Engineer? What Is That Supposed To Mean? - Cloudyn

DevOps Engineer? What Is That Supposed To Mean? - Cloudyn | Technology | Scoop.it
Chris Crafford's insight:

While I agree that DevOps is more of a culture and approach to working, I disagree with the notion that you do not need DevOps Engineers. Yes DevOps is about teams working together and delivering as a team, but the skills and experience needed to be effective in the DevOps role are different to being a full stack or UX developer. A good DevOps Engineer is first and foremost a good Engineer, has deep operational and networking skills, is a good developer, and has the needed soft skills in communication, team building. DevOps engineers work closely with all the team members to improve efficiency in how product is delivered through automation of not just the release process, but all the associated infrastructure and tools. Increasingly they are also the folks that teach others about development best practices around optimizing product performance versus cost, especially for cloud deployment.

 

For DevOps to be truly successful I agree the overall organization has to embrace the DevOps culture. 

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2014: The Resurrection of Enterprise IT – 11 Cloud Computing Predictions

2014: The Resurrection of Enterprise IT – 11 Cloud Computing Predictions | Technology | Scoop.it
Enterprise IT organizations today often are bypassed as employees and LoBs use cloud services; in fact cloud computing is considered the revenge of the business unit.
Chris Crafford's insight:

Even though this set of predictions are from a vendor, and hence seen through their lens, I agree with the thinking and predictions set out here. Cloud adoption is occuring at breakneck speed and IT orgnaizations cannot stand in the way.  Your job in IT is to make the business successful and leverage all the resources availalbe to achive that success.

 

Security of cloud based data through encryption, managing the keys, and being able to know where your data has been and is going will be fundamental to managing and protecting your company. 

 

In addition to Cloud based solutons and data, the continued growth of mobile, BYOD, social media, analytics, the emergence of wearable devices, and always on recording of voice and video will further complicate the challenges for the IT team in the future.

 

IT teams have a massive transformation to make in skills and the services they provide, but companies will need them even more as the new ways of doing business keeps changing and become more complex.  

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2014: More bad news coming for 'old IT' as cloud dominates | ZDNet

2014: More bad news coming for 'old IT' as cloud dominates | ZDNet | Technology | Scoop.it
Cloud and offshore delivery continue to drive down cost as companies look to shake off the shackles of their existing tech infrastructure.
Chris Crafford's insight:

I see this happening in my daily life.  We have a legacy data center and all new development is going to the Cloud.  The DevOps team is growing in skills, impact and criticality to the buisness. The trap you should not fall into is to stop spending time, resources and money on the legacy DC and focus just on the Cloud.  Over the past 18 months we went from 110 physical servers to less than 40, all delivering services via virtualized services. In practice the DC world and the Cloud world look very similar to our IT teams and Developers. The migration will continue.

 

The core remaining applications in the DC are mainly legacy ERP and CRM systems, and old in-house applications that are rapidly being replaced by new Cloud based apps.

 

For the ERP systems the inertia is immense, but it is time to look around at cloud based ERP, CRM and other backoffice services. Moving your legacy ERP servers to the Cloud, while technically possible, may not be a good idea. Many of these older systems were not architected to run in these environments and are very I/O intensive both at the frontend and backend. 

 

Your best option may be to look at newer offerings that were built in the cloud and designed to be used by users in a broad spectrum of network quality of service. You may be pleasantly surpised at what you find, and your buisness partners may value the flexibilty and ease of use in these systems versus the old ERP systems.

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Big Idea 2014: The Distinction Between Media and Tech Crumbles

Big Idea 2014: The Distinction Between Media and Tech Crumbles | Technology | Scoop.it
This post is part of a series in which LinkedIn Influencers pick one big idea that will shape 2014. See all the ideas here.What will define media and technology in 2014? The end of defining labels.
Chris Crafford's insight:

I totally agree with Julia. I will take it a bit further to say that media is not only merging with technology, but is also becoming an integral part of the transaction business.  Media will drive transactional business, e.g. Pinterest and  hoard of other new business that start with visual inspiration but ultimately drive a purchase or other transaction from a video or image.  This will have a tremendous impact on how apps and websites are designed and built. People want to find what they want quickly visually and then take action with minimal additional steps.

 

One the tech side, unless the "cable" companies radically re-invent themselves, I see  a new category of companies emerging that are media aggregators, delivering content directly from creators to whatever device you are holding or looking at, and more and more that device will be mobile, or at least wirelessly connected to the services. The early stages of this are already emerging today.

 

Cable as we know and hate it will disappear and content will be delivered to us over high bandwidth and high quality wireless. No more calling the the cable company and being forced to buy some ridiculous bundle of services you don't really want, and then spending hours waiting for the cable guy to show and fix your latest problem due to the crappy equipment they use.

 

You choose what you want to watch/do right now using whatever device you want, and do it wirelessly.

 

I can't wait!

 

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The Open Secret Of iBeacon: Apple Could Have 250M Potential Units In The Wild By 2014 | TechCrunch

The Open Secret Of iBeacon: Apple Could Have 250M Potential Units In The Wild By 2014 | TechCrunch | Technology | Scoop.it
Yesterday, Apple began a small press push on its new iBeacon technology, pushed an Apple Store app update to support them and turned the feature on in 254..
Chris Crafford's insight:

Another great example of Apple thinking way ahead of the game and having an almost insurmountable advantage as a result. Their whole OS strategy, to have a common core across all platforms, laid the foundation for the acceptance of their entire ecosystem today. Stuff works everywhere and works the same everywhere (pretty much). iBeacon is another example of the same thinking, planning for the future and sets up a great opportunity for Apple and retailers to change how we shop once more.

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