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Storybird - About

Storybird - About | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
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Story bird is an online community of artists, writers and readers. Artists upload their work and individuals create and share stories they have written using these images as inspiration. Teachers are able to create a class space and can assign tasks to students.

Writing tasks using this tool may be completely open ended, where students choose images that have meaning for them and create a story or directed in some form i.e. students are given a theme or format that must be used. Students can also be given a set of images in Story bird that they then need to tie together in some way. In my view creating links between images or finding inspiration in an image is a valid creative process that requires the writer to make use what they have in ways they may not have considered otherwise.

This activity requires students to construct their own links and meaning from the images and is therefore based in constructivist learning principles. Story bird also allows users to invite collaborators from their class list or from the outside Story bird membership allowing for socially constructed meanings.

Technology modifies the task by providing easy access to a growing assortment of images and online collaboration between students.

The task is redefined when students share their stories with the online community and receive real time feedback on their stories neither of which would be possible without the use of technology to support this type of sharing. Writers are also able to follow the artists of their favourite illustrations while writers can gather following readers who love their stories, creating a social network within this site.

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15 Digital Tools that Support Project-Based Learning - Learning Unlimited

15 Digital Tools that Support Project-Based Learning - Learning Unlimited | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
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DebateGraph

DebateGraph | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
Debate map visualization of: 12,000+ maps and counting! Click on the bubbles to learn more – and log-in to create free public and private maps on any topic.

Via Nik Peachey
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Camelia Mojica Rodríguez's comment, August 11, 2013 9:44 AM
Buen día Gilberto, recibe un saludo desde Tabasco y te comento que cada día es un paso en firme que damos para lograr lo que gentilmente ustedes nos compartieron en México. Muchas gracias.
Dico Krommenhoek's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:31 AM

Dit ziet er goed uit. In verschillende views kan de mindmap worsten gebruikt om sterkte van ingebrachte ideeën weer te geven, of context te bieden.

http://youtu.be/32InMNjO4tQ om enkele mogelijkheden te bekijken

Martha Schade's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:31 AM

What a great way to develop your own maps. Have a look at the video to get an idea of the possibilities! 

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Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line

Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
The SAMR model is a useful tool for helping teachers think about their own tech use as they begin to make small shifts in the design and implementation of technology driven learning experiences t...
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This blog posting by Susan Oxnevad is guided by Puentedura’s Questions and Transitions ( 2012)  and provides a blue print for how transformation might be achieved using readily available tools  i.e. a Wiki.

 

I was particularly interested in this learning activity because I saw it’s potential for allowing students to develop their own deep and rich understanding of words and through doing so also deepen their understanding of the topic or theme being studied.  

 

I imagined this activity would follow on from, or complement, explicit vocabulary instruction sequences such as those outlined by Marzano ( 2004  ) and Beck et al ( 2002  ) as well as specific content lessons that would be grounded in cognitivist learning theories.

 

 In the activity outlined by Susan Oxenvad, students are supported to use images to explore the subtle nuances of a word and link it in meaningful ways to a topic they are currently studying. This is an open ended task that supports students to construct their own interpretation of the word and their own individual links between the word and the topic. Posting their work to a wiki where peers comment on each other’s work and benefit from the insights of their peers simultaneously moves the activity “up the ladder” to  modification and into the sphere of social constructivism.

 

(I believe she has also modified the delivery of the task by providing students with a digital tool kit for understanding the task and providing students with a Digital Differentiation board ( created in thinglink http://www.thinglink.com/) which provides students with choices of search engines and tools to suit their learning style and needs.)

 

At the modification level, there are options in my context for providing students with an online collaborative space to share their work with classmates. The Learning Place offers the most readily available space for students to share and post their work either within in a Virtual Classroom or pages within an EdStudio (with the discussion function enabled).

 

The Learning Place's  Student Channel has opened up possibilities for students to share their work either as a presentation or interactive session via webconferencing  with other students across the state. The construction of this webconference would require students to work collaboratively to construct the best presentation of their ideas, an activity that draws upon social constructivist theories of learning.The task is redefined at students are able to interact via a range of modalities with an wide audience of their peers, in real time. 

 

 

 

 

Susan has based her learning project on a flexible wiki project 25 Australian Moods ( Betcher, 2010) )  which is constructed around the theme of Australia.

 

 

Beck, I. L., McKeown, M. G., & Kucan, L. (2002). Bringing words to life: robust vocabulary instruction. New York: Guilford Press.

 

Betcher, C. (2010, August 26). Redesigning Learning Tasks: Part 3 | Betchablog. Betchablog | education + technology + ideas. Retrieved August 8, 2013, from http://chrisbetcher.com/2010/08/redesigning-learning-tasks-part-3/

 

R.J. Marzano. Building Background Knowledge for Academic Achievement: Research on What Works in Schools. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2004

Puentedura, R. (2012, August 23). Ruben R. Puentedura's Weblog: The SAMR Model: Background and Exemplars. Hippasus. Retrieved July 21, 2013, from http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/archives/000073.html

 

 

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danahawkins's curator insight, August 8, 2013 9:32 PM

Particularly useful for analysing a tool against SAMR: questions for each step of theladder. 

Elena Keating's curator insight, August 12, 2013 9:35 PM

This sounds like just what I need to implement an interactive collaborative and constructivist classroom that allows for differentiation and explicit teaching according to needs.

Justine Crompton's comment, August 17, 2013 1:39 AM
An interesting blog posting. I work in a school which requires me too provide professional development opportunities for other teachers, mostly in the areas of curriculum implementation, resourcing and technology. I would find teaching staff how to strive for more effective technology integration by using the SAMR framework doable because it is simple and easy to understand. Helping teachers identify what they are already implementing at the various levels would aid confidence that they are capable of working at all levels. Guiding teachers within year level cohorts to examine units of works to modify and redefine activities where possible would promote constructivist learning by teachers. The SAMR example presented visually within the blog is something that could be presented to students as well as teachers as part of the learning cycle.
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Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Samrl model

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: Samrl model | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education
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AAA Interesting resources

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WeVideo - Online Video Creation

WeVideo - Online Video Creation | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
WeVideo is the leading online video creation platform, providing editing, collaboration, and sharing capabilities across any device. Learn more today!
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Allows On line collaborative video creation

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Edmondo

Click here to edit the title

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This site allows secure sharing between teachers and students - students and students. I need set up an account but need to researh exaclty how it works and is used. 

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Paper for the Web | Padlet

Paper for the Web | Padlet | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
The simplest way to create. From any device, with anyone.
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Sandy Shannon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:20 PM

This tool allows users to share images uploaded from their computer, web pages and typed text to create a wall. I need to research how it is accessed and shared and consider how it might be used in my context.

Its interesting to find that this tool was almost too intuitive for me! I was frantically looking for a button that would allow me to add content when all I needed to do was double click ! 

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ThingLink - Make Your Images Interactive

ThingLink - Make Your Images Interactive | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
ThingLink lets users add interactive links to any photo and turn them into fun web experiences that drive engagement.
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enables users to share images and link them to anything on the web

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Project Noah

Get Project Noah on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
Sandy Shannon's insight:

Project Noah provides a web based platform for individuals or groups in any location to share their observations of the natural world and collect important data about biodiversity on a global scale. The project also includes a mobile app for iPhone (https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/project-noah/id417339475?mt=8  ) and Android mobile devices which provides a field guide and allows users to organise their missions and upload contributions easily.  Interested individuals may choose to contribute to a variety of missions which may be based around a particular animal or plant, or a location. The overarching goal of the Project is “to help the mobile masses share their encounters with nature, we are building a powerful force for crowdsourcing ecological data collection and an important educational tool for wildlife awareness and preservation.”

In considering the value of this artefact in my context I must first consider its relevance within the required curriculum. The Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2013) positions Science as a way of understanding our world and frames it as a “collaborative and creative human endeavour”.   The aim is to foster student’s a natural curiosity about the world and humans place within it as well as an understanding of scientific methods so they are able to think critically about issues at local , national and global levels. In my view participation in the online collaboration afforded by Project Noah supports these big picture goals for learning in the subject area of Science.

Within the sub-strand of Biological Sciences Years 3 and 4 students classify living and non-living thing according to their observable features and investigate the ways living things depend on each other and the environment to survive.  Many Science units in these years involve students investigating and documenting plants and animals found within the school grounds.  The “ Global Schoolyard BioBlitz” Mission ( within Project Noah) offers students the opportunity to add “ spottings”  from these local investigations to the “ spottings” of a global network of students who are also documenting their own school grounds.  Participants upload an image, location reference ( google maps)  and a description of the organism and where it was found. Students are able to comment on each other’s photographs and information as well as receive feedback and ID suggestions from nature enthusiasts and experts in their field.

I can see that successful learning around this app and website would involve activities influenced by both constructivist and cognitivist learning theories. In order to successfully communicate their “ spottings” students would need to be taught the conventions of communicating scientific observations ( this links with the Australian Curriculum’s Science enquiry skills sub-strand of Communicating ( ACARA, 2013) and this could be done most effectively using cognitivist strategies to explicitly teach the process of communicating observations clearly and build students specialist vocabulary. Behaviourist methods such as flashcards/drill and practise may also be used to consolidate students understanding of vocabulary and basic concepts.

Having considered Communication within the field of Science I can now go on to the view this artefact in light of its value in supporting more general capabilities of life long learners and active citizens as defined by The Melbourne Declaration on the Educational Goals for Young Australians (MCEETYA 2008). The declaration states that “ Confident and creative individuals have a sense of optimism about their lives and the future”. Communicating effectively at a global level with an authentic audience supports student’s engagement with the world as global citizens and fosters a sense of belonging and working as a team working toward positive change.

The collective and collaborative nature of the project also allows for constructivist learning as participants around the globe work together to construct a comprehensive and searchable catalogue of the natural world from their personal observations. There are also experts and nature enthusiasts who lend their expertise in identifying plant and animal “spottings“ posted by others . I found a fantastic example of this on one of the Global Schoolyard BioBlitz postings where a student had posted an image of a larva as Unknown. An expert in lady beetles from another part of the country had then posted a comment identifying the larva as belonging to a particular species of the beetle. There are also detailed discussions and sharing of “ spottings” between participants. The project uses the term “ citizen scientists”  when referring to its contributors which gives equal value to all contributions and highlights that anyone can contribute to this scientific endeavour. This artefact also allows participants to create or join interest groups ( or Missions) and begin to specialise and deepen their knowledge in those areas.

At an Augmentation level the iPhone app ( I installed it on my iPad and it works! ) includes a field guide which allows users to search by location and type of organism. This feature would allow students an immediate reference when documenting or identifying their “ spottings”.

At a Transformative level, redefinition occurs as students add to the knowledge base provided by the collective “spottings” of the global Project Noah community and collaborate with experts and enthusiasts in this field. Such collaboration, discussion and cataloguing would not be possible without technology. The local task of documenting the life forms in our school grounds has been transformed into a collaborative, global activity which contributes in a meaningful way to improve our knowledge of the world around us and our place within it.

 

ACARA. (n.d.). The Australian Curriculum v5.0 . The Australian Curriculum v5.0 . Retrieved August 4, 2013, from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. (2008,). MCEECDYA | Redirect. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceecdya/melbourne_declaration,25979.html

 

 

 

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MODULE: Digital Storytelling

INTRODUCTION Digital storytelling is a way to share one's ideas and develop literacy through creating a multimedia project. The melding of spoken word, dynamic images, and music help the storytelle...
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Usefu information about resources and tools for  digital storytelling.

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wideo - Anyone can make cool videos.

wideo - Anyone can make cool videos. | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
A new tool to make cool videos. You just choose a template, insert objects, animate and share! Go meet Mr. Wideo :)

Via Nik Peachey, Kylie Joyce
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Portia Chandler's curator insight, March 29, 2013 8:24 AM

If you like online videos, take a look at this!

Catalina Elena Oyarzún Albarracín's comment, April 29, 2013 3:23 PM
Just great!!!!!!!!!!
Elena Keating's curator insight, August 12, 2013 8:38 PM

There seem to be several different sources to assist in making presentations interesting. The challenge for digital dinosaurs is being able to use and adapt them.

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Quip - Collaborative word processor for mobile

Quip - Collaborative word processor for mobile | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it

With Quip, you can make your edits right in the shared document, comment on a specific section, and even chat with the other authors directly while you're all making tweaks. Tracked changes show exactly how the draft has evolved.


Via Nik Peachey
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Kiruthika Ragupathi's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:52 PM

Seems like a cool collaborative tool!

Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, August 13, 2013 2:08 AM

Useful for collaborative editing of the text...

Heiko Idensen's curator insight, September 21, 2013 1:22 AM

Quip läuft auf Desktop-Computern (PC und Mac), iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, und Android. Wo immer du auch bist, welches Gerät du auch benutzt - Quip ist dabei und funktioniert.

Gemeinschaftliches Bearbeiten

Mit Quip können alle zur gleichen Zeit an derselben Version des Dokuments arbeiten.

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Flexible Learning Paths

Flexible Learning Paths | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
TOUCH this image
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A collections of tools for supporting differentiation in online environments.

 

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Elena Keating's curator insight, August 12, 2013 9:32 PM

Great shortcut to a variety of learning tools

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Redesigning Learning Tasks: Part 3 - Betchablog

Redesigning Learning Tasks: Part 3 - Betchablog | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
My role at school is all about trying to helping teachers leverage technology to come up with more interesting and engaging ways to help their students learn.  Some of our older students are in laptop programs which gives them fulltime 1:1 access ...
Sandy Shannon's insight:

This task was the original inspiration behind the task discussed by Susan Oxnevad in  “ Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line” (http://gettingsmart.com/2013/07/using-samr-to-teach-above-the-line/ ) .

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danahawkins's comment, August 8, 2013 9:20 PM
This is a great series of learning tasks that would be equally useful for vocabulary development for ESL students. I like how the author actually acknowledges the strengths and weaknesses of the tasks.
Kylie Joyce's comment, August 10, 2013 5:52 PM
The potential for this type of task to be utilised throughout the curriculum is outstanding. And when students are given the opportunity to tackle more advanced projects, they often surprise us!
Elena Keating's curator insight, August 15, 2013 6:06 PM

Now this gives me great ideas

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Project Noah on edshelf

Project Noah on edshelf | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
Information and reviews about Project Noah
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A program that encourages students to photograph and upload photographs or local wild life.A  Global project.

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Animoto - Make & Share Beautiful Videos Online

The easy way to create and share extraordinary videos of your life. Our online video maker turns your photos, video clips and music into video in minutes.
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Enables easy video creation - able to be uploaded to You tube

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Creative Book Builder

Creative Book Builder | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
Creative Book Builder is a fantastic app that allows students to create books in epub format, which can then be exported to iBooks and shared with others. There are a variety of instructional uses...
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ShowMe - The Online Learning Community

ShowMe - The Online Learning Community | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
ShowMe is an open online learning community where anyone can learn and teach any topic. Our iPad app lets you easily create and share video lessons.
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Show me is an iPad app that allows users to create mini tutorials by writing on the screen with their fingers or stylus while recording their voice. It also allows users to insert photographs and images sourced from the web. Teachers and students can create accounts and access and share lessons via the website, email, Facebook and Twitter. Lessons can also be embedded in blogs. It is very similar to another app and learning community, Educreations http://www.educreations.com/

Developing basic literacy and numeracy skills is a vital and necessary goal of education (MCEETYA 2008) and finding ways to engage students in meaningful practice to consolidate this learning is a challenge teachers face every day.

In my view this type of application lends itself most readily to learning activities based on cognitivist principles.  The examples I have found by browsing the site and searching for examples in blogs confirm this perception. Apart from the obvious advantages of allowing students to review teacher created lessons as many times as needed, once students have been taught a particular rule or process they can consolidate their knowledge by acting as a teacher and creating their own mini lesson using ShowMe (or Educreations).  Creating their own lesson requires students to think carefully about how they will present the information clearly, which examples are best and their use of metalanguage. Students are learning by teaching.

The task of explaining their understanding is transformed at the Modification level by the use of technology to record, replay and shares these tutorials with other students within their class. There is a social constructivist element at work at this level as students are able to receive feedback on their lessons from their peers and use this to modify and improve their lesson/ presentation. This task is redefined and given further significance when students are able to participate in and contribute to online communities of learners.

This is where I noticed the greatest difference between Educreations and ShowMe. From my ( very amateur) explorations it appears that ShowMe is a more open community that allows uses to like, follow and comment on other users presentations within the ShowMe community where as Educreations allow users to Like via Facebook and Tweet.

Both allow teachers to create student accounts and monitor student’s interaction within the community. In my context I would need to be very sure about exactly how these systems worked before creating student accounts.

 

 

Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. (2008,). MCEECDYA | Redirect. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://www.mceetya.edu.au/mceecdya/melbourne_declaration,25979.html

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Substitute or redefine? Mobile learning in and out of class

Substitute or redefine? Mobile learning in and out of class | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
Substitute or redefine? Mobile learning in and out of class
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Includes examples of redefinition of learning through the use of mobile devices. Includes an example of using SMS messages to support reluctant readers and mobile device use in math mapping activities. Worth further exploration.

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Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: SAMR - Walking a Wiki Up the ...

Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: SAMR - Walking a Wiki Up the ... | Sandy's Shortlist | Scoop.it
I created a MentorMob playlist designed to share a sample of a wiki project I've walked up and down the SAMR ladder. The playlist displays illustrated examples of the project at each level of SAMR. After you've viewed the ...
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Illustrates the use of wikis in each level of SAMR model

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