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Co-operation vs. Competition (vs. Collaboration)

Co-operation vs. Competition (vs. Collaboration) | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

Will Richardson's book and blogs were essential reading when I first started using social media in teaching. -- Howard

 

"Finnish educator and author Pasi Sahlberg writing in yesterday’s Washington Post:
Many reformers believe that the quality of education improves when schools compete against one another. For cooperation to happen, we need to be participating transparently with the idea that others can build upon what we share, reshare it, curate it, connect it or whatever else. In that vein, it’s why we need to promote a “network literacy” that supports our ability to find, analyze, synthesize and share information and knowledge in safe, effective and ethical ways. In my discussions and snap polling of education audiences, I can tell you we’re nowhere near a tipping point with that in schools."


Via Ann S. Michaelsen, Howard Rheingold, WorklowTrainer, Giuliano Tavaroli
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Co-operation vs. Competition (vs. Collaboration)

Co-operation vs. Competition (vs. Collaboration) | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

Will Richardson's book and blogs were essential reading when I first started using social media in teaching. -- Howard

 

"Finnish educator and author Pasi Sahlberg writing in yesterday’s Washington Post:
Many reformers believe that the quality of education improves when schools compete against one another. For cooperation to happen, we need to be participating transparently with the idea that others can build upon what we share, reshare it, curate it, connect it or whatever else. In that vein, it’s why we need to promote a “network literacy” that supports our ability to find, analyze, synthesize and share information and knowledge in safe, effective and ethical ways. In my discussions and snap polling of education audiences, I can tell you we’re nowhere near a tipping point with that in schools."


Via Ann S. Michaelsen, Howard Rheingold, WorklowTrainer
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Six degrees of mobilisation

Six degrees of mobilisation | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it
IN 1967 Stanley Milgram, an American social scientist, conducted an experiment in which he sent dozens of packages to random people in Omaha, Nebraska. He asked them...

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TED Blog | New TED Book: Mind Amplifier

TED Blog | New TED Book: Mind Amplifier | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

Augmentation always requires the individual human brain, the technological extension and the methods, language, and training that support use of the technology, and social communication among populations of individuals. In this extended e-book, I try to situate augmentation in the historical progression of human biological and cultural evolution and project a vision of where it might go in the future. -- Howard

 

"Mind Amplifier: Can Our Digital Tools Make Us Smarter? examines the origins of digital mind-extending tools, and lays out the foundations for their future. In it, Rheingold proposes an applied, interdisciplinary science of mind amplification. He also unveils a new protocol for developing techno-cognitive-social technologies that embrace empathy, mindfulness, and compassion — elements lacking from existing digital mind-tools."


Via Howard Rheingold, WorklowTrainer
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Socius Ars's curator insight, April 15, 2013 6:26 AM

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History Of Life On Earth Shown As A 24 Hour Clock

History Of Life On Earth Shown As A 24 Hour Clock | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

For decades the origin and evolution of life was restricted to the fossil record that recorded hard-shelled life. We now know, through determination of absolute ages by radioactive decay, that this record only record the last 500 m.y. or so of life. Prior to that, life existed as soft-bodied organisms, or even earlier, as single cell bacteria (prokaryotes) or single-celled organisms with nuclei (eukaryotes). The oldest microfossils, composed of single-celled organisms that probably were similar to cyanobacteria, are 3.5 b.y. old, and are found in Western Australia (not the same locality where the very old zircon mineral grains were found). More convincing evidence for life in the Archean comes from fossil layered microbial communities called stromatolites. Although the 3.5 b.y. old microfossils are still debated, people pretty much agree that the fossil record for life is undisputable by about 3.0 b.y., and stromatolites are part of this evidence. Fossil bacteria are universally accepted for the Proterozoic, where the images (and chemical compositions) are much more clear than the fuzzy images for the 3.5 b.y. old microfossils.

 

The Proterozoic microfossils are much more similar to the modern cyanobacteria. The occurrence of cyanobacteria early in earth's history is critical, since their metabolic "waste product" is oxygen, and it was essential to produce high levels of oxygen in the earth's atmosphere before more complex life (which requires different means of metabolism and energy storage) could evolve. In the latest part of the Proterozoic (~ 600 m.y. ago), multi-cellular, complex life is recorded in the fossil record.

 

The figure shown above casts the origin and evolution of life into a 24 hour clock.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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How to Consistently Out-Curate Your Competitors | Outspoken Media

How to Consistently Out-Curate Your Competitors | Outspoken Media | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

Excerpted from this interesting article on Outspoken Media:

"The facts are:

***Content curation is a needed skill that will only grow in importance as more big brands and publishers flood the Internet with all kinds of content.
***Curation can be a fun, rewarding and highly effective part of your online marketing mix.
***Curating content requires skill, tenacity and, above all, an unflinching focus on the needs of your audience.

 

The biggest temptation all search marketers face is to sell our souls to the Borg and AUTOMATE EVERYTHING.

 

An effective curation strategy requires a healthy variety of sources. If you expect any one tool to do all of the work for you, you’re going to miss a lot of remarkable content.

 

So, use a fancy tool as one of your filters, if you wish. But don’t fool yourself into believing you can just put it on autopilot and watch it magically send you everything you need to succeed.

 

If your goal is to curate content that provides true value for your audience, you’ve got to out-hustle all of the namby-pamby posers in your niche who claim to be curating, however half-heartedly.

 

Here is a collection of solid strategies and tasty tactics that will help you consistently out-curate your competitors.

1) Create Twitter lists of experts and thought leaders in your niche.

2) Save Twitter searches for relevant keywords.
3) Build customized MyAllTop pages to keep up on industry blogs.
4) Set up Google Alerts for targeted keywords.
5) Subscribe to blogs by RSS and view them in Google Reader.
6) Create topical lists on Facebook.
7) Perform keyword searches in Trackur.
8) Explore Regator’s curated blog directory.
9) Hunt down content by category on StumbleUpon.
10) Find applicable articles and experts with Topsy.
11) Join relevant LinkedIn groups.
12) Search Scribd’s documents database.
13) Dig into the bookmarked items on Delicious.
14) Keep an eye on curated niche sites that serve your audience, like Inbound.org.
15) Scour the Web with Snip.it and Scoop.it.
16) Drop your keywords into Bottlenose.
17) Scan the curated lists on List.ly.
18) Sign up for a personalized email digest from YourVersion.
19) Say hello to your little friend: Social Buzz.
20) Swing by Ice Rocket and ROCKZi once in awhile.
21) Ignore Google+ at your own risk. I dare you. #smooches.

 

Constantly Refine and Refocus Your Curation Strategy:

I like to cram tons of different sources into my content funnel at the beginning of each new curation project. Then, once I’m convinced I’ve cast my net wide enough, I begin the crucial process of whittling down those sources into a much more manageable list.

 

Be the Pickiest, Little Curator Allowed by Law:

If you’re going to out-curate your competition, every piece of content you serve to your audience has to be exactly the right piece of content.

Set high standards and strive to exceed them...."

 

 

Read full, long and interesting article here: 

http://outspokenmedia.com/online-marketing/how-to-consistently-out-curate-your-competitors/


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Gerrit Bes
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Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, October 2, 2012 7:08 AM
Great note Giuseppe. I moved it to Curation Revolution this morning. Marty
Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, October 2, 2012 7:22 AM
@Marty...I have seen your rescoop few minutes ago. Thanks for appreciation my curated article.
massimo facchinetti's comment, October 5, 2012 7:48 PM
I am far from being namby-pamby
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Cyber Security Acts Failure Leaves Infrastructure Vulnerable ...

“Dan Lohrmann has been in the information security business for the bulk of the past decade, and hes scratching his head over the continued inability of Congress to enact nationwide cybersecurity protections.

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Privacy and security in the era of mobile applications and multiple stores

The mobile application craze has seen the creation of usefully and not so useful utilities that millions of consumers around the world download on a daily basis.
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Staggering Social Media Statistics from the Olympics - Infographic ...

Staggering Social Media Statistics from the Olympics - Infographic ... | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it
When I signed up to social media over four years ago you could almost count the number of tweets with a pen and a piece of paper. Facebook had not even cracked 50 million users. Now it is approaching one billion users ...
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Future Perfect

Future Perfect | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it
#slowearjournal Rescuing fogotten sci-fi masterpieces and bringing them into the present. Singularity & Co.
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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."


Via Seth Dixon
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Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

Tim Stark's curator insight, October 24, 2015 9:54 PM

Great visual for economics and sociology courses

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Mass of ants behaving like an "intelligent" fluid

Fire ants use their claws to grip diverse surfaces, including each other. As a result of their mutual adhesion and large numbers, ant colonies flow like inanimate fluids. This film shows how ants behave similarly to the spreading of drops, the capillary rise of menisci, and gravity-driven flow down a wall. By emulating the flow of fluids, ant colonies can remain united under stressful conditions.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Incident: Air France A319 at Sofia on Oct 16th 2012, rejected takeoff from taxiway

Incident: Air France A319 at Sofia on Oct 16th 2012, rejected takeoff from taxiway | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

An Air France Airbus A319-100, registration F-GRHU performing flight AF-1587 from Sofia (Bulgaria) to Paris Charles de Gaulle (France), was taxiing for departure from runway 09, when the aircraft was cleared for takeoff from runway 09 at 06:56L (03:56Z). The aircraft however turned onto taxiway H and began takeoff from the taxiway about a minute later, when tower, quite agitated, instructed "Air France 1587, stop immediately! Stop immediately, Air France 1587! This is taxiway Hotel!" The crew rejected takeoff at low speed (recorded ground speed about 20 knots) and turned right onto taxiway C about 700 meters/2300 feet down taxiway H and returned to the holding point runway 09 taking off the runway about 20 minutes after the reject attempt to depart the taxiway. The aircraft reached Paris safely with a delay of about 10 minutes.


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The Network Blog « The Infotention Network

The Network Blog « The Infotention Network | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

This blog is worth reading.


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TED Blog | New TED Book: Mind Amplifier

TED Blog | New TED Book: Mind Amplifier | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

Augmentation always requires the individual human brain, the technological extension and the methods, language, and training that support use of the technology, and social communication among populations of individuals. In this extended e-book, I try to situate augmentation in the historical progression of human biological and cultural evolution and project a vision of where it might go in the future. -- Howard

 

"Mind Amplifier: Can Our Digital Tools Make Us Smarter? examines the origins of digital mind-extending tools, and lays out the foundations for their future. In it, Rheingold proposes an applied, interdisciplinary science of mind amplification. He also unveils a new protocol for developing techno-cognitive-social technologies that embrace empathy, mindfulness, and compassion — elements lacking from existing digital mind-tools."


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Socius Ars's curator insight, April 15, 2013 6:26 AM

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History of the Internet

"History of the Internet" is an animated documentary explaining the inventions from time-sharing to filesharing, from Arpanet to Internet.

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How artificial intelligence is changing our lives

How artificial intelligence is changing our lives | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

In a sense, AI has become almost mundanely ubiquitous, from the intelligent sensors that set the aperture and shutter speed in digital cameras, to the heat and humidity probes in dryers, to the automatic parking feature in cars. And more applications are tumbling out of labs and laptops by the hour.


“It’s an exciting world,” says Colin Angle, chairman and cofounder of iRobot, which has brought a number of smart products, including the Roomba vacuum cleaner, to consumers in the past decade.


What may be most surprising about AI today, in fact, is how little amazement it creates. Perhaps science-fiction stories with humanlike androids, from the charming Data (“Star Trek“) to the obsequious C-3PO (“Star Wars”) to the sinister Terminator, have raised unrealistic expectations. Or maybe human nature just doesn’t stay amazed for long.


“Today’s mind-popping, eye-popping technology in 18 months will be as blasé and old as a 1980 pair of double-knit trousers,” says Paul Saffo, a futurist and managing director of foresight at Discern Analytics in San Francisco. “Our expectations are a moving target.”

 

The ability to create machine intelligence that mimics human thinking would be a tremendous scientific accomplishment, enabling humans to understand their own thought processes better. But even experts in the field won’t promise when, or even if, this will happen.

 

Entrepreneurs like iRobot’s Mr. Angle aren’t fussing over whether today’s clever gadgets represent “true” AI, or worrying about when, or if, their robots will ever be self-aware. Starting with Roomba, which marks its 10th birthday this month, his company has produced a stream of practical robots that do “dull, dirty, or dangerous” jobs in the home or on the battlefield. These range from smart machines that clean floors and gutters to the thousands of PackBots and other robot models used by the US military for reconnaissance and bomb disposal.


While robots in particular seem to fascinate humans, especially if they are designed to look like us, they represent only one visible form of AI. Two other developments are poised to fundamentally change the way we use the technology: voice recognition and self-driving cars.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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oliviersc's comment, October 3, 2012 11:19 AM
Un petit tour par mes Cercles privés à Google+ Thanks for this article !
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History of the Internet

"History of the Internet" is an animated documentary explaining the inventions from time-sharing to filesharing, from Arpanet to Internet.

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How #Recruiters Use #SocialMedia to Screen #Candidates [INFOGRAPHIC] - Social-Hire

How #Recruiters Use #SocialMedia to Screen #Candidates [INFOGRAPHIC] - Social-Hire | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it
RT @tonyrestell: Job Screening with Social Networks - what are employers up to?
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Scientists Discover Previously Unknown Cleansing System in Brain

Scientists Discover Previously Unknown Cleansing System in Brain | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it

A previously unrecognized system that drains waste from the brain at a rapid clip has been discovered by neuroscientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The highly organized system acts like a series of pipes that piggyback on the brain’s blood vessels, sort of a shadow plumbing system that seems to serve much the same function in the brain as the lymph system does in the rest of the body – to drain away waste products.

 

Scientists have known that cerebrospinal fluid or CSF plays an important role cleansing brain tissue, carrying away waste products and carrying nutrients to brain tissue through a process known as diffusion. The newly discovered system circulates CSF to every corner of the brain much more efficiently, through what scientists call bulk flow or convection.

 

While the previously discovered system works more like a trickle, percolating CSF through brain tissue, the new system is under pressure, pushing large volumes of CSF through the brain each day to carry waste away more forcefully.

 

The glymphatic system is like a layer of piping that surrounds the brain’s existing blood vessels. The team found that glial cells called astrocytes use projections known as “end feet” to form a network of conduits around the outsides of arteries and veins inside the brain – similar to the way a canopy of tree branches along a well-wooded street might create a sort of channel above the roadway.

 

Those end feet are filled with structures known as water channels or aquaporins, which move CSF through the brain. The team found that CSF is pumped into the brain along the channels that surround arteries, then washes through brain tissue before collecting in channels around veins and draining from the brain.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dov Henis's comment, August 23, 2012 11:32 AM
Brain's Cleansing System

Tags: brain clean-up, brain evolution, melatonin function, neural cells evolution

A.
Another Wheel Reinvention
Brain's hidden sewers revealed
Specialized cells host a hitherto unknown cleansing system.
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/343079/title/Brains_hidden_sewers_revealed

B.
http://www.articlesbase.com/science-articles/life-is-simpler-than-they-tell-us-817144.html
Now we can appreciate the fractal nature of life's evolution. It is ever-continuous ever-enhanced ever-complexed cooperation. Now we can understand why, and grosso modo how, all the organs and processes and signals found in multicelled organisms have their origins in the monocells communities, cultures. And this includes the functions of serotonin and melatonin and, yes, the evolution of neural cells and the neural systems with their intricate outer-membrane shapes and functionings and with their high energy consumption requirements.

C.
http://www.immunityageing.com/content/2/1/17/comments
Melatonin Origin And Function
Dov Henis (2009-02-03)
Melatonin's role was to signal that the genes are asleep, their functional activities are shut off, and it is time for the security and maintenance crews to do their tasks, especially to clean up the intercell environment, for keeping the community of cells in proper state.

Dov Henis (comments from 22nd century)
http://universe-life.com/
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The Rise Of The New App Economy

The Rise Of The New App Economy | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it


VisionMobile recently designed an Infographic, The Rise of the new App Economy – based on and highlighting some of the key findings and insights from the Developer Economics 2012 Research Report.


This Research is based on an online survey of 1,500+ developers from across the globe, as well as 20 qualitative interviews. Our sample was global, including developers not just from North America, Europe and Asia, but also from Africa, Oceania and Latin America.


Here are some of the many insights from the report:

# The average per-app revenue is in the range of $1,200-$3,900 per month, depending on platform
# Irrespective of which platform they primarily use, the majority of developers (57%) plan to adopt Windows Phone
#Tablets are now a mainstream screen for developers: more than 50% of developers are now targeting tablets, with iOS developers most likely (74%) to do so
# North America tops app demand with 41% of developers indicating this is a top-3 download region, irrespective of their region of origin


Among other insights, this Infographic presents the most popular mobile platforms for developers (and how they’ve gained or lost Mindshare in the past year).

Android and iOS continue to be the most popular platforms, with a Mindshare Index of 76% and 66% respectively, while mobile web takes third place. You’ll also find the most popular screens that developers are currently targeting. Some 85% of developers today are targeting smartphones and 51% are targeting tablets – but, despite the hype, just around 8% of them target the TV screen.


Also presented are some sad truths about developer monetization – and how 1 in 3 developers are living below the “app poverty line”, uncovers which are the most cost-heavy platforms to develop on and takes a look at the supply vs. demand of apps at a regional level.


By Matos Kapetanakis. http://bit.ly/TDNqCr ;

Developer Economics 2012 Research Report. [PDF] http://bit.ly/PbTZvI ;

Source. http://bit.ly/OXxBTX ;

 



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Kindle And Me...: Cover Reveal : Wicked Sense (Singularity, #1) by Fabio Bueno

Kindle And Me...: Cover Reveal : Wicked Sense (Singularity, #1) by Fabio Bueno | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it
Cover Reveal : Wicked Sense (Singularity, #1) by Fabio Bueno http://t.co/g1CCFJvG #coverreveal...
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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


Via Seth Dixon
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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The iPhone Has Passed a Key Security Threshold - Technology Review

The iPhone Has Passed a Key Security Threshold - Technology Review | Technology and Risks | Scoop.it
Does society really want extremely private mobile devices if they make life easier for criminals? Apple's newly toughened standards sharpen the focus on that question.
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