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Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic

Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it

It’s amazing how quickly technology changes, even in the course of six months. But can you imagine how much it has changed over decades? The Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic shows how educational technology has evolved in schools over the past 114 years. 1900 – 19... http://elearninginfographics.com/timeline-of-educational-technology-in-schools-infographic/


Via elearninginfographic
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

An intriguing little infographic documenting the history of technology and its application to the education system.  Interesting how the use of radio or white boards (as opposed to chalk boards) are considered technological "improvements" or were seemingly revolutionary at the time.  Someone somewhere was a pioneer for bringing the radio or a cassette tape into the classroom.  I thought the wireless numbers for American schools was high and the use of iPads low.  Perhaps iPads are like Smart Boards, in that they seem really cool, but can be challenging to use effectively on a daily basis.  My interest is in cloud computing, web-based application, BYOD, and how to improve LMS.  What I'm always wondering is, what's coming next and how will it alter the use of technology in the classroom?

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BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 1, 2014 4:11 PM

We love a good infographic! It is neat to see how technology has evolved in schools. 

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New Minnesota school blends online learning with in-class teachers - Rick Kupchella's BringMeTheNews

New Minnesota school blends online learning with in-class teachers - Rick Kupchella's BringMeTheNews | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
New Minnesota school blends online learning with in-class teachers Rick Kupchella's BringMeTheNews “Learning is really a social experience and we want to take what that online learning opportunity has, but really reinforce it and support it with...
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

A different type of blended learning than what I am used to.  The aptly named Flex school, apparently using the highly popular K12 delivery of online curriculum combines learning in a school environment with learning online (as opposed to the school where I am, where we have classes that combine technology in the classroom and traditional teaching methods).  With a 97% college acceptance rate, the Flex program claims to have a high degree of success.  I would be interested to see whether the in-school teaching emphasized or downplayed the use of technology in real time, citing it as a distraction for some.

 

Students having their own work spaces, having individually designed learning plans, and having flexible schedules  is perfect for students who athletes, students who have jobs, and students who have had challenges managing their time and being successful in a standard secondary school.

 

Possibly the future (or one future) of education.

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The No.1 App for Every Teacher....

The No.1 App for Every Teacher.... | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Not all apps are created equal. The first version of Explain Everything was good. The second version is outstanding. As an educator my life revolves around learning, organisation, workflow and scho...
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

Just started using screen casting, with some great free and purchase options from TechSmith (and others) such as Camtasia, Jing, Screencasting, and Snagit.

 

Have heard of this app, Explain Everything, and have downloaded it to my iPad, but have not played with it yet.  There are a number of apps that are ideal for quick tutorials and Explain Everything is apparently one of the best.  

 

With several options in how you want to share your short videos, and great suggestions regarding an unlisted YouTube channel, Explain Everything (as suggested in the "scooped" post) is a great way to give both descriptive feedback and implement key aspects of a "flipped" classroom.

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The Pedagogies of Reading and Not Reading

The Pedagogies of Reading and Not Reading | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
“There is more than one way not to read, the most radical of which is not to open a book at all.” ~ Pierre Bayard, How to Talk About Books You Haven’t Read Not reading is serious scholarly business...
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

Not so much 21st century, but quite relevant to me, as a secondary school English teacher.  An interesting perspective or attitude or position to take, in that we are all non-readers to some extent.  Some of us aspire to read a lot; some of us avoid reading, and avoid completing those books we do start.  No one can read anything; in fact, the most any of us can read is a very small sampling of texts.  We may be able to become experts in a few very specific areas, but no one can be comprehensively knowledgeable about every type of text or topic.  Getting students to be honest about what they read, what they don't read, and why they don't (or why they stop) is a great place to start.  

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Getting personal: Technology in the classroom, success in the world - News & Observer

Getting personal: Technology in the classroom, success in the world - News & Observer | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Getting personal: Technology in the classroom, success in the world
News & Observer
More than ever, technology is turning students from passive observers into active learners in our classrooms.
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

That is the hope, that students are no longer sitting and listening, but contributing, constructing, and exploring.  As we have moved along in our implementation of blended learning in a BYOD school, the limitations of our LMS became evident; while Moodle is a great tool, and a good first step in creating an online platform for your school, it does not allow for much co-construction, collaboration, or communication between students (besides the use of the forum feature for different types of online dialogue, and the wiki/glossary).

 

This article focuses on the infrastructure, something not always as glamorous or dramatic as the successes and failures that occur in the classroom.  Wireless internet connectivity and dependability is key to the foundation of our entire program, and something that can be incredibly frustrating, as the one time it went down this semester was  when we had another school's English dept. visiting us to see our BYOD/blended learning program in action.  

 

When you have an entire class, or an entire grade, or an entire school using Moodle, partially to prepare for the OSSLT (I think we survived) or an entire class in the same Google Doc, the wireless internet is going to determine whether your group feels the positive momentum as they are all moving forward together, or the frustration as they wait many minutes for a single image to load.

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Classroom of the Future: The New Way to Teach Kids

March 31 (Bloomberg) --- It's called Blended Learning, combining teaching and technology in an effort to improve learning outcomes. It's one of the ways scho...
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

An interesting interpretation on the concept of blended learning.  In an overall sense, to me, it means a blending of teaching strategies involving technology and traditional teaching methods.  In the video, one teacher has used blended learning to create three stations, with three groups of 12 students, turning a 36 student classroom into something more manageable.  The devices, approaching $1000, seem expensive, with additional programs needing to be added to the machines.  The structure looks effective; hopefully it does not give someone the bright idea that technology can allow for bigger class sizes.

 

The principal seems to suggest that technology can be used for managing teachers and students, and there is a fine line between managing a class and not trusting students and teachers, so technology has to be used with care, to work with all stakeholders, so that everyone feels connected and assisted, as opposed to technology being used for surveillance.

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Sugata Mitra's new experiments in self-teaching - YouTube

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Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

One of my favourite TED talks, and not because it suggests that students learn whether there is a teacher present or not.  Upon reflection, the insight is perfectly obvious, but the observations and results from Sugata Mitra's "hole in the wall" experiment had children self-organizing, teaching themselves a language in order to overcome the obstacle of surfing the web in English, collaborating, and collectively learning online content.  

 

Sometimes adults simply need to get out of the way, or even better, provide the optimal conditions that enable students to explore and experiment, and then get out of the way.  (Apparently, this experiment also served as inspiration for the novel, Q & A, and the film adaptation, Slumdog Millionaire.)

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A Look At Education Technology And Social Media - Edudemic - Linkis.com

A Look At Education Technology And Social Media - Edudemic - Linkis.com | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
This afternoon I had a class of 16 and 17 year old young men in a traditional library space. It was the very last period, of the last Friday of formal classes for the year.
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

Simple and powerful.

 

This post described an activity that was very simple to create and had amazing results.  It combined differentiation of topics, technology and people's natural desire to socialize (most people's) into a powerful blend where the teacher disappeared and students engaged in rigorous interaction with the content/curriculum.  Engagement became a non-issue. 

 

The writer/teacher refers to Sir Ken Robinson and the criticism of the industrial model, but the real success here was creating and providing the criteria needed to allow collaboration to happen.  The students generated the content, the students worked through the content, and the students enjoyed learning the content. 

 

Intriguing that multiple students chose to congregate around specific devices, instead of staying fixed and working with their individual device.  Having an individual device is great and powerful, but it actually hinders natural communication between students, and turns a class into individual silos.  Probably without thinking about it consciously, the students moved to those they were comfortable working with, and learned as a group, collaborating as they went.

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The Minecrafted Classroom: MinecraftEdu Bootcamp

The Minecrafted Classroom: MinecraftEdu Bootcamp | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
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Here's a teacher beginning the Minecraft journey in an elementary classroom, and even though they are at initial stages of setting up the world, figuring out how to move around, and levelling the playing field, already some great things are happening.  Group collaboration, teacher as student, multiple solutions for the same problem, natural communication and leadership opportunities: Minecraft sounds amazing.  I am interested to know how much set-up is needed on the part of the teacher.  This sounds like a great blog to learn about introducing Minecraft into a classroom.  I wonder what the differences would be in secondary school versus elementary school, and specifically in the subject of high school English.

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Learning how Chromebooks work in classrooms - Victorville Daily Press

Learning how Chromebooks work in classrooms - Victorville Daily Press | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Learning how Chromebooks work in classrooms Victorville Daily Press VICTORVILLE • School administrators from across Southern California gathered at the Victor Elementary School District's main office to attend a superintendent symposium hosted by...
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

With BYOD models there seem to be two opposing views regarding student devices.  In one version students bring whatever devices they have access to and teachers must design and deliver curriculum that can be accessed and interacted with using any device.  Using web-based technology, such as Google Apps, Moodle, etc. means that students don't need to have specific programs, some of which are expensive, on their devices.

 

The other way to go is to level the playing field, not through the web-based programs and applications students use, but by controlling what device students have access to.  In this case it is Chromebooks, devices made by companies such as Samsung and Acer that use Google's Chrome operating system.  Designed primarily to be used online, with some functionality offline, having students use only one device makes life a lot easier for teachers, as you know exactly what the device can and can't do.

 

Without worrying about Google's "insidious" plan to take over the technological universe, the plan to use Chromebooks either forces school boards to provide everyone with the device of choice, or forces students' parents to all purchase the same device.  Having devices in the classroom opens up numerous possibilities and provides not a few challenges for educational institutions to ponder and overcome.  Chromebooks offers one answer to the challenge of blended learning.

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Why BYOD Makes Sense: Thinking Beyond a Standardized 1:1

Why BYOD Makes Sense: Thinking Beyond a Standardized 1:1 | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
I was recently asked, "Why are you giving the teachers choice of a laptop? Why not just go all in with one device?" My answer, simply stated, is that homogenization of any tool is never a good idea i

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

An interesting and relevant article to our school, about BYOD.  In this case it sounds like the latest venture, relevant to the writer of the article, is allowing students to bring devices into the classroom; we are in a position where the expectation is that students will bring a device (at least one) into the classroom, and teachers are expected to use technology in curriculum delivery.

 

One of the central arguments of this piece is the idea of variety leading to creativity, to allow choice, and to not mandate the exact device.  While I agree with this idea I do believe that certain tools are suitable for certain purposes.  For productivity in terms of text creation, a laptop, followed by a netbook, may be the best tool.  For simple tasks such as quick surveys, reading, filming, etc. an iPad, an iPod, or other type of tablet, or small device, may be the best bet.

 

Allowing devices in the classroom is a great first step.  Having teachers design classes/courses/lessons around technology is another necessary step.  Moving from technological use to meaningful and authentic use of technology should come eventually.  Giving students a choice in what to bring and what products they can make to demonstrate their learning will allow them to show what they know in terms of content and technology, and the teacher (and the student's peers) can only benefit from this sharing.

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Professors need to teach more - The Globe and Mail

Professors need to teach more - The Globe and Mail | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Professors need to teach more
The Globe and Mail
What do university professors do?
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

The article focuses on the two sides of being a professor: teaching and research.  In some articles it is mentioned as a 40%-60% ratio, and in others it is referred to as approximately 50% each.  The article mentions that some professors do very little research, but do not teach significantly more.  If the professors who did not conduct research took on a greater course load then a lot less professors would be needed in the system.

 

I guess what I am trying to understand is the difference between the public school system and the university and college system.  My understanding is that elementary and secondary school teachers are essentially employed by the government and that university and college educators are employed by individual institutions, so that a post-secondary institution could conduct business differently than other universities and colleges.

 

The idea of research as something that brings in funds and prestige is interesting.  Are they the primary reasons for universities wanting their professors to conduct research, or is there an actual belief that professors will be better teachers after conducting research?  My assumption is that for most professors their research may make them more knowledgeable and current in their areas of interest, but have very little impact on their actual teaching delivery (unless their field of interest is education, or their research is conducted in a classroom, focusing them to be reflective practitioners).

 

Some of the appeal of being a university professor include the encouragement to inquire deeply in your fields of interest; having several classes offers an opportunity to share that learning with others.  

 

*As a side note, I visit university bookstores such as York University, and the University of Western Ontario on an annual basis (looking for obscure and interesting texts not available at other book stores), and I do find it interesting that some courses remain almost exactly the same (in the UWO English department) decades after I completed my undergrad.  

 

 

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The MOOC Moment and Its Impact on K-12 Education - EdTech ...

The MOOC Moment and Its Impact on K-12 Education - EdTech ... | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
New technologies have a funny effect on them, they can spark periods of disequilibrium, where communities re-evaluate their practices and the future of teaching and learning. Technology ...
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

The MOOC movement is something I am curious about.  As a teacher and a student of online education, it is easy to see the benefits and the drawbacks of remote education, online in real-time or asynchronously.  I have used Desire 2 Learn, Moodle, Nings, Blogs, and Wikis, and I am curious what MOOCs offer, if anything, beyond those platforms.  The mastery model, where students move at their own pace, is alluring.  The flipped classroom, or the Khan Academy model of tutorials, is also intriguing, but what can MOOCs offer?  This article talks about the structure of the public school system, and the stereotypically lecture-oriented post-secondary institutions.  You would think  both groups would have a lot to learn from each other.  How can you be a university professor without being trained to teach?  How can you grade a paper without explicitly sharing the criteria you are going to evaluate ahead of time?  Can the structures and scaffolding in public school systems translate to success in universities and colleges?  

 

What was most interesting about the blog post was the idea that the introduction of technology provides affordances to rethink teaching practices in schools.  In considering how to use technology, teachers, and students, and parents, and administrators are forced to reconsider how teaching and learning happens in their schools.  If for no other reason, that is a great motivator to introduce technology to elicit change. 

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Studying online opens up a new world of opportunity - Telegraph

Studying online opens up a new world of opportunity  - Telegraph | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Distance learning is gaining in respect and popularity as a way to achieve an MBA, wherever you are in the world (Studying online opens up a new world of opportunity via @Telegraph http://t.co/pa5f5mcQrV)...
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

No surprise that studying online is gaining in popularity.  Online education apparently is also gaining in credibility.  The quality of the actual education received from online education is slowly improving as technology improves, teaching improves, and the understanding of what is similar and what is different between traditional and technological teaching deepens.  Affordability should be better with online education, for both the schools and the students.  Creating community online can be difficult, so the social aspect of traditional school remains an advantage.  The convenience of choosing any location to learn (or teach) from is appealing.  It remains to be seen whether as much learning can happen online, at all levels of education; perhaps online learning is more suited to university or college learners, than to high school or (especially) elementary school learners.  It would be interesting to design a school or study, where it was organized only through online communication and guidance.  Imagine a school where there were no teachers...

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Five Teaching Tips for Helping Students Become 'Wild Readers'

Five Teaching Tips for Helping Students Become 'Wild Readers' | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Educator and author Donalyn Miller offers teachers some techniques to create not only avid readers, but lifelong readers.
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

Beyond education, technology, and 21st century teaching (and learning) infecting students with the desire to read, or "wild reading" in the case of this article, is a personal and professional goal, and one that I admit that may be more successful with personally than professionally.

 

Why?

 

My own kids read for 20-40 minutes every day, before they go to bed, in addition to whatever they read at school.  My students in my high school courses are asked to read independently, and then we wonder why some of them attempt to do the assignments without reading, or, in the case of Shakespeare, we do a lot of the reading for them, or in groups, or as a class, releasing them from the responsibility of having to struggle with difficult texts.  

 

My kids have tons of choices, both at their level, beneath their level, and beyond their level.  We do offer choice at my school, but the choices are mine, and they are limited.  

 

My kids like to talk to each other about what they are reading, share their reading with their parents, and read sections to family members.  We have online discussions but rarely engage in the other types of sharing with regards to what we are reading.

 

My kids read at their own pace.  Students in school have to read to the pace of the units and assignments in our courses.

 

If my kids want to read books related to movies, books that are sequels to other books, or even non-books, we let them.  These texts rarely get validated in our school or courses.

 

And that connects to one idea not really dealt with in the article.  Kids today do lots of reading of texts that are not novels, but we don't necessarily give them credit for this reading.  Being a lifelong reader is a great aspiration for all parents, coaches, teachers, etc. (and even kids!) of the children they mentor.  It is a goal we, as adults, can facilitate in a number of different ways.

 

I can't understand why we don't produce more "wild readers".

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School district's investment in technology means changes for students - and ... - The Sheboygan Press

School district's investment in technology means changes for students - and ... - The Sheboygan Press | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it

I School district's investment in technology means changes for students - and ...

Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

I am torn on the discussion to have all students, schools, etc. use one device or to allow any and all devices to be used in a classroom setting where significant chunks of the curriculum are going to be dealt with using technology.  Certainly from a logistical standpoint implementation is easier when everyone has the same device.

 

At our school, where students bring laptops (PCs and Macs), netbooks, and tablets, I cannot remember seeing any Chrome books.  Some teachers and departments have had difficulty finding the right program, that can be freely or cheaply downloaded, or is available online as a free web-based tool.  Departments that come to mind include business, who for years have needed to book a computer lab in a BYOD school, because that way everyone had the same program for accounting and other purposes.

 

LMS platforms such as moodle and Desire to Learn help to eliminate some of these problems as any device can access the LMS.  Google Apps for Education are also great, and can be used for any device, providing you don't use internet explorer as your primary browser.

 

A student asked me today if she could/should bring her iPad to school and use it instead of her laptop.  It is faster to get working and to access the internet, but it lacks the functionality to construct products involving text, images, and videos easily.  We talked about getting a stand, adding a keyboard, and I was thinking to myself that we were turning her iPad into a netbook/laptop.

 

Should schools and school boards implement BYOD and blended learning using one device, or is better to  allow for the use of any device in your programming?

 

It was also interesting to hear, that with the rollout of Chrome books coming for the particular region, that the iPads were being relegated to the younger grades.  Pretty machines with instinctive access to begin using them, my kids (7 and 10) are already gravitating away from their iPads to daddy's computers in his office.  So it goes.

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27 Ways Teachers Can Guide and Facilitate Learning Infographic | e-Learning Infographics

27 Ways Teachers Can Guide and Facilitate Learning Infographic | e-Learning Infographics | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
The 27 Ways Teachers Can Guide and Facilitate Learning Infographic refers to Gagne’s 5th event of instruction and presents ways teachers can guide students a
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

An interesting little infographic on different skills and activities students need, and teachers can use, respectively.  Probably ideal for a newer teacher who feels stuck or lacks experience.

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Janette Hughes's curator insight, April 15, 2014 11:31 AM

Derrick, have you ever tried having your students make Infographics? I'd love to do this with my B.Ed. students -- wonder if there is a good program to use?

 

Derrick Schellenberg's comment, April 15, 2014 7:44 PM
Hi Janette (not sure if you will see this). I think Kris could point you in the right direction regarding infographics. He has put some amazing ones together for some of his past presentations in other courses.
Janette Hughes's comment, April 15, 2014 7:49 PM
Yes, comment came via email ... Who knew? Will check with Kris
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Bring your classroom to life with Augmented Reality

Bring your classroom to life with Augmented Reality | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
If you want to dip your toes into the world of Augmented Reality, Todd Nesloney and Drew Minock have shared a few ways you can start incorporating this new trend into your classroom.
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

Interesting little idea with some creative and powerful possibilities.  The ability to animate and activate images with Augmented Reality, using programs like Aurasma, could amazing possibilities for many secondary subjects like science, math and English (if not all of them) and it would be awesome to create something not only for students, but to have students create these so-called Auras.  

 

Some of the ideas here include a multimedia book cover, art galleries, museums, etc.  Teachers could have mini-videos embedded that act as tutorials within homework.  It could add another dimension to students' digital work that takes something aesthetically attractive, like a poster or slideshow, and makes it more compelling through movement, video, and sound.

 

I can't claim to have tried to create anything using Augmented Reality, but I look forward to playing with the technology, something I have genuinely never heard of before.

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Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic

Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it

It’s amazing how quickly technology changes, even in the course of six months. But can you imagine how much it has changed over decades? The Timeline of Educational Technology in Schools Infographic shows how educational technology has evolved in schools over the past 114 years. 1900 – 19... http://elearninginfographics.com/timeline-of-educational-technology-in-schools-infographic/


Via elearninginfographic
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

An intriguing little infographic documenting the history of technology and its application to the education system.  Interesting how the use of radio or white boards (as opposed to chalk boards) are considered technological "improvements" or were seemingly revolutionary at the time.  Someone somewhere was a pioneer for bringing the radio or a cassette tape into the classroom.  I thought the wireless numbers for American schools was high and the use of iPads low.  Perhaps iPads are like Smart Boards, in that they seem really cool, but can be challenging to use effectively on a daily basis.  My interest is in cloud computing, web-based application, BYOD, and how to improve LMS.  What I'm always wondering is, what's coming next and how will it alter the use of technology in the classroom?

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BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 1, 2014 4:11 PM

We love a good infographic! It is neat to see how technology has evolved in schools. 

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Report: Most Schools Delivering BYOD Programs, Training Teachers in Mobile ... - T.H.E. Journal

Report: Most Schools Delivering BYOD Programs, Training Teachers in Mobile ... - T.H.E. Journal | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
KRBD
Report: Most Schools Delivering BYOD Programs, Training Teachers in Mobile ...
T.H.E.
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

An article/report that I was drawn to because I am currently teaching at a BYOD school, where students may bring any and all devices, and while we get some tablets, the majority bring netbooks and laptops, which allows easier reading, responding to, and constructing of multimedia texts.  Tablets can be fast in getting to where you need to go but do not always provide the depth and physical layout one needs to create something of substance.

 

While some of the schools and school districts described focus on training and the use of apps regarding mobile devices, are focus has been initially on LMS platforms, such as moodle and Desire to Learn, and has moved toward web-based applications, such as Google Apps and even Google Sites.  Web-based applications allow the field to be levelled regarding disparate devices, and many of them are free or offer a level of use that is free.

 

Personally, schools (including ours) who adopt a BYOD model need to have a clear and vibrant online presence, ongoing training, and opportunities both within and without of the school to share all the good things that are happening, to actually a build a community of best practices with an ongoing dialogue allowing sharing and adaptation of how to use technology in the classroom alongside traditional teaching practices, a hybrid we and many others have called blended learning.

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6 Channels Of 21st Century Learning

6 Channels Of 21st Century Learning | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
What is 21st century learning, and how do networks and technology function within it?

 

At TeachThought, we constantly wrestle with two big questions: How do people learn, and how can they do it better in a constantly evolving context?

In pursuit, the theme of “21st century learning” often surfaces, a popular label that, while perhaps cliche, still seems to be necessary as we iterate learning models, fold in digital media resources, and incorporate constantly changing technology to an already chaotic event (i.e., learning).

This has produced our 9 Characteristics of 21st Century Learning, a kind of overview we created in 2009, and our Inside-Out School model that is meant to be a kind of bridge between current school design and what’s possible moving forward.


Via Elizabeth E Charles
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

An interesting graphic on some of the skills or activities relating to 21st Century learning.  Not much depth in the actual article/explanation, but the six different channels provide some food for thought.  It is interesting that there is a real shift to student as participant and contributor in all of the six channels.   Their role is active.  They can help determine the direction.  They can explore some of their own interests and express themselves in different ways.  What I find interesting is that you can see the pendulum moving toward the students, and I am curious as to where we are in the arc (in North America, specifically Ontario).  Eventually the pendulum will shift back, toward rigour, and content, and curriculum, as well as standards. 

 

Are we just beginning the swing toward student-centered education (as examples of standardized testing abound) or are we well on our way to reaching the end of this continuum, and we should gird ourselves for the return swing?  Or, will we find a happy hybrid, a blending of a rigorous curriculum, discovered through inquiry-based learning, constructed using student and teacher collaboration, with students "driving the bus" and teachers acting as guides (and hopefully accelerating past the need to test everyone and everything)?

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Passion-Based Learning Week 5: Can Minecraft Foster a Growth Mindset?

Passion-Based Learning Week 5: Can Minecraft Foster a Growth Mindset? | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Can Minecraft help students develop a growth mindset & essential life skills like effort, persistence, and positive attitude? Principal Matt Renwick thinks so. (Can Minecraft Foster a Growth Mindset?
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

An interesting way to introduce Minecraft into a school.  Running it after school, with teacher and administration supervising, it is like an in-house observation of students playing Minecraft.  No curriculum is being taught.  No lessons are being delivered by the teachers.  An ideal opportunity to see what fascinates students about the "sandbox" game.  Interesting that students determine purpose, students help students, and no help is expected or desired from adults.  

 

Trying to harness its design to deliver opportunities to learn about curriculum-related knowledge and skills is the challenge.

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The Problem with SAMR | the spicy learning blog ~ education ...

The Problem with SAMR | the spicy learning blog ~ education ... | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
SAMR has been an incredibly useful framework for conversations around, and implementation of, educational technology in schools and districts. I mean, goodness, just look at a Google image search on ...
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

SAMR is an interesting term that I have never hear of.  Teaching at a BYOD school, I feel like I have missed a meeting (or perhaps more than one) as this would have actually been helpful for the school, especially administration and teachers.  We have definitely felt some evolution (now in our fourth year) if you think of it as somewhat of a continuum, from substitution, augmentation, modification, and redefinition.  Certainly different teachers are moving at different rates and have explored more of these possibilities.

 

I understand the author, Royan's, criticisms of SAMR, in terms of viewing it as a hierarchy, the continuous barrage of edspeak, etc.  This should not dominate, but it is something to consider.  My understanding is that Royan (an elementary teacher at YRDSB, if I am not mistaken) is very far down the path in terms of technology use in the classroom, and it is interesting in his blog post to hear that technology now plays a subtle, less visible role in his classroom, and I believe part of that is because he has moved to being so adept at using technology that a nice balance has been found in blending learning between traditional methods and technological methods to a happy hybrid.

 

SAMR may not be the ONE theory needed to explain how technology should be integrated in the classroom, but it is a helpful tool for those who are beginning, or have begun, that journey.

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Teaching Resilience, Courage, and Perseverance - Huffington Post

Teaching Resilience, Courage, and Perseverance - Huffington Post | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Teaching Resilience, Courage, and Perseverance
Huffington Post
Three years ago this weekend I was diagnosed with my second cancer, a soft-tissue sarcoma. I remember with haunting clarity the early days and months of my diagnosis.
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

Not what I would consider 21st learning.  Not what I would consider teaching with technology.  Relevant nonetheless.

 

For some there has been a pendulum swing as students are sometimes given too much instruction and scaffolding on assignments, as parents take advocating for their kids too far, and as some parties go on the offensive with teachers as a way of contesting and competing for marks.  

 

The pendulum swing I am referring to is putting the onus back on students to persevere, to overcome challenges, to have the strength to survive and learn for setbacks, and to take control of one's own success.

 

Being aware of right and wrong is important.  Standing up for what you believe in is important.  Turning the education system into an adversarial experience benefits no one.  Ultimately, students must be prepared once they leave the school system, and that involves not only knowledge and skills, but also character traits such as the resilience, courage and perseverance mentioned here.  Knowledge and skills are not enough without personal strength.

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Technology and Teaching: Finding a Balance | Edutopia - Linkis.com

Technology and Teaching: Finding a Balance | Edutopia - Linkis.com | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Andrew Marcinek provides a thoughtful course correction for teachers facing full-on technology integration, offering three suggestions for focusing on media and balancing it with what students should be learning.
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

A clear, practical post on the use of technology in the classroom.  A couple of key caveats to technology use include NOT mandating the use of specific technology, and administration having a clear vision of how they would like to proceed with the embedding of technology.

 

Some of the ideas mentioned include the use of a simple LMS.  The one mentioned here is Edmodo.  I am happy with our use of Moodle.

 

The post mentions Google Sites as an online portfolio option.  I totally agree and am trying to explore its use for group work and individual sharing.  Separating the difference between how to use the Moodle and the Google Site is important, as you do want to avoid doubling up on content and confusing your students with multiple locations.

 

Google Drive is an amazing technological tool with a variety of Google Apps (docs, presentations, forms, spreadsheets, and drawings), potentially removing the need for memory sticks and paper in the classroom.  Google Drive also allows you to upload different types of files, including videos, making it easy to share and collaborate with others.

 

One thing I am considering using, in addition to what has been already mentioned, is Blogger.  Moodle, as our LMS, offers some blogging and forum options, but Blogger would be more ideal to create an organic, ongoing online discussion among students.

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4 Keys To Designing A Project-Based Learning Classroom -

4 Keys To Designing A Project-Based Learning Classroom - | Technology and Education in the 21st Century | Scoop.it
What are the keys designing a project-based learning classroom? It starts with the teacher.
Derrick Schellenberg's insight:

Interesting parallels between project-based learning and inquiry-based learning, my preference as a mode of teaching and designing course units and assignments.  Some of the ideas that connect well to my interests in inquiry-based learning include the teacher as a resource (or guide), the use of technology, the opportunity to collaborate, the need to research, and the student-driven nature of the work.

 

Some interesting additional notes to consider include the placement of desks and use of space to facilitate the designed steps and tasks.  Monitoring computer use and managing the computers is not something I am overly concerned with.  If I am mobile in the classroom that helps students to stay on task.  If the daily lesson is still subdivided into multiple activities then the time the kids have to use the computers becomes more focused and the students are more efficient.  Giving too big of a block of time to do anything and anyone will wander (not just the attention of students).  

 

What I like most, which needs to be heavily emphasized, is the idea of surprise in pbl or ibl, meaning that teachers should not know exactly where their students are going to wind up, and, depending on the technologies available, not know what students are going to choose to construct their products.  True inquiry involves questions (perhaps some generated by the teacher, but some should come from he students), and unknown destination.  Teachers need to help set up the structures and processes (scaffolding, in eduspeak) to support student success, but students must own the topic, the path, and the destination to truly engage their interests.

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