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Bullies use social media to urge 12-year-old to kill herself

Bullies use social media to urge 12-year-old to kill herself | Technology and Communication | Scoop.it
Relentless online ridicule defeats mom's efforts to keep Rebecca Ann Sedwick from leaping to her death (“@CBSEveningNews: Bullies use social media to urge 12-year-old to kill herself, @CBSMMiller reports:
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Wireless company, students work to stop texting and driving - FOX19

Wireless company, students work to stop texting and driving - FOX19 | Technology and Communication | Scoop.it
Wireless company, students work to stop texting and driving FOX19 In an effort to increase local awareness of the dangers of texting while driving, AT&T has partnered with Cincinnati Public Schools, the Cincinnati Youth Collaborative and the Boys &...
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Broadcast Yourselfie: How teens use social media and why it matters to you - Brian Solis

Broadcast Yourselfie: How teens use social media and why it matters to you - Brian Solis | Technology and Communication | Scoop.it
Broadcast Yourselfie: How teens use social media and why it matters to you .- http://t.co/22x017obVs
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Too much texting linked to antisocial behaviour in children

Too much texting linked to antisocial behaviour in children | Technology and Communication | Scoop.it
Teenagers who send texts about rule breaking and drugs are more likely to participate in antisocial behaviour than their peers, claims the University of Texas.

Via Richard Leslie
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Kim & Kat's curator insight, June 14, 2015 12:58 PM

In this article, a study completed by the University of Texas shows that too much texting can be linked to antisocial behavior in children. In the study, teens were given free cell phones with free texting, which was monitored over the school year. The students knew about them being monitored however, which could have flawed the results (being more careful with what they say than they might have if they hadn't been screened). 

 

I'm really not at all surprised by the findings of the study. I think that texting allows for us to have more private conversations - no one can hear what we're saying other than the person we are texting, and we can easily delete any texts we don't want others to see. This could potentially encourage people to talk about "bad" things - maybe meeting up to drink underage, sexting, etc. For example it would be easy for a teenager to send sexually explicit texts to her boyfriend and then delete them, and her parents might never know what they were even talking about. It's also easier for cyberbullying to occur, as the 'Cyberbullying Research Center - resources and strategies to help address bullying and cyberbullying" article brings up. There are many more platforms for bullying than ever before.

 

However, as the article briefly mentions, texting is not only a bad thing. The study also found encouraging messages between the teens. I think it's important to take note of this fact because I don't find it necessary that parents snoop through their children's phones by any means, but it might be a good idea to watch for behavior in their children and then go from there. 

 

Texting allows for us to be in contact 24/7 with our friends. We can send them a text at 2:00 in the morning if we want to without worrying about waking them up like a phone call might. We don't even need smart phones to be able to text each other. We're at a time where almost everyone has access to text messaging, and it's important that we realize that just as with any other form of communication, there could be negative side affects.

 

Kathryn Opp