Technological Distraction
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Rescooped by Alex Nana-Sinkam from Studying Teaching and Learning
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Technology Creating a Generation of Distracted Students [STUDY]

Technology Creating a Generation of Distracted Students [STUDY] | Technological Distraction | Scoop.it
A new study by the Pew Research Center has found that though digital technology has reshaped the way students conduct research, it has been harmful in the way students process material and their overall ability to distinguish quality content from unreliable sources.

87% of teachers in the study — performed in conjunction with the College Board and the National Writing Project — said technology is creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans.” And 64% of teachers (from middle and high schools) say today’s digital technologies “do more to distract students than to help them academically.”


Via Stewart-Marshall
Alex Nana-Sinkam's insight:

PEW Internet study which grounds the relationship between technology and distraction (especially in students) in data and analytical research results. Good read for those who'd like to see the hard facts behind these notions of shortened attention spans in the digital age.

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Mindfulness in Schools: Richard Burnett at TEDxWhitechapel

Stop. Breathe. Pay attention. "Our mental health and well-being are profoundly affected by where and how we place our attention". In this enlightening talk, ...
Alex Nana-Sinkam's insight:

Puts a different spin on distraction by highlighting the importance of practicing mindfulness. Stresses the formal education system as a vehicle for teaching mindfulness practices and connects our ability to remain mindful to our ability to pay attention in the digital age. TED vets its speakers pretty well, which already gives Burnett a certain level of trustable mastery over the subject. He's also the co-founder of the Mindfulness in Schools project (mindfulnessinschools.org). 

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Katie Muirhead's curator insight, August 20, 2014 1:44 AM

"Our mental health and well-being are profoundly affected by where and how we place our attention", a very important video about the importance of mindulfness. Part of my Prezi presentation will be going into the reasons and techniques behind mindfulness, so this will be a very important source.

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Do Schools Need to Teach Kids How to Grow Their Attention Spans? | TakePart - Linkis.com

Do Schools Need to Teach Kids How to Grow Their Attention Spans? | TakePart - Linkis.com | Technological Distraction | Scoop.it
A British education official (and others) think yes. (Do Schools Need to Teach Kids How to Grow Their Attention Spans? http://t.co/LCbN0iGbfA)
Alex Nana-Sinkam's insight:

Great article on the role that education might potentially have in the future of mindfulness within an age of digital distraction. I personally believe that the formal education ecosystem will be one of the only tools we can use to reverse our growing attention deficiencies. Article contains great statistics and data driven insight.

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What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains [Epipheo.TV]

Most of us are on the Internet on a daily basis and whether we like it or not, the Internet is affecting us. It changes how we think, how we work, and it eve...
Alex Nana-Sinkam's insight:

I liked this source because it gives an interesting visual to what many attempt to explain via words. Understanding a concept via a different medium can have a pretty different affect on our comprehension--and this video is a good example of that. Beware, watch only if you're prepared to change your mindfulness habits when it comes to web use.

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Katie Muirhead's curator insight, August 20, 2014 1:40 AM

This short video has a very similar style of 'fast content' to my intended Prezi, and I think it tackles all the relevant information.  I think it is an interesting reflection that a video seems to be able to more clearly explain the topic of online distraction and infotention using the same techniques of rapid 'streams of thought' that it is describing. Very, very helpful!