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Technocare | Tecnocuidado
Materials for a debate on our lifes with technologies for collective (self-)care, independent living & urban accessibility | Materiales para un debate sobre nuestras vidas con tecnologías para el (auto)cuidado colectivo, la vida independiente y la accesibilidad urbana
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Las prótesis son muy caras: únete a los 'cacharreros' y fabrícalas tú mismo

Las prótesis son muy caras: únete a los 'cacharreros' y fabrícalas tú mismo | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Son capaces de replicar los productos ortopédicos que hay en el mercado de una forma mucho más original y sin hacer un gran desembolso. El movimiento 'maker' comienza a dominar las prótesis y la accesibilidad, y cada vez son más las iniciativas que surgen para dar de lado a la poderosa industria ortopédica. Proyectos frescos, nuevos y atrevidos (incluso sexualmente hablando).
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Aprender a afectarse: un enfoque procomún del trabajo social

Aprender a afectarse: un enfoque procomún del trabajo social | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Cada día son más los ciudadanos cuyos padecimientos no son medicalizables. Una veces porque los males tienen un carácter multicausal e incierto (pacientes crónicos), otras porque son el efecto mis...
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Centro Social de Salud Autogestionado de Hellinikós (Atenas)

En Grecia los Planes de Ajuste Estructural impuestos por la Troika han eliminado la sanidad pública. Para acceder al sistema de salud es necesario contratar un seguro…
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Opening up data to accelerate research for neglected diseases and global health | The Lancet Global Health Blog

Opening up data to accelerate research for neglected diseases and global health | The Lancet Global Health Blog | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
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A l’ACIC no ens fa cap gràcia el nou passeig de Gràcia

Denúncia pública de l’ACIC (Associació Catalana per a la Integració del Cec) que mostra el seriós perill que comporta la remodelació del nou passeig de Gràci...

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Hacking is the best medicine – The Uniter

Hacking is the best medicine – The Uniter | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
The concept of “hacking” might not seem to have anything to do with getting a broken arm casted or blood transfused.

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Wheelchairs or pushchairs: Who should take priority?

Wheelchairs or pushchairs: Who should take priority? | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
A court will decide whether wheelchair users have priority over pushchairs on buses, but how do you decide who is more entitled to the space?
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Shared Machine Shops as Real-life Laboratories » Journal of Peer Production

Shared Machine Shops as Real-life Laboratories » Journal of Peer Production | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it

From its very beginnings modernity could be described as a social formation which values innovation. It embraces the production of new ideas, practices and technologies. The task of innovation, however, was usually carried out by specialized experts (inventors, researchers, and developers) in specialized areas (laboratories of universities, research centers, and R&D departments).

As long as only a small sector of society engages in innovation it might be an exaggeration to speak of modernity as an innovation society, but in the light of recent developments the diagnosis of an innovation society is gaining new plausibility. Innovation has become heterogeneously distributed, ubiquitous, and reflexive: Innovation is increasingly produced by decentralized networks which involve actors from divergent social fields. Innovation therefore leaves the traditional sphere of the restricted laboratory and is transformed into an ubiquitous practice which is also adopted by non-professional as well as non-commercial actors like sports enthusiasts (Baldwin, Hienerth & von Hippel, 2006), private tinkerers (Baldwin & von Hippel, 2011), or „innovation communities” in general (von Hippel, 2006: 96). Hence, the growing knowledge about innovation also leads to a reflexivity of innovation itself (Hutter et al., 2011: 2), extends the scope of innovative practices, and transforms the very processes and structures of innovation: findings from the fields of open source software (Raymond, 2001; Kogut & Metiu, 2001), crowdsourcing (Brabham, 2008; Howe, 2010), or the modes of open-/user-based innovation mentioned above show evidence for these broader transformations.

Tomás Sánchez Criado's insight:

"[…] 3.1 The case of low-cost-prosthesis

 

The first case we want to introduce as an evidence for the conceptual aim of this paper is the one of “low-cost prosthesis”. Building on a collaboration between Amsterdam’s FabLab, the Indonesia-based House of Natural Fiber (HONF), which is a media and art laboratory in Yogyakarta as well as its associated FabLab (the “HONFablab Yogyakarta”), this project incorporates the principles of the FabLab Charta quite perfectly as it really draws on networking among different Fab-Labs, open knowledge sharing, and free access to community resources (http://fab.cba.mit.edu/about/charter/). The general aim of the low-cost prosthesis project is to explore how a developing country like Indonesia can become self-reliant in building prostheses for the cost of about $50. The need for this endeavor is obvious (see: http://www.lowcostprosthesis.org): First, due to the increasing rate of amputations, there is an ever-growing demand for prosthetic limbs especially in developing countries where insufficient supplies of public health services often leads to diabetes, gangrene, and infection. Second, there are significant problems in providing prosthetics to people in need due to the high cost for readily available prosthetic limbs, and the lack of expertise, which is mandatory for proper constructing, fitting, aligning, and adjusting of prosthetics.

To offer a solution for this pressing problem, the low-cost prosthesis project started to develop a lower knee prosthesis by approaching an inclusive open innovation process, where end users, designers, researchers and manufacturers can contribute in a joint effort (Waag 2009). The current state of the project is reflected by a prototype of the “$50 leg prosthesis” (see fig. 1) which was developed in 2012 after several workshops with experts from various related fields (e.g. rehabilitation, biomechatronics, biomedical engineering, orthopedic technology, design etc.).

Since the development of the low-cost prosthesis is still in its experimental phase, this solution is shielded in the niche of the FabLabs, which are engaged in this project. Nevertheless, the potentials to spread the orthopedic as well as construction-related knowledge and to empower the locals by creating new jobs at the same time are already obvious. Besides that, it also captures the very specifics of the experimental learning processes which we consider to be constitutive for the concept of real-life laboratories. Especially the documentation of workshops that were conducted during the project reveals this evidence. As mentioned above, these workshops were attended by experts from various professional disciplines as well as people who got engaged because of their FabLab background. This constellation apparently provided a fruitful setting for e.g. “an exchange of experiences by users on the techniques and the use of materials” or “the search for local materials, a number of design aspects, and an inexpensive and efficient production of quality parts that could raise the comfort of use” (Waag, 2009). This process of co-creation in connection with a social approach to design and manufacturing probably needs the niche of the FabLab, where failures are allowed, and visions are welcome. Since the project also builds on low barrier technologies (like digital fabrication), local materials, and DIY kits, the particular characteristics of decentralized and hands-on innovation development processes that are typical for shared machine shops also facilitated the work and progress of the low-cost prosthesis project"

 

"[…] the low-cost prosthesis project apparently aims to “stretch and transform” the existing regime for prosthesis supply in developing countries. We have to admit that this notion is rather speculative as the project still remains in its protective nurturing phase. Nevertheless, there are already a couple of hints that this transformative path can be expected. First, there is the constitutive aspect of cost: as stated on the project’s homepage “A typical limb made in a developing country costs approximately $125 to $1,875 USD. Our project aims at cutting the costs to as little as $41 USD (well below the $5,000-$15,000 USD average cost for a prosthesis in the western world)” (http://www.lowcostprosthesis.org/the-need). It becomes obvious that the main motivation for the low-cost prosthesis cannot be measured in terms of business criteria like e. g. monetary revenues or margins, but rather refers to ethical and social values which probably don’t reflect the common references in established fields of medicine technology and its distribution. Second, there is the strong ambition to spread orthopedic knowledge and enable locals to become skilled actors when it comes to the fabrication and adjustment of the prosthesis. This approach to knowledge transfer is important for the empowerment and self-reliance of the prospective users and blurs established boarders between experts and laypeople (Middel, 2011: 218-219). Third, there is also a claim to sustainability which shall be realized by using local materials like e. g. bamboo instead of aluminum. These aspects show that the overall approach of the project is strongly aligned with the needs of local communities. In terms of conventional research and development, this way of creating a novel prosthesis appears very unique. It is very likely that the diffusion of the prosthesis will extend this path which may also stretch the regime for medical health supply in a more general way."

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"[…] Following recent discussions on real-life experiments in science and technology studies, we will argue that experimentation is an important feature of innovation practices. Just like innovation, experimentation has also become a ubiquitous, heterogeneously distributed and reflexive practice. Especially in the recently emerged community- and peer-based forms of production, the freedom to experiment plays a major role. In contrast to the limitations of experiments embedded in hierarchies and the imperatives of formal organizations, peer communities provide settings where actors are primarily intrinsically motivated and free to join and leave these communities and this is likely to cause an increased freedom to experiment. We suggest that experimental practices are not something that happens in addition to other things going on in peer production contexts, but that peer production itself is a real-life-experiment in societal transformation."

 

"[…] Shared machines shops (SMS) are a perfect example of these new laboratory spaces. They embody the values of ubiquitous, heterogeneously distributed and reflexive experimentation. They provide new laboratory infrastructures outside of hierarchical organizations while being embedded in the digital and fluid networks of a new experimental culture. However, like social studies on laboratory life have shown, the boundaries between the laboratory and the rest of society are not absolute (Latour, 1983). We use two examples of innovations in shared machined shops (low-cost-prosthesis and open hardware 3D printers) to demonstrate that peer production as a new form of innovation is still in a fragile niche phase. It is surrounded by an innovation regime that implicates commercial logics and patterns of market regulation and thus reveals tensions with the particular practices of experimental exploration which are constitutive for the open and community-based approach of SMS."

 

"[…] Shared machine shops […] are framed as nuclei of collaborative grass-roots fabrication that could revolutionize and democratize manufacturing or may even replace capitalist patterns of production and consumption (Smith et al., 2013: 4). But are shared machine shops actually the constitutive elements of a new industrial revolution (Anderson, 2012), or will they remain idiosyncratic niches? We think that it is still too early to answer a question like this. Maybe the question itself is wrongly phrased. In this paper we will offer a different perspective on shared machine shops. These workshops can be taken as experimental settings where new visions, practices, and technologies are developed, tested, and refined. SMS are laboratories of a new kind. These laboratories are neither detached from society, nor are they only accessible for professionals. Instead, shared machine shops are real-life laboratories"

 

"[…] It might be wrong, however, to identify experiments with pure […] science in the first place. In his analysis of the relation between experiments and modernity, Krohn (2007) has shown that the semantics of experimentation can be found in heterogeneous contexts of modern life such as experimental literature, wars (as contexts for the experimental use of new weapons) and experimental forms of urban development. In all these contexts the term “experiment” is used to designate systematic learning practices by means of specific technical or social installations. Learning is not used as a normative term here, but as an analytical concept. Learning occurs if individuals or social systems break with established routines and create something new"

 

"[…] In experiments, social, technical and/or natural conditions are ordered and arranged in a specific way to encourage this kind of learning from irritations, and hence the establishment of new routines.

It is this systematic approach to learning by means of remodeling (material or immaterial) conditions that distinguishes experiments from those practices of trial and error that occur in everyday life on a regular basis, and sometimes even unintentionally. Experiments allow it to try something new and risky, and to accept the occurrence of failure. Furthermore, experimental settings make it possible to learn from those mistakes in a systematic manner. Experiments, therefore, combine an amount of freedom and control not usually found outside experimental settings."

 

"[…] In innovation societies the need for experimental learning has widely increased. In cases like genetic field experiments, prototyping in research and development, or beta releases of software products, experiments become real-life experiments (Krohn, 2007; Groß et al., 2003): Real-life experiments take place outside scientific laboratories. They don’t follow the logic of isolation and purification of laboratory experiments and typically include actors outside professional scientific contexts. Their objective is not the generalization of natural laws but the exploration of specific cases (Krohn, 2007: 349-354). Groß even suggests that nowadays controlled laboratory experiments have become the exception, while real-life experiments have become the norm (Groß, 2013: 196)"

 

"[…] Laboratories are not only closed rooms detached from the rest of society, they can be all kinds of (more or less protected) spaces in which the arrangements necessary for experimentation can be installed. Hence, laboratories are not only places in which facts are produced and reproduced but also – and maybe foremost – places that facilitate installations and constellations which enable irritation and learning (which again may or may not form the basis of new facts)."

 

"[…] In environmental science the concept of real-life laboratories (Schneidewind & Scheck, 2013) was recently developed to describe semi-protected spaces that are established for experiments between knowledge generation and knowledge application; where new kinds of socio-technical practices are developed and tested. A real-life laboratory is neither a closed room, designed to control all relevant experimental boundary conditions, nor a borderless space like “society”, “the market” or the “internet”. Real-life laboratories instead create a semi-open spatial and social microcosm, where failures are allowed, irritations are welcome, and learning is encouraged.

An important feature of real-life laboratories is their transdisciplinarity and openness. Not only certified experts can gain access to these places. They are rather spaces that encourage the interaction of experts and so-called “lay persons”, who might indeed be (uncertified) “experts” as well and who can contribute to ongoing real-life experiments. In the closed space of traditional laboratories in universities and R&D departments of firms, the presence of these non-certified experts would usually not be allowed (at most as “subjects” of an experiment or “visitors” to the laboratory) and their knowledge would be excluded from the processes of innovation, experimentation and collaborative learning (Collins & Evans, 2002)."

 

"[…] In their study of research “in the wild”, Callon and Rabeharisoa (2003) have shown that there is no intrinsic difference between expert knowledge and lay knowledge. “It would, for example, be wrong to say that the former are explicit and codified while the latter are tacit, or that the former are formalized while the latter are informal. Everything depends on the equipment used on both sides and, more broadly, the conditions “in which the expertise is produced” (ibid.: 196). Real-life laboratories can be conceived as laboratories “in the wild” in which the boundaries between expert and lay knowledge can get blurred even more, because real-life laboratories might provide the equipment and conditions for knowledge production typically associated with the world of scientific expertise."

 

"[…] Shared machine shops constitute a new environment for exploration in various fields of technology- and design-related topics […] typically organized around community-based principles  […] participation depends rather on common interests, shared values, and intrinsic motivation than on disciplinary boundaries and professions. Following this approach, shared machine shops offer new opportunities for collaboration and co-operation among heterogeneous actors that contribute their particular expertise and visions to any given context of shared interest. This often causes creative friction, which may either lead to small-scale inventions that serve the personal needs of its inventors, but in some cases also fosters solutions that could gain innovative momentum outside the shared machine shop, and beyond the initial motivations of the actors involved".

 

"[…] Compared to visions that take SMS as forerunners of a new industrial revolution (Anderson, 2012), our interpretation of SMS as real-life laboratories offers a different framing. Innovations in shared machine shops are a step closer to the laboratory “world on probation” (Krohn, 2007: 348, translated by the authors) than to the sphere of production. To expect them to overthrow centralized forms of industrial production might therefore demand too much of these still fragile niches which have to handle the ambivalence between experimental freedom and socio-economic pressures."

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MICHELLE MURPHY /// Economization of Life: Biopolitical Feminism & Chemical Infrastructures « ARCHIPELAGO

Conversation recorded with Michelle Murphy in Toronto on June 21, 2014

 

This conversation with Michelle Murphy is divided into two parts:

BIOPOLITICAL FEMINISM: The first part introduces Foucault’s concept of biopolitics and applies it to forms of economization of life particularly in relation to female bodies. Paraphrasing Foucault, Michelle affirms that governmental capitalism needs for “some must not to be born so that future others will live more consumptibly, productively in the logic of macro-economy .” She thus unfolds the political history of regulation and ‘marketing’ of reproduction and contraception that organizes such an economization of life at a scale of a population. Further, we discuss of Michelle’s concept, “The Girl” as the problematic current vessel of financial investment in the context of imperial humanitarianism.

 

CHEMICAL INFRASTRUCTURES: The second part considers the body as topological, blurring the limits between inside and outside and, following Peter Sloterdijk think of it as a “being-in-the-breathable.” Michelle has been working on the elaboration of the concept of “chemical infrastructures” to think of our era as the Anthropocene: a time when all atmospheres are fundamentally manufactured (deliberately or not) by human activity. Following Spinoza and his approach of the Genesis’s apple, we talk of our ignorance, as humans, of what ecologies really are, and how we can start thinking of them as ethical systems rather than moralistic ones.

 

Michelle Murphy is a Professor in the History Department and Women and Gender Studies Institute at the University of Toronto, with graduate appointments in Science and Technology Studies at York University and the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at U of T. She is an organizer of the Toronto Technoscience Salon.  I am also coordinator of the Technoscience Research Unit. She is the author of Seizing the Means of Reproduction: Entanglements of Feminism, Health, and Technoscience (Duke UP, 2012) and Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty: Environmental Politics, Technoscience, and Women Workers (Duke UP, 2006), as well as the co-editor of Landscapes of Exposure: Knowledge and Exposure in Modern Environments, Osiris v. 19 (University of Chicago Press, 2004).

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MICHELLE MURPHY /// Economization of Life: Part 1: Biopolitical Feminism

Conversation recorded with Michelle Murphy in Toronto on June 21, 2014
http://the-archipelago.net/2014/07/06/michelle-murphy-economization-of-life-part-1-biopolitical-feminism/
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Michelle Murphy - Seizing the Means of Reproduction: Entanglements of Feminism, Health, and Technoscience

Michelle Murphy - Seizing the Means of Reproduction: Entanglements of Feminism, Health, and Technoscience | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it

In Seizing the Means of Reproduction, Michelle Murphy's initial focus on the alternative health practices developed by radical feminists in the United States during the 1970s and 1980s opens into a sophisticated analysis of the transnational entanglements of American empire, population control, neoliberalism, and late-twentieth-century feminisms. Murphy concentrates on the technoscientific means—the technologies, practices, protocols, and processes—developed by feminist health activists. She argues that by politicizing the technical details of reproductive health, alternative feminist practices aimed at empowering women were also integral to late-twentieth-century biopolitics.

Murphy traces the transnational circulation of cheap, do-it-yourself health interventions, highlighting the uneasy links between economic logics, new forms of racialized governance, U.S. imperialism, family planning, and the rise of NGOs. In the twenty-first century, feminist health projects have followed complex and discomforting itineraries. The practices and ideologies of alternative health projects have found their way into World Bank guidelines, state policies, and commodified research. While the particular moment of U.S. feminism in the shadow of Cold War and postcolonialism has passed, its dynamics continue to inform the ways that health is governed and politicized today.

 

 

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Els arquitectes del futur milloren l'accessibilitat

Els arquitectes del futur milloren l'accessibilitat | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Alumnes arquitectura accessibilitat Barcelona. (Redacció).- Els alumnes de l’ Escola Tècnica Superior d’Arquitectura de
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Rampas vs escaleras o ¿Donde está el Diseño Universal? | Xavi Duacastilla

Presentación basada en la ponencia que tuve el honor de impartir en la PECHAKUCHA NIGHT volumen 20 La parte y el todo.

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Handiwheel, movilidad de bajo coste

Handiwheel, movilidad de bajo coste | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Con Handiwheel conviertes tu silla de ruedas manual en un vehículo de autonomía personal reutilizando un patinete eléctrico de bajo coste.

Handiwheel es un sistema casero de sujeción y tracción a motor eléctrico exclusivo que no modifica silla de ruedas y que permite ser conectado de un modo fácil y cómodo.


Se me ocurrió al ver tanta gente yendo por el paseo de la Barceloneta con patinetes y pensé ¿por que yo no puedo usar un patinete con la silla de ruedas? Compré un patinete eléctrico de 300w y estuve pensando como modificarlo para que se pudiera poner y quitar facilmente y me permitiese circular por la ciudad sin esfuerzo y sin gastarme mucho dinero. Creé la web para que la gente la viera y se lo pudiese hacer uno mismo y si no saben o no quieren hacerlo les hecho una mano.

 

Para más información visitar la web http://handiwheel.wordpress.com

 

 

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Cuerpos abyectos entrelazando vidas - Somateca. Jornadas crip-queer

Cuerpos abyectos entrelazando vidas - Somateca. Jornadas crip-queer | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Las alianzas entre sujetos entendidos como abyectos, según los parámetros de la normalidad capitalista, se han multiplicado en los últimos años.
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En busca de la Vida Independiente

En busca de la Vida Independiente | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Debemos cambiar la forma de entender la discapacidad y el actual sistema de ayudas. Un asistente personal es clave en la vida de un discapacitado

Via Expdem
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Belén Martín consigue el tratamiento de hepatitis C para su marido tras su huelga de hambre | Periódico Diagonal

Belén Martín consigue el tratamiento de hepatitis C para su marido tras su huelga de hambre | Periódico Diagonal | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
La Plataforma de Afectados por la Hepatitis C la acompañó ayer lunes a la en su protesta.
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En huelga de hambre para conseguir el fármaco que ‘cura’ la hepatitis C

En huelga de hambre para conseguir el fármaco que ‘cura’ la hepatitis C | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Belén Martín exige que a su marido Saturnino le administren el caro tratamiento que tiene autorizado desde el 20 de octubre
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BANCO DE AYUDAS TÉCNICAS

BANCO DE AYUDAS TÉCNICAS | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Reciclamos elementos de ayuda para personas con algún tipo de discapacidad o movilidad reducida para su reutilización
By: ASJ
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Disabled man forced off bus by refusal to move pram sparks equality test case

Disabled man forced off bus by refusal to move pram sparks equality test case | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Appeal court weighs legal duty of transport operators to enforce wheelchair users’ priority over other passengers
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Cuando el apoyo mutuo te puede salvar la vida | Periódico Diagonal

Cuando el apoyo mutuo te puede salvar la vida | Periódico Diagonal | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it
Francisco José Lema se suicidó ante el acoso del banco. Jose Coy encontró la fuerza para luchar contra la depresión en las redes de apoyo mutuo.
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MICHELLE MURPHY /// Economization of Life: Part 2: Chemical Infrastructures

Conversation recorded with Michelle Murphy in Toronto on June 21, 2014
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Choice and control are still key for people with disabilities

Choice and control are still key for people with disabilities | Technocare | Tecnocuidado | Scoop.it

The challenge now is to find new and creative ways to deliver care and support


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Martyn Sibley: My Accessible Adventures in Catalonia

My Accessible Adventures in Catalonia by Martyn Sibley
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A collaborative medical data platform to help rare disease research | Jone Ojinaga | TEDxMadrid

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. How might we help rare disease research using our medical records? This is the challenge launched by last year's TedxMadrid audience to the H2i Institute students. It is tough to obtain medical records when we talk about rare diseases: there are not many, they are difficult to access and there is not a standard format yet. This project involves an on-line platform which tries to deal with all this difficulties.


Via jean lievens
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