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Will Machine Translation Ever Beat Human Translation? - Voice Over Times

Will Machine Translation Ever Beat Human Translation? - Voice Over Times | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Voice Over Times
Will Machine Translation Ever Beat Human Translation?
Voice Over Times
The idea of a future where people can communicate effortlessly with each other in different languages, translated perfectly by machines, is a seductive one.
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This Karnataka Village Still Upholds The Rich Legacy Of Sanskrit. It Is Their Official Language

This Karnataka Village Still Upholds The Rich Legacy Of Sanskrit. It Is Their Official Language | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
A perfect example of how modernity and tradition can coexist.
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Rescooped by Sue Clark from All Language Alliance, Inc.- Certified Legal Translation Services- www.languagealliance.com - www.translationforlawyers.com
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Norweigan? Published a Book? Your Government Will Automatically Buy 1,000 Copies

Norweigan? Published a Book? Your Government Will Automatically Buy 1,000 Copies | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
And other reasons Norway is the best place in the world to be a writer.

Via All Language Alliance, Inc. - Certified Legal Translation Company - www.languagealliance.com
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Out of the cage: Rethinking robotics | In-depth | The Engineer

Out of the cage: Rethinking robotics | In-depth | The Engineer | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
A new breed of robots is emerging that could help labour-intensive industries to cut costs and boost efficiency.
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McDonald's future isn't about America anymore

McDonald's future isn't about America anymore | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Closures are outpacing openings in America, but the overseas market is thriving.
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Experts study why Dutch people are so tall - BBC News

Experts study why Dutch people are so tall - BBC News | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Dutch people are on average the world's tallest people, but it hasn't always been this way. So why is the Netherlands such a height capital?
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The 10 companies young people in Europe want to work for the most

The 10 companies young people in Europe want to work for the most | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Employer branding specialists, Universum, surveyed over 180,000 students from Europe's 12 largest economies.
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Why the Internet of Things is called Internet of Things

Why the Internet of Things is called Internet of Things | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
A comprehensive Internet of Things definition, a look at the IoT history from its birth in 1999 to now and an explanation of IoT vs M2M vs IoE vs Others.

Via Margarida Sá Costa
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Richard Platt's curator insight, February 7, 12:02 AM

Just in case you didn't have an understanding of where all of these technologies fit within one another.

Renato Machado Costa's curator insight, February 14, 9:32 PM

Very nice IoT definitions and insights!

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Testing Out the Best Translation Apps for Travelers

Testing Out the Best Translation Apps for Travelers | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Here’s what T+L tech correspondent Tom Samiljan uncovered while testing the latest translation apps while traveling throughout Europe and Asia.
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Scientists have used graphene to produce the world's thinnest light bulb

Scientists have used graphene to produce the world's thinnest light bulb | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

For the first time ever, researchers have managed to produce visible light using graphene as a filament, creating the world's tiniest light bulb. 


Researchers have been struggling for decades to produce a light source small enough to fit on a silicon chip as it will help them to create super-fast computers that process light instead of electricity - and now they've shown that wonder-material graphene, which also happens to be incredibly thin, light and flexible, can do just that.


Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, June 16, 5:30 PM

A tiny strip of grapheme as a tuneable light source ... very interesting and I think it has great potential, but we still have to learn how to put it to use...

Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, June 16, 5:31 PM

A tiny strip of grapheme as a tuneable light source ... very interesting and I think it has great potential, but we still have to learn how to put it to use...

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Want to save time and money when placing a translation project? | Midland Technical, Technical Translation Agency offering an International Technical Translation Service

Want to save time and money when placing a translation project? | Midland Technical, Technical Translation Agency offering an International Technical Translation Service | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Want to save time and money when placing a translation project? -
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Cultural differences in attitudes to time: tips for exporters | UKTI blog

Cultural differences in attitudes to time: tips for exporters | UKTI blog | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
News and updates from UKTI
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Ugly attitudes towards Maori language - New Zealand Herald

Ugly attitudes towards Maori language - New Zealand Herald | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
It's no secret that the Maori language is in a vulnerable state.
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Futuristic Components on Silicon Chips Fabricated Successfully

Futuristic Components on Silicon Chips Fabricated Successfully | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

A team of IBM researchers in Zurich, Switzerland with support from colleagues in Yorktown Heights, New York has developed a relatively simple, robust and versatile process for growing crystals made from compound semiconductor materials that will allow them be integrated onto silicon wafers -- an important step toward making future computer chips that will allow integrated circuits to continue shrinking in size and cost even as they increase in performance.

Appearing this week on the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing, the work may allow an extension to Moore's Law, the famous observation by Gordon Moore that the number of transistors on an integrated circuit double about every two years. In recent years some in the industry have speculated that our ability to keep pace with Moore's Law may become exhausted eventually unless new technologies come along that will lend it leash.

"The whole semiconductor industry wants to keep Moore’s Law going. We need better performing transistors as we continue down-scaling, and transistors based on silicon won’t give us improvements anymore," said Heinz Schmid, a researcher with IBM Research GmbH at Zurich Research Laboratory in Switzerland and the lead author on the paper.

For consumers, extending Moore's Law will mean continuing the trend of new computer devices having increasing speed and bandwidth at reduced power consumption and cost. The new technique may also impact photonics on silicon, with active photonic components integrated seamlessly with electronics for greater functionality.

How the Work was Done: The IBM team fabricated single crystal nanostructures, such as nanowires, nanostructures containing constrictions, and cross junctions, as well as 3-D stacked nanowires, made with so-called III–V materials. Made from alloys of indium, gallium and arsenide, III-V semiconductors are seen as a possible future material for computer chips, but only if they can be successfully integrated onto silicon. So far efforts at integration have not been very successful.

The new crystals were grown using an approach called template-assisted selective epitaxy (TASE) using metal organic chemical vapor deposition, which basically starts from a small area and evolves into a much larger, defect-free crystal. This approach allowed them to lithographically define oxide templates and fill them via epitaxy, in the end making nanowires, cross junctions, nanostructures containing constrictions and 3-D stacked nanowires using the already established scaled processes of Si technology.

"What sets this work apart from other methods is that the compound semiconductor does not contain detrimental defects, and that the process is fully compatible with current chip fabrication technology," said Schmid. "Importantly the method is also economically viable."  

He added that more development will be required to achieve the same control over performance in III-V devices as currently exists for silicon. But the new method is the key to actually integrating the stacked materials on the silicon platform, Schmid said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The UK needs over one million new engineers, says the Royal Academy of Engineering

The UK needs over one million new engineers, says the Royal Academy of Engineering | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The UK will need more than a million new engineers and technicians in the next five years, but despite the skills shortage women still account for less than 10 per cent of the sector’s workforce.
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Chemists devise technology that could transform solar energy storage from microseconds to weeks

Chemists devise technology that could transform solar energy storage from microseconds to weeks | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it

A new technology developed by chemists at UCLA is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks. 


The materials in most of today’s residential rooftop solar panels can store energy from the sun for only a few microseconds at a time. A new technology developed by chemists at UCLA is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks — an advance that could change the way scientists think about designing solar cells.


The findings are published June 19 in the journal Science. The new design is inspired by the way that plants generate energy through photosynthesis.


“Biology does a very good job of creating energy from sunlight,” said Sarah Tolbert, a UCLA professor of chemistry and one of the senior authors of the research. “Plants do this through photosynthesis with extremely high efficiency.”


“In photosynthesis, plants that are exposed to sunlight use carefully organized nanoscale structures within their cells to rapidly separate charges — pulling electrons away from the positively charged molecule that is left behind, and keeping positive and negative charges separated,” Tolbert said. “That separation is the key to making the process so efficient.”


To capture energy from sunlight, conventional rooftop solar cells use silicon, a fairly expensive material.  There is currently a big push to make lower-cost solar cells using plastics, rather than silicon, but today’s plastic solar cells are relatively inefficient, in large part because the separated positive and negative electric charges often recombine before they can become electrical energy.


“Modern plastic solar cells don’t have well-defined structures like plants do because we never knew how to make them before,” Tolbert said. “But this new system pulls charges apart and keeps them separated for days, or even weeks. Once you make the right structure, you can vastly improve the retention of energy.”


The two components that make the UCLA-developed system work are a polymer donor and a nano-scale fullerene acceptor. The polymer donor absorbs sunlight and passes electrons to the fullerene acceptor; the process generates electrical energy.


The plastic materials, called organic photovoltaics, are typically organized like a plate of cooked pasta — a disorganized mass of long, skinny polymer “spaghetti” with random fullerene “meatballs.” But this arrangement makes it difficult to get current out of the cell because the electrons sometimes hop back to the polymer spaghetti and are lost.


The UCLA technology arranges the elements more neatly — like small bundles of uncooked spaghetti with precisely placed meatballs. Some fullerene meatballs are designed to sit inside the spaghetti bundles, but others are forced to stay on the outside.  The fullerenes inside the structure take electrons from the polymers and toss them to the outside fullerene, which can effectively keep the electrons away from the polymer for weeks.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ra's curator insight, June 23, 5:27 PM

"A new technology developed by chemists at UCLA is capable of storing solar energy for up to several weeks."

changes to solar panel construction that could do away with the need for bulky battery storage or any connection to the grid. Rural camp site looking brighter, although maybe somewhere in the future. 

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I Put a Spell On You | Opinion

I Put a Spell On You | Opinion | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
In Russian, and therefore in Russia, a lot of people, things and actions are charming. When the charm is pleasant — a song, a cute kid, a puppy — speakers often use the verb pair очаровывать/очаровать (to charm) and related words.
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Tissue engineering: Organs from the lab - Nature.com

Tissue engineering: Organs from the lab - Nature.com | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The body's organs are more complex than any factory. Attempts to mirror their physiology in the laboratory are getting closer to capturing their intricacies.
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The Vocabularist: Where does the term 'Magna Carta' come from? - BBC News

The Vocabularist: Where does the term 'Magna Carta' come from? - BBC News | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The two words may have been combined by accident.
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This Font Simulates What It's Like To Have Dyslexia

This Font Simulates What It's Like To Have Dyslexia | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
In the world of advertising, most campaign posters are designed to be read easily by anyone from a distance and at close range. What marks graphic designer Daniel Britton’s font as distinct is that, when formed into complete sentences, the words are a challenge to read in order to emulate exactly how frustrating dyslexia can be. Believing dyslexia to be misunderstood and under-researched, Britton designed the font and these images in his final year at university to raise awareness of the conditi
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Of Cabbages and Kings: five ways to talk about translation | OxfordWords blog

Of Cabbages and Kings: five ways to talk about translation | OxfordWords blog | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Translation has been a crucial part of Anglophone culture from its very beginnings. The earliest English writers knew that the state of learning in England
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There’s nothing sadder than EBacc without teachers | Laura McInerney

There’s nothing sadder than EBacc without teachers | Laura McInerney | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Ministers’ plans will mean GCSE pupils studying subjects they don’t want to, taught by teachers unfamiliar with the topic
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Japan's 30 best travel destinations, as chosen by overseas visitors - RocketNews24

Japan's 30 best travel destinations, as chosen by overseas visitors - RocketNews24 | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Just in time for the peak summer travel season, website TripAdvisor has released its annual list of the highest-rated spots in Japan from its foreign users.
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Patrice Banks: Why I quit my engineering job to be a mechanic

Patrice Banks: Why I quit my engineering job to be a mechanic | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
The auto-repair industry discriminates, so I joined them, she says.
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Lost in translation: Why Japan does whisky bars better

Lost in translation: Why Japan does whisky bars better | Technical Translations and more | Scoop.it
Japanese whisky bars have become a bit mythologised. You know, that Lost in Translation aesthetic, equal parts depressing and sophisticated as all hell.
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