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How to use QR codes in research and teaching

How to use QR codes in research and teaching | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
You have seen QR codes in ads, but do they make sense for academics? This post discusses why, when and how you can use QR codes in research and teaching.

Via Jon Samuelson
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

I have a cousin in the UK who has a Master's in Educational Technology, and I remember us having a conversation several weeks ago about the use of QR codes. She said they were everywhere in Europe and very heavily used not only for advertisements, but also being highly touted in ed tech circles over there. I told her that I hadn't seen it as much here, but I didn't doubt that it could work. 

 

Then, just yesterday during my first day of work at the new job, my new manager took me to the company's "Innovation Center", which is like a small visitor's center, to show some of the latest innovations of the company. And sure enough, since the entire Innovation Center is meant to be a highly interactive learning tool in a confined space, I saw the use of the QR codes there. Of course, the global headquarters of the company is based in Germany, so in that respect, I wasn't surprised that the QR codes were being used based on what my cousin had told me. But I was pleased to see how they were effective in providing additional information. At certain stations in the room, there would be a tablet with a a built-in camera in front of a small stand up display of a photo with a QR code. To learn more about the particular product or process, the visitor would just take a photo of the QR code, and voila! Video and other interactive content would display on the tablet. It was actually very cool. 

 

This article is really good because it's a great primer for how to use QR codes effectively. This is a must read! 
--techcommgeekmom 

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M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications
A collection of all the tech comm topics I find most timely or helpful, with a special emphasis on e-learning and m-learning
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Staylittle: The village that is cut off from the UK - BBC News

Staylittle: The village that is cut off from the UK - BBC News | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Some people do "digital detoxes", but there is one place in the UK that is getting rather annoyed at being cut off.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

This is an interesting article to me, because I think many developed countries take for granted the connectivity that they have, and yet, there are still areas even in developed countries, like this town in Wales, that still isn't connected--and they just lost their one means of connectivity with simple telephone landlines.  I know that I use one mobile carrier in particular because I can get coverage at my home as needed. I'd like to switch to another carrier, but their coverage map doesn't even cover my entire town! The ironic thing is that I'm set between the main corporate headquarters of Dow Jones (publisher of the Wall Street Journal)--I can walk or bike to their entrance, as well as the North American Headquarters and additional offices of big pharma companies like Novo Nordisk and Bristol-Myers Squibb, and dozens of other companies are just down the street from me. 

 

What do you think of this situation? It seems like it'd be a fairly simple solution, considering they aren't that far out from the nearest towns. What's the connectivity like where you live? Generally where I live, it's not too bad, but then again, I live in between New York City and Philadelphia in a very populated area near one of the most prestigious universities in the world and several large corporations nearby.  I know not everyone has that. 

 

Add your comments below.

--techcommgeekmom

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20 Signs Your Web Content Writer Won't Cut Through the Crap

20 Signs Your Web Content Writer Won't Cut Through the Crap | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
I was on vacation in Vancouver with my family recently. We went to the famous public market on Granville Island. There’s a lot to see and do there. The market seems to offer every flavor of everyt
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Craig Cardimon found this Barry Feldman gem and posted it on LinkedIn. I think all writers have moments of falling prey to some of these mistakes. As kids we are taught to write with more flourish, and these 20 signs are easy tools to accomplish more florid writing. Marketing is FULL of this kind of writing, and has been for years. What has changed? I think, as a society, we've tired of this kind of language, and we are looking for less rubbish, and more intelligent content--on multiple levels. 

 

What do you think of these 20 signs? Add your comments below. 

--techcommgeekmom

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10 popular grammar myths debunked by a Harvard linguist

10 popular grammar myths debunked by a Harvard linguist | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Harvard's Steven Pinker sets the record straight.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

This is a great article that goes over some basic grammatical misnomers that are often made. Many of these are not only covered in Steven Pinker's writings, but Marcia Riefer Johnston also writes about these and other similar topics in her book, "Word Up!" 

 

The author of this article also references H.W. Fowler, who was the author of "The Dictionary of Modern Usage", which was the first book of its kind that I used. I found it helpful on many occasions. 

 

I'll have to check out more of Steven Pinker's works in the near future. 

 

Do you agree with the rules mentioned in this article? Comment below. 

--techcommgeekmom

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The Ultimate List of #TechComm Resources

The Ultimate List of #TechComm Resources | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Here you are! My ultimate list of techcomm resources.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Wow! I've never been included in a list like this before! And I'm included with such great company, as well! 

 

Thank you, Greta Boller, for including me in this list! I truly appreciate it! :-) 

 

Check out some of the other listings as well. Greta's made some very good choices here, and I would recommend these choices as well! 

 

--techcommgeekmom

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Changing languages: Irish and Hebrew | OUPblog

Changing languages: Irish and Hebrew | OUPblog | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
In the literature on language death and language renewal, two cases come up again and again: Irish and Hebrew. Mention of the former language is usually attended by a whiff of disapproval. It was abandoned relatively recently by a majority of the Irish people in favour of English, and hence is quoted as an example of a people rejecting their heritage. Hebrew, on the other hand, is presented as a model of linguistic good behaviour: not only was it not rejected by its own people, it was even reviv
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

This is an interesting article that centers on the evolution of the Irish and Hebrew languages, but I think some of the bigger points could apply to any language that continues to be used and is evolving.  I think part of what's going on now with Irish language is that there's a big effort in Ireland to try to revive the language so that it doesn't die altogether. Having travelled to Ireland twice this past year, I can say firsthand that most signs are listed in Irish first, then English second. Ireland is reclaiming its heritage more than ever now, especially with the 100th anniversary of the 1916 revolution coming up. It will be interesting to see how the resurgence of bringing back Irish as a dominant language will evolve in coming years. 

 

Of my tech comm friends who speak Hebrew (and I know there are a few of you), how do you think that re-emergence of Hebrew has gone as people have slowly moved away from Yiddish--or is Yiddish still prevelant enough that Yiddish hasn't gone away either? I'd be curious to hear your take on it. 

 

Languages and linguistcs are fascinating!

--techcommgeekmom

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DKW Online's curator insight, August 9, 2:49 AM

This is an interesting article that centers on the evolution of the Irish and Hebrew languages, but I think some of the bigger points could apply to any language that continues to be used and is evolving.  I think part of what's going on now with Irish language is that there's a big effort in Ireland to try to revive the language so that it doesn't die altogether. Having travelled to Ireland twice this past year, I can say firsthand that most signs are listed in Irish first, then English second. Ireland is reclaiming its heritage more than ever now, especially with the 100th anniversary of the 1916 revolution coming up. It will be interesting to see how the resurgence of bringing back Irish as a dominant language will evolve in coming years. 

 

Of my tech comm friends who speak Hebrew (and I know there are a few of you), how do you think that re-emergence of Hebrew has gone as people have slowly moved away from Yiddish--or is Yiddish still prevelant enough that Yiddish hasn't gone away either? I'd be curious to hear your take on it. 

 

Languages and linguistcs are fascinating!

--techcommgeekmom

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How Tupperware’s Inventor Left a Legacy That’s Anything but Airtight

How Tupperware’s Inventor Left a Legacy That’s Anything but Airtight | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Earl S. Tupper — and his trailblazing marketing guru, Brownie Wise — forever changed food storage. His story is stranger than fiction
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Ken Ronkowitz posted this on LinkedIn, and asked if perhaps this was social networking before it was cool. Having owned a party-based business during my lifetime for a short stint during my stay-at-home mom days, I was immediately drawn to this story. I would confirm that yes, Tupperware parties--and other party-based businesses like it--definitely are the pre-cursor to social networking as we know it today. Now, social media wasn't around when I had my business back then. It had barely begun online activity at all before the business that I chose (or at least that branch of the company) went under/closed shop. I wonder how I would've done if it had been now instead of then? 

 

What do you think? 

--techcommgeekmom

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Jean-Pierre Blanger's curator insight, August 2, 4:30 PM

Ken Ronkowitz posted this on LinkedIn, and asked if perhaps this was social networking before it was cool. Having owned a party-based business during my lifetime for a short stint during my stay-at-home mom days, I was immediately drawn to this story. I would confirm that yes, Tupperware parties--and other party-based businesses like it--definitely are the pre-cursor to social networking as we know it today. Now, social media wasn't around when I had my business back then. It had barely begun online activity at all before the business that I chose (or at least that branch of the company) went under/closed shop. I wonder how I would've done if it had been now instead of then? 

 

What do you think? 

--techcommgeekmom

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Tony Fadell: What will Google's $3.2bn guru do next? - BBC News

Tony Fadell: What will Google's $3.2bn guru do next? - BBC News | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Will the designer in charge of Google Glass and Nest's "thoughtful home" kit end up eclipsing his former workmate Jony Ive?
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

This is a really interesting article about the guy that Google has employed to help with a lot of their big gadget-related products. I think he's got some great insights, based on this article and video interview, and it will be interesting how he takes these projects to the next level. I agree that wearables are still in their infancy, so as the guy who essentially helped to bring some of my favorite mobile devices to life, it'll be interesting to see where he takes Google Glass as well as some of those other IoT items out there. 

--techcommgeekmom

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Lowering the bar

Lowering the bar | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
I recently saw a job posting in which the first line under "Responsibilities" went like this: ....deliver [content] that engages audiences, and that is virtually free of spelling, grammar, and form...
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Larry Kunz has written a compelling article about job responsibilities as a technical communicator, and there's an interesting discussion going on in the comments. I encourage you to check it out and include your own comments. Is Larry asking too much in his observation? 

--techcommgeekmom

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How to Create a Content Strategy Plan - Elcom Mobile Site - Elcom Mobile Site

How to Create a Content Strategy Plan - Elcom Mobile Site - Elcom Mobile Site | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:
Not sure if I've posted this before. Good info. Thanks to Kerry Butters for curating this and posting on Twitter. --techcommgeekmom
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Why WordPress Is the Ultimate Platform For the Self-Employed? - CMS2CMS

Why WordPress Is the Ultimate Platform For the Self-Employed? - CMS2CMS | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
The article shows the specific reasons which make Wordpress a suitable platform for self-employed people.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

As a new self-employed entrepreneur, I can say that while my business website (daircomm.com) hasn't started out as a WP site, one of my requirements for a hosting provider was that it could become a WP site if I changed my mind later. I could decide initially whether to make my site a WP site or not, and since my husband is a developer and wanted to help, he made suggestions on the current design that is not WP. Maybe that will change. But TechCommGeekMom is most definitely a WP site, albeit one that's hosted as a Wordpress.com site rather than self-hosted. Even so, based on my experiences using WP for TechCommGeekMom as well as on other websites I've worked on that use the platform, I support what the author says in this article. WP really is a great tool to use! 

 

What do you think of WordPress, especially in the context of being self-employed? Include your comments below. 

--techcommgeekmom

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How the Hell do I Prioritize Work, Blog & Find Balance? | Bothsides of the Table

How the Hell do I Prioritize Work, Blog & Find Balance? | Bothsides of the Table | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
I noticed this post today from Ezra Galston titled R …
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Darin Hammond curated and posted this article on Google+, and boy, does it hit the mark right now. It's been harder for me to blog these days, just because I've been busy. As I write this, I just got back from a conference a mere 2.5 hours ago. I know I don't always find the balance. Now that I'm going to be working for myself, and working to gather a clientele (and help the clientele I have for the moment), I need to figure out how to find that balance between getting some good blog posts in again, and working on getting other things done as well. (Not today, I'm exhausted and I think the jet lag will hit any minute.) But I also take my time writing, because I want to make sure I write something that has some value, and that it's written well (or at least half-decently). 

 

For me, family duties and duties to myself come before career. I do what I do for my career because I enjoy the field. It doesn't consume my life, however. I'd like to think I am more multi-faceted than that. Thus the struggle for balance continues and will probably always continue...

--techcommgeekmom

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How Irish language words helped create the English language

How Irish language words helped create the English language | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
You dig it? The English language's terminology for concepts and the mind is peppered with Hiberno-English.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Since I'm on a language kick today, and I'm leaving for another trip to Ireland (for the IEEE ProComm in Limerick, Ireland) in a few days, this seemed appropriate. Gaelige still eludes me phonetically. I always feel like once I get the phonetics down, then the rest becomes easier. I guess someday I might figure it out. 

 

This is an interesting article about how Irish language has influenced English language. 

--techcommgeekmom

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Here’s what Shakespeare’s plays sounded like with their original English accent

Here’s what Shakespeare’s plays sounded like with their original English accent | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
In this short documentary, linguist David Crystal and his son, actor Ben Crystal, look at the differences between English pronunciation now and how it was spoken 400 years ago. They answer the most basic question you probably have right now — How do you...
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

This is something that I've been meaning to post for a while, but it slipped away. I think today is English localization day for me. Anyway, David Crystal is THE man you want to read or learn from if you want to learn about linguistics, especially English language linguistics. I've never read a resource that didn't reference him in some way. Even reading his works directly yield great insights. 

 

Check out this fantastic video that shows how pronunciation alone can change how language is perceived. After that, think about how English (or any other language that has multiple dialects) sounds today in various countries. It's incredible that we all still understand each other at all! I also find it fascinating that perception of the dialect can change the meaning. Listen to what Ben Crystal says towards the end of how one speech changed meaning and how the actors perceived the "OD" dialects. 

 

(I think I missed out on a career in linguistics...fascinating stuff to me...)

--techcommgeekmom

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World-renowned Harvard linguist Steven Pinker loves emoji, and you should too

World-renowned Harvard linguist Steven Pinker loves emoji, and you should too | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
There's no shame in emoji love.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

I guess it's Steven Pinker day at TechCommGeekMom. I have to agree that I often will use emoji for the purposes that Pinker suggests in this article. My son finds that in situations where he is remote and trying to convey his feelings, he will use emoji quite a lot. The message still gets through to me in his text messaging. 

 

What do you think of emojis and how they are used? Add your thoughts to the comments below. 

--techcommgeekmom

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Why is there a divide between academics and practitioners in tech comm? • emoo.eu

Why is there a divide between academics and practitioners in tech comm? Tip: Check out the podcast I recorded on this same topic here: Podcast: The divide between academics and practitioners — Interview with Lisa Meloncon. The divide between practitioners and academics TechCommGeekMom recently attended IEEE ProComm in Ireland and wrote an interesting post highlighting the divide that exists between practitioners and academics. I've been interested in this divide for some time. In some regards,
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Thanks to EMOO.EU for featuring and commenting my article. It was interesting to read, because I realized that the quotes must have been translated from English to another language back to English!  I need to work more on writing more standard or neutral English, it appears! 

 

In the meantime, the author and I seem to be coming to similar conclusions about the divide between academia and practitioners, and the author makes some valid recommendations to help bridge that gap at the end of the article. 

 

What do you think? Do you agree with this author's position? Do you agree with the recommentations? Comment below. 

--techcommgeekmom

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Content Content podcast episode 5 - Undefinable Me featuring Marcia Riefer Johnston

Content Content podcast episode 5 - Undefinable Me featuring Marcia Riefer Johnston | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Tech writer turned content marketer and strategist Marcia Riefer Johnston (@marciarjohnston) discusses her career transitions, her two highly rated books, and her strong love of Strunk and White. A...
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Ed Marsh of ContentContent has posted another podcast--and it's with Marcia Riefer Johnston! Two of my favorite people having a conversation, and I get to listen in! Brilliant! 

 

Take a listen...Marcia always has fantastic insights to things. I'm lucky enough to call both Ed and Marcia good friends of mine. :-)

 

Listen, listen! 

--techcommgeekmom

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The English subtitles in the Chinese version of Harry Potter are hilarious (36 Photos)

The English subtitles in the Chinese version of Harry Potter are hilarious (36 Photos) | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

George Takei had posted this through his social media outlets. This is funny, but at the same time, this is a perfect example of how localization and translation can go awry if not done correctly. It took me a while to realize that "melons" probably were "muggles".  Take a look, have a good laugh, and then remember that what you write--or say--can easily be misinterpreted!

--techcommgeekmom  

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MIT claims to have found a “language universal” that ties all languages together

MIT claims to have found a “language universal” that ties all languages together | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
A language universal would bring evidence to Chomsky's controversial theories.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Since I wish I was multilingual, I find this kind of study fascinating (makes me think that I have a lost calling in linguistics). This supports something that I've often thought through studying many languages, but mastering none but my native language (and some question if I've mastered that as well). I think one of the reasons I usually did well in foreign language classes is because I could find common structures to these languages, and that helped me organize how those languages worked. It's helped me in understanding how to use more "standard English" when writing for a non-English audience. 

 

What do you think of this study? Sounds fascinating to me! 

--techcommgeekmom

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steve batchelder's curator insight, August 6, 10:37 AM

Since I wish I was multilingual, I find this kind of study fascinating (makes me think that I have a lost calling in linguistics). This supports something that I've often thought through studying many languages, but mastering none but my native language (and some question if I've mastered that as well). I think one of the reasons I usually did well in foreign language classes is because I could find common structures to these languages, and that helped me organize how those languages worked. It's helped me in understanding how to use more "standard English" when writing for a non-English audience. 

 

What do you think of this study? Sounds fascinating to me! 

--techcommgeekmom

DKW Online's curator insight, August 7, 9:54 AM

Since I wish I was multilingual, I find this kind of study fascinating (makes me think that I have a lost calling in linguistics). This supports something that I've often thought through studying many languages, but mastering none but my native language (and some question if I've mastered that as well). I think one of the reasons I usually did well in foreign language classes is because I could find common structures to these languages, and that helped me organize how those languages worked. It's helped me in understanding how to use more "standard English" when writing for a non-English audience. 

 

What do you think of this study? Sounds fascinating to me! 

--techcommgeekmom

graham j. passmore's curator insight, August 7, 12:18 PM

Since I wish I was multilingual, I find this kind of study fascinating (makes me think that I have a lost calling in linguistics). This supports something that I've often thought through studying many languages, but mastering none but my native language (and some question if I've mastered that as well). I think one of the reasons I usually did well in foreign language classes is because I could find common structures to these languages, and that helped me organize how those languages worked. It's helped me in understanding how to use more "standard English" when writing for a non-English audience. 

 

What do you think of this study? Sounds fascinating to me! 

--techcommgeekmom

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Congratulations to the winner of the Information Development World All-Access Pass!

Congratulations to the winner of the Information Development World All-Access Pass! | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Remember the little contest I ran recently to win a chance at a free All-Access Pass to Information Development World 2015? I didn't forget! A random drawing (not by me, to make it fair) was done o...
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In Music and Content Marketing, It’s All About Creativity: An Interview with Jon Wuebben | The Content Wrangler

In Music and Content Marketing, It’s All About Creativity: An Interview with Jon Wuebben | The Content Wrangler | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

I had a great opportunity to interview Jon Wuebben of Content Launch on behalf of The Content Wrangler. I'm excited to see this interview is up now! Jon and I had a great conversation. Jon's got some great insights about content marketing...and music! Take a look!

--techcommgeekmom


 

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How Rodale Inc. Evolved Its Content Strategy to Become the World’s Largest Health and Wellness Media Company

How Rodale Inc. Evolved Its Content Strategy to Become the World’s Largest Health and Wellness Media Company | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
Discover Rodale Inc.’s five steps to content success and learn how it can help you improve your own strategy – Content Marketing Institute.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

The Content Marketing Institute has posted a REALLY good article on content marketing and content selling here. I like how the author framed Rodale as a prime example of how to do it right. As a Rodale subscriber myself, I could immediately understand the tactics used and how they were used on me! In the end, it's not about selling tricks, but rather concentrating on audience needs and selling to those needs. 

 

A true must-read article both for content strategists and digital marketers. 

--techcommgeekmom

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Oh, the Academian and the Practitioner should be friends...Engaging TechComm Professionals

Oh, the Academian and the Practitioner should be friends...Engaging TechComm Professionals | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
I attended the IEEE ProComm at the University of Limerick, in Limerick, Ireland last week. I was absolutely gobsmacked months ago when a presentation proposal I sent in for this conference was actu...
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2015 IEEE ProComm Presentation: The Future of m-Learning

This past week, I presented a workship at the IEEE ProComm Conference, which was held in Limerick, Ireland. It was a great experience, and different from other conferences I have attended thusfar (...
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People Are Flocking to a Social Network That Redistributes 90% of Ad Revenue to Users

People Are Flocking to a Social Network That Redistributes 90% of Ad Revenue to Users | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
On Tsu, users share any original content from artwork or Soundcloud tracks to selfies or videos of their dogs. The company then redistributes 90 percent of its advertising revenue to users in the f...
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

Thanks to Tina Howe for curating and posting this up on social media channels. This is an interesting social media outlet that I hadn't heard of before.  Does anyone know much about it, other than what's here? Perhaps some additional research is needed, but it sounds great as a viable revenue stream. Hmm....

--techcommgeekmom

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Why Do Americans and Brits Have Different Accents?

Why Do Americans and Brits Have Different Accents? | M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications | Scoop.it
At the time of the American Revolution, Americans and British people spoke the same. It was the British accent that later diverged.
Danielle M. Villegas's insight:

My father often clained that he spoke the "King's English" with his strong South (New) Jersey accent that still makes me cringe now and then. Perhaps he's right!  But this time, he's backed with science! 

 

What do you think? I've often thought that the American accent was softened also by Irish, Scottish and Welsh brogues. When I went to Ireland, I felt that the average Irish person's accent was much closer to my American accent than a British accent (and that was me in the West of Ireland, where the Gaelige brogue is stronger).

 

What do you think?

--techcommgeekmom

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