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NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps

NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

The designers at Control Group--have been hired by New York’s MTA to bring a plan for bringing a networked, touch-screen system to their subways. Starting this year, 90 touch-screen kiosks will make their way to thoroughfares like Grand Central Station and hip stops like Bedford Avenue. Together, they’ll make a beta network for 2 million commuters and tourists a day.

 

Each kiosk is a 47-inch touch screen, encapsulated in stainless steel, with an operational temperature up to 200 degrees. They’ll be placed, mostly in pairs, outside pay areas, inside mezzanines and even right on train platforms. Control Group has skinned the hardware with a simple front end and an analytics-heavy backend. And the platform will even support third-party apps approved by the MTA.

At launch, the screens will feature all sorts of content, like delays, outages, and, of course, ads (which bring in $100 million in revenue for the MTA each year, but mostly in paper signage). Yet its most powerful interaction for many will likely be its map, which features a one-tap navigation system.

You look at the map, you tap your intended destination, and the map will draw your route, including any transfers along the way. It’s an interface that puts Google Maps to shame.


Via Lauren Moss
James's insight:

Touch interface has seen a rise in the community, such as information booths.

It allows for easy usability and quick access for people in a hurry.

While it does give convenience to the people, it's another job that's been mechanized because of its efficiency.

 

Touchscreens do away with the harder input devices and allow people to use it little to no prior knowledge of how to access it.

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luiy's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:23 AM

THE POWER OF EXTRA SENSORS

 

At the same time, the system’s screens could be the least interesting part of this project. The kiosks will be fitted with extra modules--video cameras, mics, and Wi-Fi--to open up a whole secondary layer of data collection and interface.

 

With cameras and mics, the MTA can enable two-way communication (what I imagine as emergency response messaging), and they can also pull in all sorts of automated metrics from their stations--they’d have eyes capable of counting station crowdedness or even approximate user ethnographics.

Meanwhile, Wi-Fi opens the door for networking a whole platform of mobile users with Internet access and other streamed content. Given that the average person waits 5 to 10 minutes on a platform, O’Donnell sees the potential of engaging, sponsored experiences, like a networked game of Jeopardy, while people wait for the train, or streaming media content, like TV/movie clips. A tourist could, of course, do something far more practical, too, like download a city map in moments.

“We can’t provide Internet for everybody,” he says, “but we can allow interactivity on the platform.”

david nguy's curator insight, October 21, 5:53 PM

Sous la ville, de nouvelles technologies et innovations se mettent en place afin de faciliter la diffusion de l'information.

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Army of the Future: Russian combat Robots

The US already has thousands of military robots and unmanned aircraft in Afghanistan. As for the prospect of killer robots stalking the battlefield Russia is...

Via Frederic Emam-Zade Gerardino, Sakis Koukouvis
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Surgical robots: pricey and without clear benefits? | SmartPlanet

Surgical robots: pricey and without clear benefits? | SmartPlanet | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
Multiple lawsuits and federal inquiry have cast a shadow over one of the fastest-growing medical technologies in the U.S..
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NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps

NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

The designers at Control Group--have been hired by New York’s MTA to bring a plan for bringing a networked, touch-screen system to their subways. Starting this year, 90 touch-screen kiosks will make their way to thoroughfares like Grand Central Station and hip stops like Bedford Avenue. Together, they’ll make a beta network for 2 million commuters and tourists a day.

 

Each kiosk is a 47-inch touch screen, encapsulated in stainless steel, with an operational temperature up to 200 degrees. They’ll be placed, mostly in pairs, outside pay areas, inside mezzanines and even right on train platforms. Control Group has skinned the hardware with a simple front end and an analytics-heavy backend. And the platform will even support third-party apps approved by the MTA.

At launch, the screens will feature all sorts of content, like delays, outages, and, of course, ads (which bring in $100 million in revenue for the MTA each year, but mostly in paper signage). Yet its most powerful interaction for many will likely be its map, which features a one-tap navigation system.

You look at the map, you tap your intended destination, and the map will draw your route, including any transfers along the way. It’s an interface that puts Google Maps to shame.


Via Lauren Moss
James's insight:

Touch interface has seen a rise in the community, such as information booths.

It allows for easy usability and quick access for people in a hurry.

While it does give convenience to the people, it's another job that's been mechanized because of its efficiency.

 

Touchscreens do away with the harder input devices and allow people to use it little to no prior knowledge of how to access it.

more...
luiy's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:23 AM

THE POWER OF EXTRA SENSORS

 

At the same time, the system’s screens could be the least interesting part of this project. The kiosks will be fitted with extra modules--video cameras, mics, and Wi-Fi--to open up a whole secondary layer of data collection and interface.

 

With cameras and mics, the MTA can enable two-way communication (what I imagine as emergency response messaging), and they can also pull in all sorts of automated metrics from their stations--they’d have eyes capable of counting station crowdedness or even approximate user ethnographics.

Meanwhile, Wi-Fi opens the door for networking a whole platform of mobile users with Internet access and other streamed content. Given that the average person waits 5 to 10 minutes on a platform, O’Donnell sees the potential of engaging, sponsored experiences, like a networked game of Jeopardy, while people wait for the train, or streaming media content, like TV/movie clips. A tourist could, of course, do something far more practical, too, like download a city map in moments.

“We can’t provide Internet for everybody,” he says, “but we can allow interactivity on the platform.”

david nguy's curator insight, October 21, 5:53 PM

Sous la ville, de nouvelles technologies et innovations se mettent en place afin de faciliter la diffusion de l'information.

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Robohub: The use of robots in warfare

Robohub: The use of robots in warfare | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
For the latter half of this past week, the focus at Robohub.org has been the use of robots in warfare.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
James's insight:

Not particularly helpful nor reliable as a source, very short.

 

In general, military robots are even now proving to be invaluable military assets; doing dangerous jobs that would risk the lives of infantry and specialists.

 

Current development has created remote-controlled robotic soldiers that allows a footsoldier to substitute themself on the field while they control them. This is also in the case of flying drones.

 

Bomb disposal units have also been developed to avoid fatalities should it not be diffused properly or in time.

 

Lastly, robots designed to transport otherwise heavy loads and equipment allows infantry to remain unburdened when mobile on the field.

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Matthew's curator insight, March 20, 2013 8:10 PM
Robotics in warfare is an advanced technology that will become more important in future conflicts.
Braden Costin's curator insight, March 22, 2013 2:29 AM

The article focuses on robots that are used by the military, however this article is only a few sentence long and is therfore not that useful as a source. Robots are now able to take on dangerous situations that ordinary soldiers could not, an example being bomb disposal.

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Medical vital-sign monitoring reduced to the size of a postage stamp

Medical vital-sign monitoring reduced to the size of a postage stamp | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

Electrical engineers at Oregon State University have developed new technology to monitor medical vital signs, with sophisticated sensors so small and cheap they could fit onto a bandage, be manufactured in high volumes and cost less than a quarter. A patent is being processed for the monitoring system and it’s now ready for clinical trials, researchers say. When commercialized, it could be used as a disposable electronic sensor, with many potential applications due to its powerful performance, small size, and low cost.

 

Heart monitoring is one obvious candidate, since the system could gather data on some components of an EKG, such as pulse rate and atrial fibrillation. Its ability to measure EEG brain signals could find use in nursing care for patients with dementia, and recordings of physical activity could improve weight loss programs. Measurements of perspiration and temperature could provide data on infection or disease onset. And of course, if you can measure pulse rate and skin responses, why not a lie detector?

 

“Current technology allows you to measure these body signals using bulky, power-consuming, costly instruments,” said Patrick Chiang, an associate professor in the OSU School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. “What we’ve enabled is the integration of these large components onto a single microchip, achieving significant improvements in power consumption,” Chiang said. “We can now make important biomedical measurements more portable, routine, convenient and affordable than ever before.”

 

The much higher cost and larger size of conventional body data monitoring precludes many possible uses, Chiang said. Compared to other technologies, the new system-on-a-chip cuts the size, weight, power consumption and cost by about 10 times. Some of the existing technologies that would compete with this system, such as pedometers currently in use to measure physical activity, cost $100 or more. The new electronics developed at OSU, by comparison, are about the size and thickness of a postage stamp, and could easily just be taped over the heart or at other body locations to measure vital signs.

 

Part of what enables this small size, Chiang said, is that the system doesn’t have a battery. It harvests the sparse radio-frequency energy from a nearby device – in this case, a cell phone. The small smart phone carried by hundreds of millions of people around the world can now provide the energy for important biomedical monitoring at the same time.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Social Media On Your Phone Is Worse Than Alcohol Consumption #Infographic

Social Media On Your Phone Is Worse Than Alcohol Consumption #Infographic | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

We are all thankful to social sites which has made all of us so interlaced, from finding old school mates to sharing day to day stories it has made us so addicted, more than alcohol and smoking.

Smart-devices have given us a rich experience of social networking they have completely revolutionized the accessibility of social networks. Social media marketers are also push to take internet mobile, Smartphone was the most preferred phone for advertisers in Q3 2012 with 75% campaigns.

And, a recent report in India says that accessing social networking sites is considered to be the main internet activities on mobile devices.

But don’t you agree that we somewhere have hiccups or cut backs in presenting ourselves the way we are and the reason could be our friends circle itself. Did you ever know this can even cause a negative effect on our psyches?

 

An infographic from Ligo Electronics says that 66% of respondents have trouble sleeping after using social networking sites.



Read more: http://www.dazeinfo.com/2013/03/14/social-media-on-your-phone-is-worse-than-alcohol-consumption-infographic/#ixzz2NXMl9atg


Via Berend de Jonge, John van den Brink, Philippe Trebaul
James's insight:

Some interesting fact and stats about the effects of social media.

Could just be assumptions and made up if not for the references, worth investigating further for more accuracy.

 

Social media was a big step in extroversion and news, however it was a plummet in personal privacy. The integration of social media into everything is convenient, yes, but it leads one to believe using it to be mandatory to have because of all the disadvantages compared to using it.

 

Aside from privacy, the addiction to social media is extremely evident in the younger generation and often leads to online arguments, befriending complete strangers or even identity frauds.

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Mercor's curator insight, March 14, 2013 3:08 PM

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Infographic: What Role Will Mobile Play in The Future of Higher Learning | Mobile Marketing Watch

Infographic: What Role Will Mobile Play in The Future of Higher Learning | Mobile Marketing Watch | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

A new infographic based on New Media Consoritum’s 12 emerging technologies to watch highlights how mobile technologies will impact the future of higher learning.

 

From smartphones to smart wearable devices, there’s a wide assortment of gadgets and corresponding features that may change how we learn in the coming years.

 

So what are the 12 technologies to look out for? Check out the new infographic below, courtesy of OnlineDegrees.org.


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D., massimo facchinetti
James's insight:

Convenient and moneysaving, but can it really replace what has worked for years?

The digital generation can benefit from its familiarity but the increase in tech also leads to disuse of important skills such as handwriting and otherwise independent thinking and problemsolving.

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Nat Sones's curator insight, March 21, 2013 8:57 AM

Higher education can't fight smartphones in the classroom any more. If you can't beat them, join them, say educators. 

Nat Sones's comment, March 21, 2013 8:58 AM
You have to use the tools of today. Does that mean you become slaves to them? Of course not. But minds are changing, just as times are. We must educate people in any way we can - and if that means (judicious) use of mobile, then so be it...at least, to me..
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CES 2013: Hands-On with the Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Headset

We put on the Oculus Rift VR goggles and conduct an in-depth interview about its head-tracking technology and the future of virtual reality. This is one of t...
James's insight:

An interesting take on the past attempts at personal VR tech.

Where others failed in selling a device such as this, perhaps the technology of today can make for an acceptable immersion in the videogame industry.

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Wearable computing: How technology will soon be stitched into our lives - GeekWire

Wearable computing: How technology will soon be stitched into our lives - GeekWire | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
Ah, wearable computing. Whether it's geeky wristbands you can wear in the shower or the Seattle bar that's already banned Google Glass, the discussions and ideas for embedded electronics on our body are just starting to heat up.
James's insight:

Hardly informative beyond a story to entertain, very shallow article.

To be expected from a blog.

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Gartner: 10 critical IT trends for the next five years

Gartner: 10 critical IT trends for the next five years | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
Software-defined networks, data explosions, hybrid clouds will test IT prowess
James's insight:

Somewhat detailed, suboptimal navigation.

Focuses mainly on specificly IT related trends such as networks and data.

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The "Big Five" IT trends of the next half decade: Mobile, social, cloud, consumerization, and big data | ZDNet

The "Big Five" IT trends of the next half decade: Mobile, social, cloud, consumerization, and big data | ZDNet | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
In today's ever more technology-centric world, the stodgy IT department isn't considered the home of innovation and business leadership.
James's insight:

Smart Phones, Social Media, Data and Consumerism are main focuses.

 

Quite detailed but the article is focused on business aspect.

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Defense Department to further militarize U.S. law enforcement with hundreds of military robots

Defense Department to further militarize U.S. law enforcement with hundreds of military robots | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

According to the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), law enforcement will be even further militarized through the use of hundreds of military robots acquired by the Department of Defense over the past decade.

James's insight:

A somewhat biased article, and unreliable as a source because of the website itself.

 

Again, military robots allow soldiers to replace themselves in the field and do dangerous jobs.

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Haptic technology: the sensitivity of surgical robots

Haptic technology: the sensitivity of surgical robots | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

Haptic technology is breaking new and promising ground in the field of surgical robots. Learn more about haptics and how it is changing the idea of senses.


Via Luca Baptista
James's insight:

Surgical robots have the potential to be more accurate and precise than the dexterity of a human, however it is limited only to what the machine is capable of. It would also require precise calibration if its to perform surgery on humans.

 

If this were to be developed further than it could allow trained professionals to do jobs remotely or possibly even have the machine entirely automated.

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Hayden Theuerkauf's curator insight, March 20, 2013 4:47 AM

This article offers information about haptic technology and how it will change people jobs. There are alot of people who currently work with robots, but the disadvantage of this is that, robots cannot feel, however haptic technology is the future and very soon robots will have to ability to feel drastically changing and revolutionizing the areas that need this.

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Experts endorse virtual reality for PTSD treatment - Healio

Experts endorse virtual reality for PTSD treatment - Healio | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
Healio
Experts endorse virtual reality for PTSD treatment
Healio
Some leading experts on posttraumatic stress disorder are advocating the use of virtual reality as an effective treatment option for the disorder.
James's insight:

A more practical use of VR technology outside of videogames, simulations that allow people to experience real situations without the fear of physical danger.

 

In this case, it allows those who suffer from PTSD to gradually come to terms with their disorder and return to a regular life. Combined with the simulation and professional on-hand to talk them through it while they experience it, greatly improves the treatment.

 

If things continue like this, VR has the potentential to find use in other areas.

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Groundbreaking Virtual Robotics Allow Us Our Very Own Robot Avatar

Groundbreaking Virtual Robotics Allow Us Our Very Own Robot Avatar | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

A research group lead by Professor Tachi at Keio University in Japan is currently working on one of the first incarnations of an avatar that incorporates some pretty cool virtual robotics technology. By slipping on a pair of virtual reality gloves and a helmet, you would be able to control and see the world through your avatar’s eyes. The concept behind this virtual robotics technology is really called Telexistence, and it allows us to control a real avatar robot.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
James's insight:

A step up from remote controlled robots doing dangerous jobs, saving potential lives. This could allow for more dextrous and accurate controls without the remote-control middleman and instead with direct input.

 

If these were to make it into society then it could vastly change the structure of things, with work being done without even leaving the home.

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Hayden Theuerkauf's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:56 PM

This particular website gives information on the creation of avatar/robots that humans will be able to control. This will change the future, technology will allow humans to create there own avatar in the form of a robot, allowing humans to stay home whilst there avatar/robot goes out to do there daily needs or to even do there jobs at a single touch of a button, this technology will vastly change how the world works and runs.

cassian bulger's curator insight, March 22, 2013 5:38 AM

Technology such as this which provides an avatar that can be operated remotely has infinite potential to make the lives of countless people easyer such robots provide an "out of body" experience and when perfected can enable working remotly and remotly carrying out daily chores. With strides like this technology is taking remarkable strides into how we are shaping our future. 

Mercor's curator insight, March 22, 2013 7:03 AM

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[INFOGRAPHIC] The Automated Home of Tomorrow: How Vulnerable is it | Trend Micro Security Intelligence Blog

[INFOGRAPHIC] The Automated Home of Tomorrow: How Vulnerable is it | Trend Micro Security Intelligence Blog | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
In this entry, we tackle various potential security risks posed by Internet-enabled devices such as smart TVs, refrigerators, and cars among others.

Via Red-DragonRising
James's insight:

An entirely automated and digital life is not necessarily the best one.

Security breaches can lead to safety concerns and electronic failure can be more complicated for an everyman to repair compared to a non-digitalized appliance.

 

Perhaps we're not too far from having a HAL on our hands...

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Mobile Devices Linked to Better Health

Mobile Devices Linked to Better Health | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it

More than 6 billion people worldwide (including almost 400 million in the United States) now carry mobile phones, which could be used to enhance mental and physical health, aCornell researcher proposed. Phones can give owners important information about their environment, offer advice and reminders to encourage healthy behavior and supply mountains of data to researchers, said Deborah Estrin, professor of computer science at Cornell NYC Tech in New York City. Estrin outlined her vision for "mobile health" in the presentation "Transforming Health Care Through Mobile Platforms," part of the symposium Smart Phones, Smart Devices, Social Networks, and Smart Health Care, at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston. The symposium, chaired by Google vice president Vinton Cerf, explored how emerging "net-centric societies" will transform the health care landscape. "We can leverage the power and ubiquity of mobile and cloud technologies to assist individuals, clinicians and researchers in monitoring and managing symptoms, side effects and treatment outside the clinical setting; and to address the lifestyle factors that can bring on or exacerbate health conditions," Estrin said. Health-enhancing applications of mobile devices might include diet and exercise tracking, medication reminders, monitoring of social and environmental stress and the formation of online support groups. As examples, Estrin cites PTSD Coach, developed by the Department of Defense and the Veteran's Administration to help veterans cope with post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms; mobile reporting from a diabetic's glucose meter; and the Fitbit wireless activity tracker.


Via nrip
James's insight:

Medicine grows alongside technology as it allows for things not before possible. In this case, smartphones and devices could allow professionals to access libraries of information easily and on the go.

 

In the next decade, perhaps more mobile medical devices may be developed to do analysis outside the med-centre or even for citizens to get an accurate diagnosis from their homes.

 

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Orwellian Google augmented reality glasses - Signs of the Times

Orwellian Google augmented reality glasses - Signs of the Times | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
Google glasses will make us all agents for Google. Nick Pickles, Director of Big Brother Watch, says the implications for privacy are profoundly worrying. In the online world - for now, at least - it's the advertisers that make the ...

Via Pekka Puhakka
James's insight:

The first step to cybernetics it seems.

 

Raises concerns about privacy, even moreso in such a company as Google. GPS tracking, photographic data, online roaming data and many others gives access to information about users and possibly non-purchasers as bystanders are recorded with the gadget.

 

This particular article is lacking but focuses on the disadvatages of such a device.

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Wearable Sensor-monitoring Technology Could Change Preventative Medicine Forever - Techvibes.com

Wearable Sensor-monitoring Technology Could Change Preventative Medicine Forever - Techvibes.com | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
Toronto-based InteraXon CEO, Ariel Garten, took the Engadget Expand stage recently wearing a baby blue headband and as she sat (RT @techvibes: Wearable Sensor-monitoring Technology Could Change Preventative Medicine Forever
James's insight:

Useful in theory, however it adds to the dwindling privacy left in current times.

Data collected could be used without user knowledge in unimaginable ways.

 

Overall, article is short and hardly detailed.

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Ten emerging technology trends to watch over the next decade

Ten emerging technology trends to watch over the next decade | Tech trends in IT | Scoop.it
Ten years ago at the close of the 20th century, people the world over were obsessing about the millennium bug - an unanticipated glitch arising from an earlier technology.  I wonder how clear it was then that, despite this storm in what turned out...
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Gartner Identifies the Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2013

Gartner, Inc. today highlighted the top 10 technologies and trends that will be strategic for most organizations in 2013. Analysts presented their findings during Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, being held here through October 25.
James's insight:

Mobile devices and Data Storage are main focus, somewhat detailed.

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