Tech Pedagogy
Follow
Find
6.4K views | +0 today
Tech Pedagogy
This topic is about using technology with purpose in the classroom
Curated by Terry Elliott
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

How To Train Your Robot

How To Train Your Robot | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

I tend to think that pRogramming is one of the "R's".  This is such a delicously analog way into programming.  Fun, have awesome fun with it.  Then figure out how to cross the analog/digital boundary with some other skill.  For example, I have seen teachers use 'paper blogs' to get students prepared for digital ones. Twitter=student notes in secret in class, Facebook=a bulletin board with 'pages',  texts=envelopes pinned on a board.  Let's all play.

 

 

 

 

Last Sunday, I taught six kids of ages 5 to 7 how to program. “In what programming language?” you may ask. Well…I didn’t use a programming language, at least none that you know of. In fact, I...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

8 Ways Google Glasses Will Change Education

8 Ways Google Glasses Will Change Education | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

What might Google Glasses do for the classroom?  This article does a decent job of priming the pump for your imagination.  Put yourself in a place where students all have these, a 1-to-1 Glasses initiative?  

 

1.  Attention--who gets it and how is it kept?

 

2. Is this the death of locally directed curriculum? 

 

3.  We ain't seen disruptive yet until we see a classroom full of these. In fact there won't be any classrooms in the currently accepted sense. Nor teachers, nor students, nor principles.

 

4.  Whither memorization? No.  These glasses might make it even easier. 

 

5.  What happens when we put these things into contact lenses or corneal implants?

 

6.  The advent of the babelfish? 

 

Have at it and tinker in your mind. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

AudioNote Syncs Your Typed Notes with Recorded Audio

AudioNote Syncs Your Typed Notes with Recorded Audio | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

I haven't figured out how to best use this text-speech sync'd app, but... it does resonate.  Any ideas?

 

 

 

"Windows/OS X/iOS/Android: AudioNote is a simple notepad app designed to take notes during meetings and lectures. On top of tracking when things happened by time, it also records audio and syncs every word you type along with it."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Facebook groups can now add Dropbox files - Pocket-lint

Facebook groups can now add Dropbox files - Pocket-lint | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Terry says: One step closer to Facebook as a complete, personal, closed content management system.  Sharing files/collaborating will be as simple as creating a page and Bob's yer uncle. 

 

"Facebook users will soon be able to add their Dropbox files to their groups from within the social network."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

This Curation Trend has One Big Problem: Scale

This Curation Trend has One Big Problem: Scale | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

The title to Erin Griffith's Pandodaily article on curation speaks more largely than it realizes.  Why? Because the scale problem in curation is much the same as the scaling problem in MOOCs.  How do you assess what folks know when there are 100,000 of them?  In MOOC's that has been answered two ways:  roboassessment and peer assessment.

 

Nothing else scales.  But it appears that curators are finding a way with with what amounts to curatorial boards, groups of experts who work their way in, around, and among the participants like Wikipedia angels amongst the trolls.  I think we would do well to see how curators thrash through this problem.  Maybe we can get some ideas from them.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from The 21st Century
Scoop.it!

20 Ways to Use Edmodo

20 Ways to Use Edmodo...

 

Are learning management systems going the way of the Web 2.0 tools?  I often opt for the philosophy of 'small tools loosely joined' when I work with students. I have to be careful that I don't give them too many digital places to go, too many usernames and passwords, too many learning curves.  After all it is not the tools that are primar, but the affordances they offer and the adjacent and unexpected possibles that open up as they use these tools to research, write and share.

 

So that's the long way around the barn to say:  perhaps Edmodo is a useful tool still because it does so much.  It reminds me of Diigo.  Perhaps as teachers who use tech in our teaching we should measure the cognitive weight of the tools we ask our students to use with an eye toward getting good 'weight'. 

 


Via Susan Bainbridge
more...
AnnaB's curator insight, July 9, 2013 6:06 AM

add your insight...

 

 
carldowse's curator insight, July 10, 2013 7:11 AM

Edmodo provides a simple to set-up, easy to use virtual learning environment which is especially suited to smaller groups. It's a hosted service (unlike Moodle) and works quite well on mobile devices. If you're thinking of offering a blended learning package to your learners then it's a good place to start.

Anne-Mart Olsen's curator insight, July 10, 2013 7:12 AM

I found that edmodo was particularly useful, as student easily identified with the platform.

Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Which Crowdfunding Platform Should You Choose For Campaigns In Education?

Which Crowdfunding Platform Should You Choose For Campaigns In Education? | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Kirsten Winkler compares the top three crowdfunding platforms Kickstarter, Indiegogo and gofundme and explains which one to use for your fundraiser."

 

Yes, let us use technology to fund pedagogy. 

 

NGO's are always looking for operating money for projects.  Perhaps teachers are beginning to take a page for their book and beginning to crowdfund.  For example, the National Writing Project was cut by about half in its funding last year.  Might this be an appropriate way for its many satellite Writing Projects to fund themselve better? 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from TeacherWorkflow
Scoop.it!

Hackpad in Education

Hackpad in Education | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Etherpad meets wiki.  Yeah, that really works.  I have been using it to share initial impressions, questions, and requests from the folks at Vialogue.  Here is the link to that if you want to see a hackpad in use:  https://hackpad.com/THIQHze4Mwg#Vialogues

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

The TPACK Game – T | Dr Matthew J. Koehler

The TPACK Game – T | Dr Matthew J. Koehler | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
  Given a random content area to teach, and pedagogical approach, figure out a technology and an activity to combine...

 

Matthew Koehler has come up with a unique way to discuss how content, tech, and pedagogy are always connected.  To play the game just write in the comment area below on what tech you would use in conjunction with this content (reading comprehension) and this pedagogy (collaboration).  To my mind the obvious fill in the blank is to use twitter.  Activity?  Write a tweet that sums up the first paragraph of an article in the New York Times making sure to use the designated class hashtag. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from CurationEd
Scoop.it!

30+ Cool Content Curation Tools for Personal & Professional Use

30+ Cool Content Curation Tools for Personal & Professional Use | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
As the web becomes more and more inundated with blogs, videos, tweets, status updates, news, articles, and countless other forms of content, "information over...
more...
KevinHodgson's comment, July 29, 2012 6:21 AM
Who knew there were so many options? (I guess I should have known). Maybe part of curation is figuring out your own style of gathering and processing information, and then choosing a tool to fit your needs.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Curation Platforms | Comparison tables - SocialCompare

Curation Platforms | Comparison tables - SocialCompare | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

This is a cool matrix that compares various curation platforms.  Even more interestingly the matrix was created using an online tool called SocialCompare,  what they call a collaborative comparison engine.  You can create your own matrices collaboratively (co-curating a table if you will).  Now that is new wrinkle for me. 

 

I can see this as a year long, ongoing class activity.  Students add to it as a chart that aggregates all  of the "new ideas" and tools and skills that are introduced.  Or perhaps it can be a weekly activity that is returned to at the beginning of the next week as a moment of reflection.  I can see it being student generated and curated in some way either on the chart with comments or together as a group through conversation. 

 

This is darned useful--both the chart and the tool that it rode in on.

more...
Shaz J's comment, July 29, 2012 2:24 AM
Yes, that is what I meant thank you. So it still remains used for very current and up-to-date material, as opposed to an archive.

I'm just kind of thinking through how this would work in my case.

If you don't mind, I'd be curious to hear how it goes.
Terry Elliott's comment, July 29, 2012 7:10 AM
Glad to keep you in the loop. Hope you don't mind fail tales and interesting side trips.
Shaz J's comment, July 30, 2012 4:28 AM
Not at all!
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

New Feature Log | Prezi Learn Center

Big new release of Prezi that merits a good look especially if you or your students use them for presentations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

From academic blog to academic job: using Scoop.it to showcase your work online shows others the value of digital communication skills | Impact of Social Sciences

From academic blog to academic job: using Scoop.it to showcase your work online shows others the value of digital communication skills | Impact of Social Sciences | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

A practical application of curation tool as portfolio for academics and educators. 

more...
Shaz J's comment, July 25, 2012 8:37 AM
Good example of putting a tool to your own uses. Thanks.
Terry Elliott's comment, July 25, 2012 11:03 AM
Portfolio as curation?
Shaz J's comment, July 25, 2012 11:40 AM
Sure, but a very specific type. And rather limited in source material.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

CourseBuilderChecklist - course-builder - Checklist of all steps to create a course using Course Builder. - Course Builder - Google Project Hosting

CourseBuilderChecklist - course-builder - Checklist of all steps to create a course using Course Builder. - Course Builder - Google Project Hosting | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

A Tool for Reviewing Tables of Information - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education

A Tool for Reviewing Tables of Information - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Make your own interactive tables to help you memorize.  I love these super-focused posts on ProfHacker that just zero in on someone's pet project that just so happens to be very useful to others.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

10 Fun Tools To Easily Make Your Own Infographics

10 Fun Tools To Easily Make Your Own Infographics | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

I want to make my own infographics surely I can find something in here to help me.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

New e-book export feature enabled on Wikipedia — Wikimedia blog

New e-book export feature enabled on Wikipedia — Wikimedia blog | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Create your own epub using Wikipedia.  I don't even know where to begin here, but you can create your own one here: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:Book&bookcmd=book_creator&referer=Main+Page

 

Here is an epub that took me five minutes to create: https://www.dropbox.com/s/qycbpvs561ctunv/Endless%20Doors%20All%20the%20Way%20Down%20copy.epub

 

What skills and levels of thought are needed to created useful epubs?  I think that this is worth doing as a useful exercise in searching, outlining, organizing, and synthesizing.  I wonder if Wikipedia has made this tool an open one so that other wikis can adapt and adopt it?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

GameDesk Opens New Game-Based School

GameDesk Opens New Game-Based School | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Some high rollers, a lot of money, permission to experiment on students, a charter school rubric--has anyone even considered how sustainable such a plan is? 

 

I think what is really going on here is the birth of a new model for schools that fits connective, networked students alongside a teacher  who represents a new breed--"questioner, facilitator and reflective agent."  I can only guess what a reflective agent is, but I think I try to be both a questioner and facilitator in my changing role of teacher as learning concierge.

 

But I have to ask again, where is Plan B for the rest of us.  And where is the continuous training and reflection that is needed to become the teacher they describe?  I think this is a trojan horse to use public education as a tool of larger forces.  Wouldn't Bill Gates just love a system that churned out lots of workers who were very narrowly capable of jumping right into the new corporate assembly line?  What makes this any different than the industrial model we have pursued over the last century?

 

And they cloak themselves with all the right cloth--Common Core, STEM, "classroom of the future", and charter school-dom.  All I can ask is that you follow the money like Andrew Miller in this article and ask yourself, "What do Bill Gates, AT&T, and Lucien Vattel  (executive director of Game Desk) really want?  What have they always wanted?"

 

 

 

 

GameDesk By Andrew Miller GameDesk, an organization that's developing a variety of game-based learning initiatives, is venturing into new terrain wi...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

SoundGecko

SoundGecko | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

According to SoundGecko you can "listen to any article, on the go, anywhere."  For early days that is pretty much true. After you have signed up for an account this tool allows you to convert almost any  website into speech.  You copy the url and send that address in an  email to go@soundgecko.com.  They convert it using some sort of wizardry that gets rids if ads and others unneeded etcetera into an mp3 which you can listen to on their site or in their iphone/ipod app.

 

Yes, it does work.  In the app you can speed up or slow down the 'robot' voice. (I liked it slowed down myself).  You can replay the last ten seconds or go forward 30.  Your recordings go into a personal playlist or you can check out their popular ones.  One especially nice perquisite is the automatically generated iTunes feed. Of course I can see many uses for that feed especially for visually impaired students, but I can imagine many uses for students who want to be heard as well as seen.  The iTunes playlist becomes a handy table of contents for audio anthologies of student written work.  Just having this tool available and almost frictionless will inspire many more uses.

 

I am planning on using it on my hour long, twice daily commute.  I like the computer voice just fine and most blog posts I am gathering are less than ten minutes long.  What I find interesting is that any blogger can now authomatically become a podcaster.  Any student can publish his or her paper on a blog and have the immediate benefit of having a digital classmate read it aloud.  I advise my students to read their papers aloud to catch problems they might not otherwise find if they read it silently.

 

Android and Windows apps are on the way.  It has a Chrome extension that I have not tried yet, but I will report back. 

 

Extra:  here is the soundgecko mp3 for the text above:  http://soundgecko.com/play/ftkIyjl6r0iy-rtFcjADCA63ou2AoH/soundgecko-text-to-all.mp3

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from TeacherWorkflow
Scoop.it!

BalancEdTech - iPad Exploration

A highly useful wiki outline for anyone to learn how to use an iPad in the classroom.  This makes me realize how many learning doors the iPad opens for learners of all stripes.  If you follow their outine then at the end and probably working with a partner you will know navigate as well as download apps.  You will explore ebooks and their creation. And as the infomercials shout, "Much,much more."

 

I like that you have basic stuff and 'extra challenges' very similar to the recent Google Search MOOC.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

6 powerful strategies for paradigm-shifting teacher PD | Connected Principals

6 powerful strategies for paradigm-shifting teacher PD | Connected Principals | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

What's good for the principal is good for all!  Here are six institutional innovations that could be adopted at every level of stakeholder involvement in a school.  Open Spaces and pechakucha are both valuable technological processes in the classroom and outside of it as well.  Gr8 article.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

TechChange – Facilitating Social Change With Innovate Uses of Education Technology | Emerging Education Technology

TechChange – Facilitating Social Change With Innovate Uses of Education Technology | Emerging Education Technology | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
TechChange is the The Institute for Technology and Social Change, and they are at the forefront of combining technology and education to enable social change...

 

Terry writes:  this is an evocative interview with TechChange President and CEO Nick Martin.  It evokes a different POV on tech pedagogy.  The  most interesting quote comes near the end when Martin makes two recommendations to online educators:

 

"1. Content is important, but not as important as direct access to the right educators. If students want to know something, they can look it up pretty easily in forums or elsewhere. Less important than having one omniscient professor is having a network of experts that students can contact and exchange with directly.

2. Online education is very different — forget everything you know and start anew. Some skills for teaching are transferable, but not all. I think what we’re seeing right now is that online education is considered an IMPROVEMENT in education — making it more scalable/interactive, but we haven’t seen teaching doctrine/pedagogy shift to treat it as it should — a REVOLUTION in education that requires a whole new approach."

 

The rest of the article is full of interesting asides into the problems and solutions that NGO's like TechChange are addressing as they the appropriate use of technology to bring about social change.  Well worth the read  about topics like Ushahidi,  low-bandwidth/mobile technologies, the use of small pieces of technology loosely joined, gaming mechanis in course delivery, and so on.  Lots of good sardines packed in this tin.  And mustard sauce, too!  \o/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from CurationEd
Scoop.it!

backchan.nl -- open source to involve the audience

backchan.nl -- open source to involve the audience | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

The MIT Media Lab has developed an open source backchannel that would be ideal for the classroom for learners who are for whatever reason unwilling to raise their hands and their voices.  It is interesting how Universities are increasingly putting out the best new and useful tech tools--Vialogues being the first one that comes to mind. 

 

This tool is easy to set up.  You can ask questions, make comments, add links or vote up or vote down a comment. This is an area I am going to integrate into my F2F classes this fall. Anybody have any ideas how to use these backchannels in an only course?  With a Google Hangout?

more...
Shaz J's comment, July 31, 2012 9:11 AM
Hi Shona. At the moment I'm teaching English to primary school teachers, with no fancy technology inside the classroom. Each class is around 15 students.
I find these backchannel tools really interesting, though they are more defined to a lecture context. In Stannard's TTV about Today's Meet I quite liked his idea of groupwork class feedback, but your reservations about connectivity are echoed in my case.
Have you used these tools in your context?
Shona Whyte's comment, July 31, 2012 3:15 PM
Hi Shaz, I agree the backchannel is more suited to older learners and bigger groups. I haven't tried any yet, but am planning to have a go with Mentimeter à la rentrée, since my students mostly have smartphones.
Shaz J's comment, July 31, 2012 3:20 PM
Well, if you have a moment in a few months to report back with some feedback on your experiences or any thoughts, that would be great. Best of luck with it!
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Aggregation and curation: two concepts that explain a lot about digital change - The Shatzkin Files

Aggregation and curation: two concepts that explain a lot about digital change - The Shatzkin Files | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Shatzkin always has an interesting take on media and this post is no different.  He writes here about 'aggregation and curation' in both the physical and the digital worlds.  Two fascinating terms make this worth a close read:  'units of appreciation' and horizontal vs vertical aggregation.  He makes the connection between aggregation and curation as well.  One cannot have one without the other.  

 

Applied to education?  What exactly is the unit of appreciation for a captive 'market' like k-University?  Their attention? And how can we vertically integrate for our students in the classroom?  Give them more control?  Curating content for the classroom, be it online or F2F, is not horizontal any more (no longer about covering the material) even though much of high stakes testing still thinks it is.  Curation needs to become vertical and focused on the learning needs of our students-customized.  Yes, we still have bricks and mortar places where stuff (read courses, libraries, human resources) are aggregated, but increasingly we have digital spaces as well (courses, libraries, human resources) that compete for market share.

 

By way of experiment, I am including a shared Evernote page with some of these scoops.  What I am doing there is using Diigo to highlight and annotate the most significant parts of the article and then sharing those annotations via a shared Evernote link.

 

EVERNOTE LINK:  http://tinyurl.com/crppdkn

 



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

QS Primer: Spaced Repetition and Learning | Quantified Self

QS Primer: Spaced Repetition and Learning | Quantified Self | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Tech pedagogues should always be looking for digital and mobile versions of analog tools.  Space Repetition is an old memory technology that has been updated here and other places, but the tools are available now. This is a great place to start.  The comments even include a link to a review of the literature of space repetition.

I know that I will be using these every day in my classes this coming year both online and F2F.  I have a monthlong project for being competent in their use and for adapting them for my classrooms and online spaces.

I will let you know how it goes.

more...
No comment yet.