Tech Pedagogy
Follow
Find
6.4K views | +0 today
Scooped by Terry Elliott
onto Tech Pedagogy
Scoop.it!

Moving Into a Learning Niche

Moving Into a Learning Niche | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"When you find something you want to view later, put it in Pocket."  That is the former ReadItLater's new motto.  More and more we are seeing these all-in-one systems that are hardware and software agnostic.  Evernote and Dropbox spring to mind in my own personal use.  Pocket is another.  I have used this app before, but now I am ready to give it a second look especially since I am working to bring my iPad into my teaching workflow.  

 

With the advent of sites like IFTTT it is possible to tie all of your digital life together, but it is also true that adding new niches like this can be disruptive, too.  For example, when and how will I review all the gathered pieces that this app brings in?  Will some of it happen on the fly and others later?  I have had similar issues with Diigo that I have settled by using that tool for very specific purposes, for example annotation, shared lists, group lists, and presentation.  Will the same be true of Pocket?  Will I use it for specific projects?  Will I have a specific time daily for review?  Will I keep everything, archive, or dump after looking.

 

One thing is very certain--I won't be able to figure it out without trying it religiously for a couple of weeks.  I will keep you posted on this little experiment and sample of one.

 

Here is where I have Pocket installed:

 

Desktop Mac

Desktop PC

iPad

iPod

Android phone

Firefox

Chrome

IFTTT

       Pocket read/archived PDF's---> Dropbox

       Pocket read items--> Buffer

       Google Reader starred items--> Pocket

       YouTube vid marked watch later--> Pocket

       RSS feed (Cool Tools) --> Pocket

       FavTweet--> Pocket

       Pocket--> Instapaper (Kindle reading)

       NateSilver's 538 blog--> Pocket

 

 

 

Release the hounds, Smithers! And let the iPad be Mission Control.

more...
No comment yet.
Tech Pedagogy
This topic is about using technology with purpose in the classroom
Curated by Terry Elliott
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Goodbye university? Revolution vs. evolution of the current education model - ICEF Monitor - Market intelligence for international student recruitment

Terry Elliott's insight:

MOOC future analysis.  Hmmm.  Lots of good here.  Good categorization of issues and possible futures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Announcing: Curated Newsletters and MailChimp Integration | Scoop.it Blog

Announcing: Curated Newsletters and MailChimp Integration | Scoop.it Blog | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
more...
Paula Silva's comment, March 4, 7:25 AM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Ebook Glue | Turn your blog into a downloadable ebook.

Give your content a new reading experiece. Ebook Glue lets you quickly publish your writing as a downloadable ebook for Kindle, Nook, Kobo, Android, iOS, Sony, and other readers.
Terry Elliott's insight:

If you think of your blog as a portfolio, then Ebook Glue is your way of publishing your RSS feed as an ebook in various formats.  Could this become a regular part of every online CV/resume?  Maybe a cheap substitute for proprietary educational portfolio systems? I do like this and I like especially that it is a one-person shop from start to finish. 

more...
Alina Ghimpu-Hague's curator insight, February 4, 2013 12:23 PM

I have not tried it yet, but it does sound interesting.

Rescooped by Terry Elliott from Curating Learning Resources
Scoop.it!

Twitter as a Curation Tool

Twitter as a Curation Tool | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Excellent post from Langwitches! She addresses the progression of moving from collector to curator, quoting Mike Fisher, who observed, "Curating is different. It’s the Critical Thinker’s collection, and involves several nuances that separate it as an independent and classroom-worthy task." Sylvia writes: "There are different sides to Twitter as a Curation tool: Taking advantage of a network of curators working for you (building your own customized network), consuming their curated information Collecting, organizing, connecting, attributing, interpreting, summarizing the vast amount of information that comes across your desk/ feed /books/articles/etc. for YOURSELF! Becoming consciously the curator for others for a particular niche, area of expertise or interest. Disseminate resources, add value, put in perspective, create connections, present in a different light/media/language. Real time curation allows you to be part of an event, that you physically might not be attending or being on the opposite end allows you to be the bridge for others to participate at an event where you are present, but your network is not."


Via Nancy White
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Intrusive Scaffolding, Obstructed Learning (and MOOCs)

Intrusive Scaffolding, Obstructed Learning (and MOOCs) | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
My five-year-old son recently learned how to ride a bike. He mastered the essential components of cycling—balance, peddling, and steering—in roughly ten minutes. Without using training wheels, ever...
Terry Elliott's insight:

Mark Sample writes in this post about what he calls 'intrusive, obstructive scaffolding".

 

     "Training wheels are a kind of scaffolding. But they are intrusive        scaffolding,      obstructive scaffolding. These bulky metal add-ons get in the way quite            literally, but they also interfere pedagogically. Riding a bike with training            wheels prepares a child for nothing more than riding a bike—with training        wheels."

 

How does this apply to tech pedagogy?  When I teach new tech tools in the classroom I introduce the broad outlines then I ask them to begin the job at hand.  If they have problems they turn to the student on the right and ask them if can help.  If they can't help then I ask them to turn to the right.  If she can't help, then they can ask me.  I then ask everyone, "Hey can you help with  this?"  If no one knows, then I show the person who originally asked and appoint that student to be the new go to person for that that question.  Yes.  Always?  Not always, but it works well enough that it has become a learning routine in my classes.

 

I think this is what Sample means.  In the context of MOOC's he argues that the whole course is scaffolding on a massive scale and he ask the legitimate question, "Where the hell are the people?" 

 

And what is the danger if we don't bring back the people?

 

     "I want to suggest that unless online teaching—and classroom teaching as        well—begins to first, unscaffold learning problems and second, rediscover        embodied pedagogy, we will obstruct learning rather than foster it. We              will push students away from authentic learning experiences rather than          draw them toward such experiences."

 

Amen.  What do you think?  Respond below.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

The History 2.0 Classroom: Student Portfolios X iPads

The History 2.0 Classroom: Student Portfolios X iPads | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Terry Elliott's insight:

Three different clouds for managing portfolio workflow--Google Drive, Evernote, and Book Creator.  I might add one more to this--Wordpress + the Anthologize plug-in. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from Digital Presentations in Education
Scoop.it!

Dokeos MIND - free mindmapping software

Dokeos MIND - free mindmapping software | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Want to explore this further especially as it relates to their larger suite of software.  Any one out there used the DOKEOS suite of tools?


Via Baiba Svenca
more...
Louis Levy's curator insight, February 13, 2013 5:04 AM
Je ne l'ai pas testé. A voir.
pbernardon's curator insight, February 14, 2013 1:24 AM

Excellente initiative pour les apprenants 

Jean-Pierre THELEN's comment, February 14, 2013 9:29 AM
En fait, juste une version customisée de Xmind :-(
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Patience is a network effect

Patience is a network effect | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
If you want to see how technology shapes the way we perceive the world, just look at the way our experience of time has changed as network speeds have increased. Back in 2006, a famous study of onl...

 

This might as well be a whack upside the head for teachers.  As our students become more connected (meaning fast connections) the less patient they become online-- as in"less that the blink of an eye" wait time impatient.  If this translates to the analog, 'meatspace' world (and I suspect it might), then what does it mean for gathering attention in the classroom?

 

We need to be studying student attention in the classroom where there is unrestricted wireless and device access like my own university one.

 

Here is Nicholas Carr's take (and it honestly makes me think that everything I do in my teaching is wrong:

 

"One thing this study doesn’t tell us — but I would hypothesize as true (based on what I see in myself as well as others) — is that the loss of patience persists even when we’re not online. In other words, digital technologies are training us to be more conscious of and more resistant to delays of all sorts — and perhaps more intolerant of moments of time that pass without the arrival of new stimuli. Because our experience of time is so important to our experience of life, it strikes me that these kinds of technology-induced changes in our perception of delays can have particularly broad consequences."

 

Gotta love that oxymoronic understatement--"particularly broad consequences".

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

- 10 Sites to use with Mobile Phones in Education

Mobile phones in the classroom--I am still struggling with getting my students to connect via twitter much less all these tools, but they stand as a challenge to me to keep them in mind as I re-think lessons, assignments, and other learning 'stuff' for the next semester.  I think they might help you too.  Learning first, tools to support, and no extra tech without careful thought.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

ToolZeit - Google Research Tool - EdReach

ToolZeit - Google Research Tool - EdReach | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Google Research Tool is an easy way to add web information and images to your Docs and Slides."

 

Perhaps it was easy for some, but I found it a little hinky at first.  In other words, I found the directions at EdReach and at Google a little sketchy.  Plus, the settings for the tool is buried in the 'research bar'.  I realize that I am burying the lead here because... I actually love this tool and I think it could become a regular part of my blog posting and my students' writing lives. 

 

I love how I can research in Google and Google Scholar, look for images, cite stuff, change citation style.  This would make it so much easier to write academic style essays to meet the demands of the common core.  I am all for transparency of ideas as one of the prime values of informative, scientific, and academic writing.  This tool makes it easier to gather, sum up, make sense of and share ideas, information, arguments--the "full catastrophe" in Kazantzakis's phrase.

 

I am making a bit of a hash of this myself so see what you can make of it yourself.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Ways to Use Google Apps in your Classroom

Top 10 Ways to Use Google Apps in your Classroom | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Sometimes all it takes is a list to get you moving.  In this case here is a list on how others have used Google Docs for his or her classroom.

This is a k-12 centric, but as is often the case while your mileage may vary these are freely adaptable to formal and informal ed of all stripes.

 

And a reminder--the question you should always ask first is this:  what learning purpose and for whom?  Then you bring out the repertoire with that audience in mind. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

How to Spot Truth in the Sea of Lies, Rumors, and Myths on the Internet

How to Spot Truth in the Sea of Lies, Rumors, and Myths on the Internet | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

We need to show folks how to detect crap online.  In this post the authors use 'questioning' as the prime tool for this.  I love their first question:  How do you know what you know?  I also love how these questions cut both ways and allow us to be skeptical of others as well as our delusory selves.  Handy!  

 

I think that I will have a whole lesson on how to use these questions in writing a research paper. There are lots of other tools here as well including the News360 Periscope extension and the Unsourced Chrome extension.  They got it down now let's see if they got it right.

 

Use in conjunction with Neil Postman's essay about BS/crap detection: http://criticalsnips.wordpress.com/2007/07/22/neil-postman-bullshit-and-the-art-of-crap-detection/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

8 Ideas, 10 Guides, And 17 Tools For A Better Professional Learning Network - TeachThought

I found this to be a mini-course on how to increase personal connection from without and within.  I liked the idea of 'growing' a network.  Seems natural to me.  It also reminds me of the productivity concepts--hard and soft landscape.  Hard landscape is the must-do parts of any day, our hard promises--calendar dates, meetings, classes.  These punctuate our day, but soft landscapes are more what this article is advocating--ways one could create a personal network, connections one might make to do that, and tools one might learn more about to build one's repertoire.

 

Worth a look and worth adding to your soft landscape as you trek through your day.  Keep hydrated.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from Ed Tech Chatter
Scoop.it!

Arne Duncan: ‘White suburban moms’ upset that Common Core shows their kids aren’t ‘brilliant’

Arne Duncan: ‘White suburban moms’ upset that Common Core shows their kids aren’t ‘brilliant’ | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via Jon Samuelson
Terry Elliott's insight:

Combine this with Sebastian Thrun's repudiation of those students from rotten zip codes and you have a classic example of priviledged white male syndrome.  Pathetic. Duncan and Thrun only want to teach the homeogeneous so called 'gifted', what the soviets would call the vanguard of the proletariat, the saving remnant.  Yeah, I've read Animal Farm, too.  What a pair of elitist nimrods!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Discoverables

Discoverables | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Discoverables
Terry Elliott's insight:

Gaming personal presentation on the net.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Dan Awesome's Rage Maker

Dan Awesome's Rage Maker | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
For those times when the best way to say it is through a poorly drawn comic. No watermarks! Your comics are yours.
Terry Elliott's insight:

Thanks to Kevin Hodgson for this great site.  The liberating effect of comics and templates.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

How to make RSA Animate style videos with your class… : Blogush

How to make RSA Animate style videos with your class… : Blogush | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

What an awesome instructional post!

Terry Elliott's insight:

This is a very handy post that gives you instruction, warts and all, on how to create RSA Animate videos.

more...
sarspri's curator insight, January 4, 2013 10:01 PM

 A crazy long, well-documented-with-classroom-photos post with lots of 'teacher thought' (and comments by other teachers). A BIG project!

Rescooped by Terry Elliott from Augmented Reality in the Classroom
Scoop.it!

Visible Thinking

Visible Thinking | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
more...
Terry Elliott's curator insight, December 22, 2012 9:08 AM

 

As our students at all levels (and I teach higher ed comp) become more visually oriented we need to find ways to draw them from where they are toward the text, to get them to wrestle with that and to connect to the visual.  This site is a quick orientation toward reconsidering the visual in one's own thinking and in the thinking of our learners.

 

The idea of thinking routines and ideals fits perfectly into my own metaphors about learning as a set of personal repertoires that create their own 'rhizomatic' connections that reflect the cognitive ecologies in their heads.  The only way to see if a routine works is to try it.

 

Here are some of the routines they suggest, but as you might guess the whole of intellectual life around the planet has been towards adopting and adapting and creating new routines:

 


     What Makes You Say That? Interpretation with justification routine

     Think Puzzle Explore A routine that sets the stage for deeper inquiry

     Think Pair Share A routine for active reasoning and explanation

     Circle of Viewpoints A routine for exploring diverse perspectives

     I used to Think... Now I think... A routine for reflecting on how and why          our thinking has changed

     See Think Wonder A routine for exploring works of art and other
     interesting things

     Compass Points A routine for examining propositions

 

I created one this semester that was intended to subvert the idea behind 'quizzes' in a writing class.  I started the quiz as a standard whole class Q&A.  I divided the class into teams.  I then told them that we would be playing by 'Calvinball Rules'.  These rules were originally promoted by Bill Waterson's eponymous character in the comic strip "Calvin and Hobbes" and represent classic chaotic thinking.  In other words, the rules exist but are whim-generated.  And I changed the rules in outrageous ways that would ultimately lead to a tie between all the teams.  The tie-breaker inevitably led to some random person (leafblower dude outside the classroom window was my favorite choice) who won.  Of course, they had to be present to win so I declared myself the default winner.  This probably only works once a semester although they begged me to play Calvinball Quizzes on a regular basis.  This was an extremely rich and valuable routine.  It was fun, subversive, and memorable.  A great routine.  What did they learn? To open up and explore.  To ease off of the strategic, 'how do I get me my A?" student rat race.  It provided a clean break with high school and gave them a clear anti-routine to help them get outside their own pre-built boxes.

 

We need all kinds of routines, but it is the learners who need to come up with the ones that fit their peculiar puzzles and their unique personalities.  This is a great place to start.

 

 

 

 

 

Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

6 Useful Apps to Create Short Movie

6 Useful Apps to Create Short Movie | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Terry Elliott's insight:

Here is what I call Christmas holiday fun.  Learning. What a rush!  And there are lots of applications for this for teaching, for students teaching peers, for students in general.  So I will report back as I discover more about these apps.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from Voices in the Feminine - Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

The Creative and the Curious: When learners roam free

Keynote presentation from the EDEN Research Workshop, KU Leuven, Belgium, 22 October 2012...

 

Wow!  I don't even know the context for this keynote, but I think it is rich ecosystem with lots of deep niches for exploring.  Teachers need to read this for the sake of their learners.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Terry Elliott's comment, December 4, 2012 6:21 AM
This is an evocative slideshare that makes me wish I had a bit fuller context. Viewing this makes me think I am climbing a tree in winter time. I can see the beautiful bare branching limbs, but I am missing the leaves. Not complaining, just noting.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

uClassify - free text classifier web service

Experiment and improvise with this word cloud parser.  Feed in the text, choose an analytical knife (gender, pos/neg, tonality) and you have a data analysis.  It might be useless in actuality but the exploration and discovery of that might be a great learning tool.  When I teach the analysis essay I find it is the hardest for my students to do.  They have such a tough time because they do not understand a careful definition of analysis.  The metaphor I use is a knife.  It is a tool for parsing the meat of an essay and getting at the assumptions hidden there. 

 

I realize this is only one way of looking at text, but uClassify might help beginners to tease apart the knot of analysis.  I took a web article (http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2012/11/23/harries-referencing-tools/) and did a uClassify analysis of positive/negative tone in it--75% positive.  Perhaps students could do an in-class experiment--half know the analysis before they read it and half don't.  How does this affect their comprehension of the text?  I know this isn't very clean as an experimental design,but you might open up the idea of analyzing this way.

 

You might also get learners to create their own 'classifiers' which I think is the real power of this site.  Give it a go.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

inkle » inklewriter

inkle » inklewriter | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

I haven't vetted this properly yet but the video is very appealing and it looks like I might have a morning to play with it over Thanksgiving.  Gotta love the anticipation.  This looks like fun for all ages.  Mayge I can get a nephew or niece to play along. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Moving Into a Learning Niche

Moving Into a Learning Niche | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"When you find something you want to view later, put it in Pocket."  That is the former ReadItLater's new motto.  More and more we are seeing these all-in-one systems that are hardware and software agnostic.  Evernote and Dropbox spring to mind in my own personal use.  Pocket is another.  I have used this app before, but now I am ready to give it a second look especially since I am working to bring my iPad into my teaching workflow.  

 

With the advent of sites like IFTTT it is possible to tie all of your digital life together, but it is also true that adding new niches like this can be disruptive, too.  For example, when and how will I review all the gathered pieces that this app brings in?  Will some of it happen on the fly and others later?  I have had similar issues with Diigo that I have settled by using that tool for very specific purposes, for example annotation, shared lists, group lists, and presentation.  Will the same be true of Pocket?  Will I use it for specific projects?  Will I have a specific time daily for review?  Will I keep everything, archive, or dump after looking.

 

One thing is very certain--I won't be able to figure it out without trying it religiously for a couple of weeks.  I will keep you posted on this little experiment and sample of one.

 

Here is where I have Pocket installed:

 

Desktop Mac

Desktop PC

iPad

iPod

Android phone

Firefox

Chrome

IFTTT

       Pocket read/archived PDF's---> Dropbox

       Pocket read items--> Buffer

       Google Reader starred items--> Pocket

       YouTube vid marked watch later--> Pocket

       RSS feed (Cool Tools) --> Pocket

       FavTweet--> Pocket

       Pocket--> Instapaper (Kindle reading)

       NateSilver's 538 blog--> Pocket

 

 

 

Release the hounds, Smithers! And let the iPad be Mission Control.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Terry Elliott from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

A Literacy of the Imagination: The Book - A Literacy of the Imagination

A Literacy of the Imagination: The Book - A Literacy of the Imagination | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

The imagination is our greatest technology.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Terry Elliott
Scoop.it!

Backup your Files to Amazon Glacier with the help of Dropbox

Five Stars in my 'handy-as-a-pocket-on-your-shirt'-o-meter.  Amit Agarwal's newsletter, Digital Inspiration, truly is true to its title.  Go to his website and sign up now.

 

 

"You can use Dropbox as a Glacier client and any files that you upload to Dropbox will get saved in your Amazon Glacier Vault."

more...
No comment yet.