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New e-book export feature enabled on Wikipedia — Wikimedia blog

New e-book export feature enabled on Wikipedia — Wikimedia blog | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Create your own epub using Wikipedia.  I don't even know where to begin here, but you can create your own one here: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:Book&bookcmd=book_creator&referer=Main+Page

 

Here is an epub that took me five minutes to create: https://www.dropbox.com/s/qycbpvs561ctunv/Endless%20Doors%20All%20the%20Way%20Down%20copy.epub

 

What skills and levels of thought are needed to created useful epubs?  I think that this is worth doing as a useful exercise in searching, outlining, organizing, and synthesizing.  I wonder if Wikipedia has made this tool an open one so that other wikis can adapt and adopt it?

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Tech Pedagogy
This topic is about using technology with purpose in the classroom
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Rich Stanton on: Playing human in Earthbound

Rich Stanton on: Playing human in Earthbound | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
The news of Satoru Iwata's death filled me with sadness, and a desire to return to Earthbound - the game that, without his skills, would not exist as it doe…
Terry Elliott's insight:

Definition of a video game acc to Stanton:  "a world and inhabitants that have emotionally engaging qualities."


Is this also what the game of learning is if you view it as a social, connected act?  I think so.  

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Video-based feedback on student assessment: scarily personal | Henderson | Australasian Journal of Educational Technology

Video-based feedback on student assessment: scarily personal
Terry Elliott's insight:

Definitely worth the read even if you have get past  faux objective nonsense like this: "...

experienced, if not joy, at least a sense of purposeful enthusiasm and curious anticipation. "  Was looking forward to how they were defining feed forward, but nary a word defining it.  

 

Especially like how they categorized the video responses from "salutation" to "valediction".  Here are the rest:

 

Salutation 

Conversational/informal salutation: “Hi Lee” 

Relational work 

Recognition and valuing of the student including personal circumstance and history. This both draws on and reinforces the pedagogical relationship between teacher and student. This might include a sympathetic comment (e.g., “I know you have been quite ill lately and I am truly impressed that ...”), appreciation of effort of previous drafts (e.g., “I can see you have made a lot of changes to your introduction”), reaction to quality or other aspect of submission (e.g., “Thank you for submitting ... I can see how much effort ...”). 

Evaluative summary 

General statement of evaluation, not necessarily the grade or mark. Very few of the videos specifically stated the grade, which was indicated to the students before they opened the video. A general evaluative statement here provided a chance to highlight the overall strength and weakness of the assignment before dealing with the more specific issues. For instance, “The essay is very strong in its theoretical approach… need work in ...” and “I thoroughly enjoyed … but there are some issues we need to talk about, namely ...” 

Textual issues 

Briefly describing the nature, patterns and extent of textual issues (e.g., grammar, punctuation, flow, formatting) in this assignment, occasionally with one or two specific examples. This segment of the feedback is short but generally included the same volume of comments about textual issues as the final evaluative notes in the text-based feedback (but not the specificity of the in-text edits). 

Commenting on the substance of the assignment with an emphasis on feed forward. 

Engaging with the conclusions, arguments, logic, justification, and literature included in the assignment. Commenting on strengths, weaknesses, flaws, gaps, creativity and insights. Importantly, comments were phrased to emphasise how students can improve their grades in future work and how they can extend their thinking about the substance of the assignment. This might include examples of alternative arguments, additional literature and different ways to think or approach the topic. Usually 2 to 3 issues were discussed in detail, regardless of result. 

Valediction and invitation 

This is largely relational work. Usually involving use of student name, coupled with congratulations or commiseration over result or other interpersonal validation, such as, best wishes for future studies / holiday. 

Importantly, this structural component included an invitation to contact the lecturer to “continue the discussion” of this feedback and future work. 

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Impedagogy

Impedagogy | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
I can revive the signals ...~Richard Taylor
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How boy bands and their followers can lead us from the emerging future.  

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Sheila Fredericks's curator insight, August 6, 1:50 PM

How boy bands and their followers can lead us from the emerging future.  

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Will It Take An Apocalypse?

Will It Take An Apocalypse? | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

I am listening to (and reading) Neal Stephenson's latest novel Seveneves, an apocalypse novel about the days leading up to a mass extinction event called 'the white rain' and beyond.  Without going...

Terry Elliott's insight:

What will change our schools?

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Virtual Reality: The VR headsets to buy in 2015, whatever your budget - Pocket-lint

Virtual Reality: The VR headsets to buy in 2015, whatever your budget - Pocket-lint | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Although it seems like just yesterday that virtual reality hysteria was reignited, it's actually been a few years now, which is plenty of time for more
Terry Elliott's insight:

Well...what fun could be had?  

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Holy Meta, Batman! Posting about Podcasting then Podcasting the Posting about Podcasting | Impedagogy

Holy Meta, Batman! Posting about Podcasting then Podcasting the Posting about Podcasting | Impedagogy | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via Terence Elliott
Terry Elliott's insight:

A post prompted by a strong desire to be a part of the resurgence in podcasting.  

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Terence Elliott's curator insight, December 28, 2014 11:24 AM

Podcasting is on the rise.  All hail the podcast.

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Displaying analytics data on site pages using Google Apps Script - Desktop Liberation

Displaying analytics data on site pages using Google Apps Script - Desktop Liberation | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

This post from Apps Script GDE Bruce Mcpherson steps through the process of collecting and displaying page analytics. Here's the details of what's covered: Getting analytics for the site Getting the pages in the site Matching Analytics to sites pagesDealing with recursion Storing options and parameters Database abstraction of site results Retrieving page data from GAS web service Using a canvas in Google sites Working with hyperlinks in canvas Gadget preferences and parameters Light JSONP implementation


Via Martin Hawksey
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Not just more info, but actionable info.  Better info.

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Arne Duncan: ‘White suburban moms’ upset that Common Core shows their kids aren’t ‘brilliant’

Arne Duncan: ‘White suburban moms’ upset that Common Core shows their kids aren’t ‘brilliant’ | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Via Jon Samuelson
Terry Elliott's insight:

Combine this with Sebastian Thrun's repudiation of those students from rotten zip codes and you have a classic example of priviledged white male syndrome.  Pathetic. Duncan and Thrun only want to teach the homeogeneous so called 'gifted', what the soviets would call the vanguard of the proletariat, the saving remnant.  Yeah, I've read Animal Farm, too.  What a pair of elitist nimrods!

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Dan Awesome's Rage Maker

Dan Awesome's Rage Maker | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
For those times when the best way to say it is through a poorly drawn comic. No watermarks! Your comics are yours.
Terry Elliott's insight:

Thanks to Kevin Hodgson for this great site.  The liberating effect of comics and templates.

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How to make RSA Animate style videos with your class… : Blogush

How to make RSA Animate style videos with your class… : Blogush | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

What an awesome instructional post!

Terry Elliott's insight:

This is a very handy post that gives you instruction, warts and all, on how to create RSA Animate videos.

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sarspri's curator insight, January 4, 2013 10:01 PM

 A crazy long, well-documented-with-classroom-photos post with lots of 'teacher thought' (and comments by other teachers). A BIG project!

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Visible Thinking

Visible Thinking | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
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Terry Elliott's curator insight, December 22, 2012 9:08 AM

 

As our students at all levels (and I teach higher ed comp) become more visually oriented we need to find ways to draw them from where they are toward the text, to get them to wrestle with that and to connect to the visual.  This site is a quick orientation toward reconsidering the visual in one's own thinking and in the thinking of our learners.

 

The idea of thinking routines and ideals fits perfectly into my own metaphors about learning as a set of personal repertoires that create their own 'rhizomatic' connections that reflect the cognitive ecologies in their heads.  The only way to see if a routine works is to try it.

 

Here are some of the routines they suggest, but as you might guess the whole of intellectual life around the planet has been towards adopting and adapting and creating new routines:

 


     What Makes You Say That? Interpretation with justification routine

     Think Puzzle Explore A routine that sets the stage for deeper inquiry

     Think Pair Share A routine for active reasoning and explanation

     Circle of Viewpoints A routine for exploring diverse perspectives

     I used to Think... Now I think... A routine for reflecting on how and why          our thinking has changed

     See Think Wonder A routine for exploring works of art and other
     interesting things

     Compass Points A routine for examining propositions

 

I created one this semester that was intended to subvert the idea behind 'quizzes' in a writing class.  I started the quiz as a standard whole class Q&A.  I divided the class into teams.  I then told them that we would be playing by 'Calvinball Rules'.  These rules were originally promoted by Bill Waterson's eponymous character in the comic strip "Calvin and Hobbes" and represent classic chaotic thinking.  In other words, the rules exist but are whim-generated.  And I changed the rules in outrageous ways that would ultimately lead to a tie between all the teams.  The tie-breaker inevitably led to some random person (leafblower dude outside the classroom window was my favorite choice) who won.  Of course, they had to be present to win so I declared myself the default winner.  This probably only works once a semester although they begged me to play Calvinball Quizzes on a regular basis.  This was an extremely rich and valuable routine.  It was fun, subversive, and memorable.  A great routine.  What did they learn? To open up and explore.  To ease off of the strategic, 'how do I get me my A?" student rat race.  It provided a clean break with high school and gave them a clear anti-routine to help them get outside their own pre-built boxes.

 

We need all kinds of routines, but it is the learners who need to come up with the ones that fit their peculiar puzzles and their unique personalities.  This is a great place to start.

 

 

 

 

 

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6 Useful Apps to Create Short Movie

6 Useful Apps to Create Short Movie | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Terry Elliott's insight:

Here is what I call Christmas holiday fun.  Learning. What a rush!  And there are lots of applications for this for teaching, for students teaching peers, for students in general.  So I will report back as I discover more about these apps.

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Gamasutra: Paul Kilduff-Taylor's Blog - Signifying Nothing: Making Indie Games in 2015

Gamasutra: Paul Kilduff-Taylor's Blog - Signifying Nothing: Making Indie Games in 2015 | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Terry Elliott's insight:

Some of the most evocative advice for teaching seems to be growing out of game, gaming, and game design.  Gamasutra seems to be an especially fertile crescent.  Here is some advice on creating a valid learning space:


Key to game creation success:  1. create a 'pragmatic freedom to roam' 2. combine with social factors     a.  play into human desire to master an environment.      b.  stories generated in those environments   


And a great quote here:


"I think things might eventually change, though. I was massively heartened to read this recent piece on Earthbound by Rich Stanton. He manages to combine an approachably colloquial, personal approach with a nuanced critical awareness.   I recommend reading the whole thing, but here he gives a structural example leading to a liberal humanist conclusion: “ A more comprehensive UI technique is used when a party member is KO’d… One of Earthbound’s core themes is the importance of friendship, so the effect is not accidental.” One of my strongest beliefs about criticism is that it needs hybrid vigour to survive: no one school of thought is going to have all the answers. If you can combine post-structuralist or deconstructionist thought, liberal humanist “themes”, modern academic feminist ideas about social relevance, bum jokes from Amiga Power and a story about something that happened to you on a bus…then you’re probably getting close to talking about what a game really is."


That last bit about story seems wise and worth exploring.

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Home

Home | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Seesaw

Student Driven Digital Portfolios

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Terry Elliott's insight:

Anybody using this tool yet.  Available for iOS, Android, Chromebooks, desktop.  Be fun to have a student or three to test drive and report back.   

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Hackathons as a New Pedagogy

Hackathons as a New Pedagogy | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
The hackathon, a hands-on, solution-based development model with similarities to PBL, inquiry-based learning, STEAM, and design thinking, could become the ideal 21st-century learning opportunity.
Terry Elliott's insight:

Time to start adding movement and spectacle to your classroom, or at least quiet spectacle and wonder.  Here's one way: hackathons.

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Slow Viewing

Slow Viewing | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
    No, Charlie B, I will not shut up. In fact Charlie, if you don't like it, turn around. It's an experiment, only I am not going to use you for some vague research agenda. What I have f...
Terry Elliott's insight:

This is an exploration of slow viewing--in this case a video.  

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critique and feedback - the story of austin's butterfly - Ron Berger - YouTube

Featuring Ron Berger from Expeditionary Learning. Produced by David Grant www.elschools.org www.realschoolchange.org Help us caption & translate this video! ...
Terry Elliott's insight:

Seen it before but goof to be reminded of its relevant points.

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Healthy Habits of Mind - Mindful Schools: Online Courses for Learning Mindfulness and Teaching Mindfulness to K-12 Children and Adolescents

Healthy Habits of Mind - Mindful Schools: Online Courses for Learning Mindfulness and Teaching Mindfulness to K-12 Children and Adolescents | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
This free film describes why mindfulness belongs in education, covering neuroscience, educator training, and showing mindfulness implemented in the classroom. Watch the Film Share on: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ Film Summary Mette Bahnsen, a filmmaker in Denmark, has made a beautifully produced film about integrating mindfulness into education called “Healthy Habits of Mind”, which features: …
Terry Elliott's insight:

A marvelous film. So much to learn here.

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Goodbye university? Revolution vs. evolution of the current education model - ICEF Monitor - Market intelligence for international student recruitment

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MOOC future analysis.  Hmmm.  Lots of good here.  Good categorization of issues and possible futures.

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Announcing: Curated Newsletters and MailChimp Integration | Scoop.it Blog

Announcing: Curated Newsletters and MailChimp Integration | Scoop.it Blog | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
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Paula Silva's comment, March 4, 2014 7:25 AM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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Ebook Glue | Turn your blog into a downloadable ebook.

Give your content a new reading experiece. Ebook Glue lets you quickly publish your writing as a downloadable ebook for Kindle, Nook, Kobo, Android, iOS, Sony, and other readers.
Terry Elliott's insight:

If you think of your blog as a portfolio, then Ebook Glue is your way of publishing your RSS feed as an ebook in various formats.  Could this become a regular part of every online CV/resume?  Maybe a cheap substitute for proprietary educational portfolio systems? I do like this and I like especially that it is a one-person shop from start to finish. 

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Alina Ghimpu-Hague's curator insight, February 4, 2013 12:23 PM

I have not tried it yet, but it does sound interesting.

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Twitter as a Curation Tool

Twitter as a Curation Tool | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Excellent post from Langwitches! She addresses the progression of moving from collector to curator, quoting Mike Fisher, who observed, "Curating is different. It’s the Critical Thinker’s collection, and involves several nuances that separate it as an independent and classroom-worthy task." Sylvia writes: "There are different sides to Twitter as a Curation tool: Taking advantage of a network of curators working for you (building your own customized network), consuming their curated information Collecting, organizing, connecting, attributing, interpreting, summarizing the vast amount of information that comes across your desk/ feed /books/articles/etc. for YOURSELF! Becoming consciously the curator for others for a particular niche, area of expertise or interest. Disseminate resources, add value, put in perspective, create connections, present in a different light/media/language. Real time curation allows you to be part of an event, that you physically might not be attending or being on the opposite end allows you to be the bridge for others to participate at an event where you are present, but your network is not."


Via Nancy White
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Intrusive Scaffolding, Obstructed Learning (and MOOCs)

Intrusive Scaffolding, Obstructed Learning (and MOOCs) | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
My five-year-old son recently learned how to ride a bike. He mastered the essential components of cycling—balance, peddling, and steering—in roughly ten minutes. Without using training wheels, ever...
Terry Elliott's insight:

Mark Sample writes in this post about what he calls 'intrusive, obstructive scaffolding".

 

     "Training wheels are a kind of scaffolding. But they are intrusive        scaffolding,      obstructive scaffolding. These bulky metal add-ons get in the way quite            literally, but they also interfere pedagogically. Riding a bike with training            wheels prepares a child for nothing more than riding a bike—with training        wheels."

 

How does this apply to tech pedagogy?  When I teach new tech tools in the classroom I introduce the broad outlines then I ask them to begin the job at hand.  If they have problems they turn to the student on the right and ask them if can help.  If they can't help then I ask them to turn to the right.  If she can't help, then they can ask me.  I then ask everyone, "Hey can you help with  this?"  If no one knows, then I show the person who originally asked and appoint that student to be the new go to person for that that question.  Yes.  Always?  Not always, but it works well enough that it has become a learning routine in my classes.

 

I think this is what Sample means.  In the context of MOOC's he argues that the whole course is scaffolding on a massive scale and he ask the legitimate question, "Where the hell are the people?" 

 

And what is the danger if we don't bring back the people?

 

     "I want to suggest that unless online teaching—and classroom teaching as        well—begins to first, unscaffold learning problems and second, rediscover        embodied pedagogy, we will obstruct learning rather than foster it. We              will push students away from authentic learning experiences rather than          draw them toward such experiences."

 

Amen.  What do you think?  Respond below.

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The History 2.0 Classroom: Student Portfolios X iPads

The History 2.0 Classroom: Student Portfolios X iPads | Tech Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Terry Elliott's insight:

Three different clouds for managing portfolio workflow--Google Drive, Evernote, and Book Creator.  I might add one more to this--Wordpress + the Anthologize plug-in. 

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