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3 Trends Shaping The Future Of Product Development - hypebot

Guest post by Max Engel (@8bitkid) for sidewinder.fm, a music and tech think tank. Content providers are at a crossroads in the evolution of narratives online.

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Moneyball For Music: The Rise of Next Big Sound - Forbes

Moneyball For Music: The Rise of Next Big Sound - Forbes | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
Alex White's Next Big Sound is using advanced statistics to transform a stubborn industry. Sound familiar?


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Business Matters: The Success and Failures of Popular Albums Since iTunes

Business Matters: The Success and Failures of Popular Albums Since iTunes | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it

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Digital Music News - We're BandWagon. And We Want to Fix the Sonicbids 'Pay-to-Play' Problem...

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Forget Twitter, SoundCloud Is Social Music's Rising Star

Forget Twitter, SoundCloud Is Social Music's Rising Star | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
2012 was been a very good year for SoundCloud. What's behind the social music and audio-hosting platform's massive uptick in user activity?

Via stan stewart
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stan stewart's curator insight, January 23, 2013 9:23 PM

I'm not ready to abondon Twitter. And SoundCloud is definitely cool and on the rise.

stan stewart's comment, January 24, 2013 2:37 PM
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Here’s How Spotify Scales Up And Stays Agile: It Runs ‘Squads’ Like Lean Startups | TechCrunch

Here’s How Spotify Scales Up And Stays Agile: It Runs ‘Squads’ Like Lean Startups | TechCrunch | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
What's the secret to staying fresh, lean and mean when you're a hot tech company on a fast growth trajectory?
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These Are the Tech Job Hot Spots [INFOGRAPHIC]

These Are the Tech Job Hot Spots [INFOGRAPHIC] | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
Silicon Alley has nearly caught up to Silicon Valley in terms of the number of tech positions, according to a new report.
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If Content Is King, Multiscreen Is The Queen, Says New Google Study | TechCrunch

If Content Is King, Multiscreen Is The Queen, Says New Google Study | TechCrunch | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
New research out from Google, working with market analysts Ipsos and Sterling Brands, puts some hard numbers behind the often-noticed trend of how people in the U.S.
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Swarm.fm App Turns Spotify Into a Social Music Network

Swarm.fm App Turns Spotify Into a Social Music Network | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
Spotify rolled out a new app yesterday: Swarm.fm, which adds new social music features to both Spotify and Facebook. So, how did Swarm.fm stack up?
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SFX Entertainment Buys Electronic Dance Music Site

SFX Entertainment Buys  Electronic Dance Music Site | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
SFX Entertainment paid just above $50 million for Beatport, people briefed on the matter said. The site is the pre-eminent download store for E.D.M.

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30 Years Of The CD, Of Digital Piracy, And Of Music Industry Cluelessness | Techdirt

30 Years Of The CD, Of Digital Piracy, And Of Music Industry Cluelessness | Techdirt | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
A post on The Next Web reminds us that the CD is thirty years old this month.



Via Musica, Copyright & Tecnologia
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Sony Music CEO Doug Morris Is Streaming Big

Sony Music CEO Doug Morris Is Streaming Big | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
The case for the future of the music business, featuring a 74-year-old who's BFFs with Bono and Adele—and right at home in the age of Spotify and Pandora


Via Jérôme Rastoldo
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Show Up Public's curator insight, February 27, 2013 8:38 AM

I'm glad someone's making money.:(  Anyway, what was interesting is that pop classic artist like Adele still makes the bulk of her revenue from physical sales. Where as an alternative artis like Goyte makes his money in downloads. Two different marketing cultures  for two different artists. Something to think about for the independent when ordering up your next shipment of CDs.

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Music Discovery Is A Burned Out Phrase - hypebot

By freelance music writer Tyler Hayes (@thealbumproject).


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The Interdependency of Music and Technology

The Interdependency of Music and Technology | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
The music business has been utterly transformed by technology. New music apps such as Pandora, Spotify, Soundcloud, Shazam and Songza among hundreds of others are driving new music revenue and empl...


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The Ten Most Interesting Startups of 2012 | Billboard.biz

The Ten Most Interesting Startups of 2012 | Billboard.biz | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
Unlike years past, 2012 list of most ten most interesting start-up doesn't have a single service on the list that requires licenses record labels to operate. Instead, the...
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Mary Meeker's Latest Must-Read Presentation On The State Of The Web

Mary Meeker's Latest Must-Read Presentation On The State Of The Web | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know....
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Entrepreneurshit. The Blog Post on What It’s Really Like.

Entrepreneurshit. The Blog Post on What It’s Really Like. | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
It's 4.50am. Sunday morning. And I couldn't sleep. I have much on my mind since I just returned from a week on the road. 5 days. 3 cities.
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The Computer as Music Critic

The Computer as Music Critic | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it

Thanks to advances in computing power, we can analyze music in radically new and different ways. Computers are still far from grasping some of the deep and often unexpected nuances that release our most intimate emotions. However, by processing vast amounts of raw data and performing unprecedented large-scale analyses beyond the reach of teams of human experts, they can provide valuable insight into some of the most basic aspects of musical discourse, including the evolution of popular music over the years. Has there been an evolution? Can we measure it? And if so, what do we observe?

 

In a recent article published in the journal Scientific Reports, authors used computers to analyze 464,411 Western popular music recordings released between 1955 and 2010, including pop, rock, hip-hop, folk and funk. They first looked for static patterns characterizing the generic use of primary musical elements like pitch, timbre and loudness. They then measured a number of general trends for these elements over the years.

 

Common practice in the growing field of music information processing starts by cutting an audio signal into short slices — in our case the musical beat, which is the most relevant and recognizable temporal unit in music (the beat roughly corresponds to the periodic, sometimes unconscious foot-tapping of music listeners).

 

For each slice, computers represented basic musical information with a series of numbers. For pitch, they computed the relative intensity of the notes present in every beat slice, thus accounting for the basic harmony, melody and chords. For timbre, what some call the “color” of a note, they measured the general waveform characteristics of each slice, thus accounting for the basic sonority of a given beat and the combinations of instruments and effects. And for loudness, they calculated the energy of each slice, accounting for sound volume or perceived intensity.

 

They then constructed a music “vocabulary”: they assigned code words to slice-based numbers to generate a “text” that could represent the popular musical discourse of a given year or age. Doing so allowed to discover static patterns by counting how many different code words appeared in a given year, how often they were used and which were the most common successions of code words at a given point in time.

 

Interestingly, in creating a musical “vocabulary,” they found a well-known phenomenon common in written texts and many other domains: Zipf’s law, which predicts that the most frequent word in a text will appear twice as often as the next most frequent word, three times as often as the third most frequent, and so on. The same thing, they found, goes for music.

 

If we suppose that the most common note combination is used 100 times, the second most common combination will be used 50 times and the third 33 times. Importantly, they found that Zipf’s law held for each year’s vocabulary, from 1955 to 2010, with almost exactly the same “usage ordering” of code words every year. That suggests a general, static rule, one shared with linguistic texts and many other natural and artificial phenomena.

 

Beyond these static patterns, they also found three significant trends over time. Again using pitch code words, they counted the different transitions between note combinations and found that this number decreased over the decades. The analysis also indicated that pop music’s variety of timbre has been decreasing since the 1960s, meaning that artists and composers tend to stick to the same sound qualities — in other words, instruments playing the same notes sound more similar than they once did. Finally, they found that recording levels had consistently increased since 1955, confirming a so-called race toward louder music.


Via Olivier Lartillot, Simon Decreuze, Vincent Castaignet
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It's Becoming Clear That No One Actually Read Facebook's IPO Prospectus Or Mark Zuckerberg's Letter To Shareholders

It's Becoming Clear That No One Actually Read Facebook's IPO Prospectus Or Mark Zuckerberg's Letter To Shareholders | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
If they had, they wouldn't be surprised by what's happened.
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BandPage Unshackles From Facebook, Now Helps 500K Musicians Build Synced Sites and Widgets Too | TechCrunch

BandPage Unshackles From Facebook, Now Helps 500K Musicians Build Synced Sites and Widgets Too | TechCrunch | The New Business of Music Technology | Scoop.it
With $19 million in funding but the Timeline redesign cratering its traffic, BandPage needed to diversify beyond Facebook. So today it launches BandPage Everywhere to let musicians build websites and embeddable widgets as well as Facebook Page apps.
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