Teaching and learning English ideas
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Teaching and learning English ideas
I am always curious about web based resources and news about learning and teaching English.
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Music: The missing piece of your language learning puzzle?

Music: The missing piece of your language learning puzzle? | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Scientific evidence indicates that listening to music can help dramatically to improve your language learning. Here we discuss that premise.
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Malawi schools to teach in English - Aljazeera.com

Malawi schools to teach in English - Aljazeera.com | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Aljazeera.com Malawi schools to teach in English Aljazeera.com He said it was more sensible to start using English as a language of instruction from standard five because this is when learners have mastered the basics of many concepts that they...
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Teachers spend out-of-pocket for classes - Anderson Independent Mail

Teachers spend out-of-pocket for classes - Anderson Independent Mail | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Teachers spend out-of-pocket for classes
Anderson Independent Mail
Some teachers said they purchase extra-curriculum materials, such as worksheets, guided reading lessons and project ideas, out of pocket.
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Placement test for learners of English

Placement test for learners of English | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Placement tests are very important for students of languages. First, they can serve as motivation because they show whether the students improved their knowledge. Second, they help students choose the...

Via Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat
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Pope's English on Display for First Time in SKorea - ABC News

Pope's English on Display for First Time in SKorea - ABC News | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Fox News Pope's English on Display for First Time in SKorea ABC News But he has gamely ventured into uncharted linguistic territory during his South Korea visit, delivering a handful of speeches in English and even speaking off the cuff Friday in...
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Bilinguality in Europe

Bilinguality in Europe | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Click to see the pic and write a comment...

Via Nicos Sifakis, Evdokia Roka
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I didn`t know we had such low fegures in terms of English speakers.

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Nicos Sifakis's curator insight, July 14, 2014 6:35 AM

With special thanks to Yasemin Bayyurt.

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British Quiz – How much do you know about Britain?

British Quiz – How much do you know about Britain? | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
How much do you know about Britain?
When you learn a language, you also learn a little bit about the culture.

Via EFL SMARTblog, Evdokia Roka
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How to read in a foreign language

Article on the blog: http://www.thepolyglotdream.com/reading/ Luca and David talk about the importance of reading in general, and how to do it in a foreign language (article coming out tomorrow...
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Interesting point of view and nice way to present the topic

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Some stats about English language

English Language 1- English is the official language in 54 countries. 2- English is a west Germanic language. 3- The English language belongs to the Anglo-Frisian sub-group 4- English is spoken by ...

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Jose Juan Herrerias's curator insight, February 24, 2014 1:18 AM

Spanish people don't want to be aware that English has got many more words than Spanish has.

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Talking to babies helps them to build vocabulary, language skills - Columbia Daily Tribune

Talking to babies helps them to build vocabulary, language skills - Columbia Daily Tribune | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Talking to babies helps them to build vocabulary, language skills
Columbia Daily Tribune
WASHINGTON — Using videos that claim to teach toddlers or flash cards for tots might not be the best idea.
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The English expressions coined in WW1 - BBC News

The English expressions coined in WW1 - BBC News | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
BBC News
The English expressions coined in WW1
BBC News
World War One gave rise to expressions and slang such as blighty and cushy, but only some are still used, says Kate Wild, senior assistant editor of the Oxford English Dictionary.
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HOMOPHONES, HOMONYMS & HOMOGRAPHS

HOMOPHONES, HOMONYMS & HOMOGRAPHS | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Homophones are words that sound alike but have different spellings and meanings (We'll practise them in class - HOMOPHONES) Homonyms are words that have the same spelling and  pronunciation, but di...

Via Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat
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This is a topic I had dealt with years ago and just by change I found this article on the web.

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Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:28 AM

Further to my post on Homophones, here are some great worksheets that you can use by Gordana Popovic.

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Does learning a second language lead to a new identity? | OxfordWords blog

Does learning a second language lead to a new identity? | OxfordWords blog | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Every day I get asked why second language learning is so hard and what can be done to make it easier. One day a student came up to me after class and asked (RT @SeroComms: Does learning a second #language lead to a new #identity?
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Here's How Foreign Language Speakers Typically Screw Up English - Business Insider

Here's How Foreign Language Speakers Typically Screw Up English - Business Insider | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Computer scientists at MIT and Israel's Technion recently developed an algorithm that analyzes quirks and errors in English-as-a-second-language (ESL)...

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, August 21, 2014 9:02 PM

Computer scientists at MIT and Israel’s Technion recently developed an algorithm that analyzes quirks and errors in English-as-a-second-language (ESL) essays to predict the author’s native tongue, potentially unlocking new tools for translation and teaching and also producing an alternative map of language similarity.

The breakthrough got us thinking: How do native speakers of different languages typically screw up English?

Researchers Dr. Boris Katz and graduate student Yevgeni Berzak offered the following examples over email:

In Russian, there are no determiners (no words equivalent to “a” and “the” in English). As a result, native speakers of Russian tend to omit determiners in English. For example, a native speaker of Russian uses the following sentence in our data: “I was champion of swimming competition in Russia,” instead of, “I was the champion of a swimming competition in Russia.” Another example is “Everyone has now a car” which would be the correct order of modifiers if translated word-to-word to Russian, instead of the proper form in English “Everyone has a car now.”

In French, adjectives follow nouns (in most cases). Consequently, native speakers of French use phrases such as “lessons very important” instead of “very important lessons,” “afternoon free” instead of “free afternoon” and so forth. Another pattern that is common with French natives is preference for the construction “noun preposition noun” over “noun noun” compounds which are less frequent in French. Hence, French natives may prefer “licence for sailing” over “sailing licence,” and “manager of Bruce Springsteen” instead of “Bruce Springsteen’s manager.”

With natives of German we have the example “The pollution will more and more increase,” which would be the correct position of the verb in German.

Two other types of ESL patterns that are influenced by the native language are prepositions, and count/mass noun distinctions.

ESL learners would often direct-translate the preposition from their native language (for example, Portuguese natives confuse “in” and “on” in a systematic way, based on the usage of the equivalent prepositions in Portuguese).

Different languages have different count/mass noun distinctions. For example “information”, “furniture” and “homework” are count nouns in French, and so natives of French may say “informations”, “furnitures” and “homeworks” in English.

Here’s a description of the process provided by the researchers:

The algorithm receives ESL essays by native speakers of different languages as input. It starts by learning linguistic patterns in ESL that are characteristic of each of these languages. The kind of patterns we take into consideration are word order, syntactic relations between words, and morphological suffixes and prefixes.

Using these patterns it is possible to predict the native language of a given ESL document, but in fact our method reveals something even deeper: based on these patterns, the algorithm estimates the similarity between all the language pairs, and clusters them into a tree. It turns out that this tree is very similar to a tree that one would obtain when using similarities according to the linguistic properties of these languages as manually documented by linguists. These linguistic properties are called “typological features” and refer to things like word order, valid syntactic constructions, how to form negation, are there morphological suffixes and prefixes or not, etc.

Finally, the algorithm uses the ESL-based similarity tree for prediction of typological features of languages for which we have no prior linguistic data. For example, imagine that I know nothing about the typological features of Portuguese (I don’t know the correct word order, how to form negation etc), but I have a bunch of ESL documents written by natives of Portuguese. Using the similarity tree from ESL, I can determine that Portuguese is in fact similar to Spanish and Catalan. Assuming I do know the typological features for these two languages, I can now predict the typological features of Portuguese based on the features of Spanish and Catalan. Of course, this method is not perfect, but it’s a pretty good approximation: in 72% of the cases the predicted typological features are correct.

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Oxford Dictionaries: Are new words 'throwing shade' on real English? - Christian Science Monitor

Oxford Dictionaries: Are new words 'throwing shade' on real English? - Christian Science Monitor | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Christian Science Monitor
Oxford Dictionaries: Are new words 'throwing shade' on real English?
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English Expressions: three-word phrasal verbs

http://www.engvid.com/ Do you know any three-word phrasal verbs? These can be tricky, because sometimes an extra word added to a two-word phrasal verb gives the whole expression a new meaning!...
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Gene Simmons' Advice to Immigrants: Learn to Speak Goddamn English!

Gene Simmons' Advice to Immigrants: Learn to Speak Goddamn English! | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
Gene Simmons has some advice for immigrants. During an interview with HuffPost Live Monday, the 6... (Gene Simmons' Advice to Immigrants: "Learn to Speak Goddamn English!
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States where English is the official language - Washington Post (blog)

States where English is the official language - Washington Post (blog) | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
States where English is the official language Washington Post (blog) In Missouri, it's even more vague, more of an observation than a designation: “The general assembly recognizes that English is the most common language used in Missouri and...
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Peppa Pig English Episodes New Episodes 2014 Space Adventure Game

Peppa Pig English Episodes New Episodes 2014 Space Adventure Game Peppa Pig English Episodes New Episodes 2014 Space Adventure Game Peppa Pig English Episodes New Episodes 2014 Space Adventure...
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Demise of the printed dictionary?

Demise of the printed dictionary? | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
As TV show Countdown announces that its 'Dictionary Corner' will use the online version of the Oxford Dictionary of English instead of the printed version, could this signal the end of the printed dictionary?
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Teaching languages with technology: tools that help students become fluent - The Guardian

Teaching languages with technology: tools that help students become fluent - The Guardian | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
The Guardian Teaching languages with technology: tools that help students become fluent The Guardian Our challenge is to channel the natural enthusiasm our pupils have for ICT by using it in their everyday lives and embed it purposefully into the...
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Some stats about English language

English Language 1- English is the official language in 54 countries. 2- English is a west Germanic language. 3- The English language belongs to the Anglo-Frisian sub-group 4- English is spoken by ...

Via Mike Davidson
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Spanish people don't want to be aware that English has got many more words than Spanish has.

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Pope Francis Speaks English In iPhone Video For Evangelical Conference - BuzzFeed

Pope Francis Speaks English In iPhone Video For Evangelical Conference - BuzzFeed | Teaching and learning English ideas | Scoop.it
NBC Chicago Pope Francis Speaks English In iPhone Video For Evangelical Conference BuzzFeed This unusual and unofficial video of Pope Francis discussing Christian unity (and speaking English) was recorded on an iPhone for the Kenneth Copeland...
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Collocations | EnglishClub

Collocations for English learners. These pages explain collocations and why they are important. With collocations lists and quizzes.
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I wanted to clarify my students what collocative meaning is to I got hold of this page.

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