Teaching World History and Humanities
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Teaching World History and Humanities
Interesting finds and perspectives for teachers of the world
Curated by Elisha Upton
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Rescooped by Elisha Upton from LHS AP World History
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Ibn Battuta .. Done by Mortada Al Rifai.flv

Video has been done on Power Point 2009, about Ibn Battuta and his life and his journey visit my site: tooda.webs.com

Via Ryan LaHayne
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Rescooped by Elisha Upton from AP Human Geography
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Ancient Roman History Timeline

Ancient Roman History Timeline | Teaching World History and Humanities | Scoop.it
Provides a chronological history of Ancient Rome with extensive links to internet resources.

Via HGI Middle School Library, Erika L Burns, Jeremy Purdy
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 8, 2013 10:37 PM

The descriptions of what is accurate and what is false in the movie Gladiator is especially helpful.

Rescooped by Elisha Upton from K Owens AP World History
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The Columbian Exchange and the Real Story of Globalization

The Columbian Exchange and the Real Story of Globalization | Teaching World History and Humanities | Scoop.it
Trade is an economic activity, but its greatest impact may turn out to be biological. Charles C. Mann, author of 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, on the world made by Columbus and his seafaring heirs.

Via Jeremy Purdy, Kristin Owens
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Rescooped by Elisha Upton from Mrs. Watson's Class
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Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages

Ancient Eurasiatic ‘superfamily’ found at root of European and Asian languages | Teaching World History and Humanities | Scoop.it

"Languages spoken by billions of people across Europe and Asia are descended from an ancient tongue uttered in southern Europe at the end of the last ice age, according to research.  The claim, by scientists in Britain, points to a common origin for vocabularies as varied as English and Urdu, Japanese and Itelmen, a language spoken along the north-eastern edge of Russia.  The ancestral language, spoken at least 15,000 years ago, gave rise to seven more that formed an ancient Eurasiatic 'superfamily', the researchers say. These in turn split into languages now spoken all over Eurasia, from Portugal to Siberia."


Via Nancy Watson
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Time-Space Compression

Time-Space Compression | Teaching World History and Humanities | Scoop.it
In this age of fast travel and instant digital communications, we tend to forget that not so long ago, distances were subjectively very different.

Via Seth Dixon
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geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 4:35 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  

 

Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  "

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 7:54 PM

With the development of modern equipment useful in maneuvering around the world, the time it took those living in the 1800's has been reduced to getting anywhere around the world with time spanning from 30- 24hrs. This of course has been made possible due to the development of roads, better boating constructions and air travel.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:12 PM

Since 1800 the rate of travel has increased exponentially through the years. From the very beginning of travel, it would take close to a week just to get from the east coast to the middle of the United States. Through the use of railroads we have overcome the "time" factor and essentially eliminated it from playing a role in the way we travel. Today's advances in transportation has made seeing others much easier and most importantly it has developed a connected world that allows for transport of goods and services possible to such an extent that as citizens of the United states we are able to access almost anything we need from a day to day basis. A technology like this will continue to expand and grow to make the life of people that much easier.

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Lead Your Empire to Victory in A Brief History of the World, Now On iOS - prMac (press release)

Lead Your Empire to Victory in A Brief History of the World, Now On iOS - prMac (press release) | Teaching World History and Humanities | Scoop.it
Lead Your Empire to Victory in A Brief History of the World, Now On iOS prMac (press release) [prMac.com] Calgary, Canada - Sage Board Games today is pleased to announce the release of their newest mobile title: A Brief History of the World.
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BBC Country Profiles

BBC Country Profiles | Teaching World History and Humanities | Scoop.it
BBC Country Profiles: instant guide to history, politics and economic background of countries and territories, and background on key institutions.

Via Seth Dixon
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Al Picozzi's comment, July 25, 2013 4:55 PM
Great site for quick info. Thanks
Sabrina Wesley's curator insight, July 26, 2013 12:53 AM

Use for History, Geography, and Math

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 30, 2013 5:06 AM

I need a one-stop shop for my classes and maybe this is it.

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Understanding Population Pyramids

This covers what a population pyramid is, and how to analyze one. It covers the three basic shapes and how they correspond to population growth or decline. Fina
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The Voices of China's Workers

TED Talks In the ongoing debate about globalization, what's been missing is the voices of workers -- the millions of people who migrate to factories in China and other emerging countries to make goods sold all over the world.

 

Our collective understanding of modern industrialization and globalization needs to go beyond the binary of "oppressors" and "victims."  This lecture explores the voices and lives of Chinese workers that we so often simply see as simply victims of a system, but are full of ambition and agency. 

 

Tags: industry, globalization, labor, China, TED. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Ryli Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 2:55 PM
In these Chinese factories, they don't view these jobs as harsh or poor treatment because this is better than how they would be doing back in their villages. They want these jobs so bad because they will give them a better life. Also, you have to remember that not all of these Chinese factory workers want to have an iPhone or a Coach purse or Nike shoes, because those things don't have any worth in their culture.
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:26 PM

The plight of Chinese workers today is incredibly great. This TED talks explains the situations many in China find themselves in the terrible conditions they must work in. While us in the west see this as unthinkable China's model for success and expansion comes at the cost of their workforce who are subjugated to poor working conditions as very low pay. The real hope for this to change is for the nation as a whole to become wealthy enough that these workers will be able to demand fair wages and work environments. 

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:08 PM

These workers do see their jobs as opportunities. This video is a great eye opener for people who tend to fall into the trap of looking at globalization as a system of haves and have nots.