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Rescooped by Louise Robinson-Lay from Content Curation World
Scoop.it!

An Introduction to Content Curation and Its Relevance For Students and Teachers

 

 


Via Robin Good
Louise Robinson-Lay's insight:

An overview and information on content curation.

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Dean J. Fusto's comment, September 7, 2013 7:49 AM
Helpful primer on curation and its particular skill set. Thanks for the scoop.
Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, September 7, 2013 7:50 AM

A very helpful primer on content curation.

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 22, 2013 5:49 PM

 

Stacia Johnson and Melissa Marsh have recorded a 10-minute video introducing to Content Curation for their EDCI515 graduate course at the University of Victoria.

 

Topics covered:

Defining CurationWhat skills neededWhat tools can help

 

good summary recomendet to anyone interested in content-curation and its aplications in learning

 

Rescooped by Louise Robinson-Lay from Teaching in the XXI Century
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Facilitating Collaborative Learning: 20 Things You Need to Know From the Pros

Facilitating Collaborative Learning: 20 Things You Need to Know From the Pros | teaching with technology | Scoop.it

Why have your students work collaboratively? "Collaborative learning teams are said to attain higher levels of thinking and preserve information for longer times that students working individually."

This post provides 20 suggestions to help collaborative groups work more effectively. A few are:

* Establish group goals.

* Keep groups mid-sized.

* Build trust and promote open communication.

* Consider the learning process asa part of the assessment.

The post includes links to a variety of resources and each point has an explantion with additional information.


Via Beth Dichter, João Greno Brogueira
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Channylt's curator insight, April 7, 2014 10:56 AM

Great tips on how to facilitate collaborative learning. Learners that work collaborativley are engaged in their learning and have better learning outcomes. 

Marina Cousins's curator insight, April 10, 2014 8:06 PM

I liked this article, as it highlighted to me the importance of collaborative learning is much better than individual learning.  As I have mentioned several times, the learning and assessment that takes place within my workplace has a strong behaviourist foundation of learning and repeating key words and actions to pass an assessment (it is a very individual approach to learning).

 

Many of my colleagues view this experience of learning & assessment in a negative way.  What are some of the ways to overcome this negative view of learning?

 

After reading this article, I will seriously consider using a collaborative learning style within my workplace (if I get the opportunity).  The advantage of using real world problems or clinical incidents is that it offers the learner the opportunitity to improve their critical thinking skills and problem-solving ability.  

 

Therefore, by using collaborative learning you can apply the following learning theories of cognitivism, constructivism, objectivism.

Hazel Kuveya's curator insight, April 10, 2014 9:22 PM

Keeping the groups at moderate levels will ensure an effective exchange of ideas and participation in all involved, I can echo the same statement that two heads are better than one. It is also interesting to learn that collaborative teams attain higher level thinking and preserve information for longer periods as compared to  their individual counterparts., yes the use of technology makes collaborative learning manageable.

Rescooped by Louise Robinson-Lay from Differentiation Strategies
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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | teaching with technology | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, kathyvsr
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

Rescooped by Louise Robinson-Lay from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
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Students First - then look at the technology

Students First - then look at the technology | teaching with technology | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Louise Robinson-Lay's insight:

The ASCD publish magazines for educators on important issues. This issue is on the use of technology.

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Guy Garey's curator insight, March 14, 2013 4:36 AM

This is an excellent article that essentially asks all of us - student, teacher, administrator (& even parent) to consider just what is meant by education. The technology available now prods us, forces us, to consider society... a world with different capabilities. It can be, as Mr Richardson says, additive - that is doing the old thing a new way (ironically using a biblical allusion of old wine in new wineskins - some things never change). Or, our reaction can be ecological, that is essentially changed. This may be a case of simultaneously being 'the medium is the message' (our tech forces us to do things differently, and 'the medium is not the message' ('he tangata, he tangata, he tangata - it is people, it is people, it is people'). Highly recommended.

Rod Murray's comment, April 2, 2013 8:04 PM
Tech does not drive the learning, learning has to drive the technology.
Rescooped by Louise Robinson-Lay from Personal Learning Network
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4 things you need to know to help your students manage their online reputation [Infographic]

4 things you need to know to help your students manage their online reputation [Infographic] | teaching with technology | Scoop.it

 

We often hear complaints about what students say and do online, but we often neglect to look into educators helping them manage their online reputation. This infographic is geared toward adults, but it can serve as a great starting point for conversations and activities that educators can engage in with students to help them to establish an active digital footprint that represents who they want to be perceived as online.

 


Via Made Hery Santosa, Gust MEES, Elena Elliniadou
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