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For Lessons About Social Class, a Field Trip Takes Students Right Back Home

For Lessons About Social Class, a Field Trip Takes Students Right Back Home | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
By visiting classmates’ homes during the school day, 4- and 5-year-olds at the Manhattan Country School learn to celebrate their differences.
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

What a brilliant idea. Providing everything aligns in terms of safety and permissions, this would be a wonderful way to increase empathy in upper grades as well.

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11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation

11 Hilarious Hoax Sites to Test Website Evaluation | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
In this day and age, where anyone with access to the internet can create a website, it is critical that we as educators teach our students how to evaluate web content. There are some great resource...
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Priming the 'Research Imagination' and How Critical is Too Critical?

 

As educators, we must effectively verbalize why the research projects we assign, and the associated lessons, are so vital to a useful education. Arjun Appadurai's 2006 article "The Right to Research" in the Globalisation, Societies and Education journal argues "that it is worth regarding research as a right, albeit of a special kind" (Appadurai, 2006, p. 167). He has an interesting perspective with regard to ownership of research and the common man's capacity, as well as prerogative, to carry out 'disciplined inquiries' that push our knowledge boundaries. He cites four reasons for taking this stance: a) destabilization of secure knowledge niches in an age of rapid change, b) lost reliance on traditional, customary or local sources of knowledge, c) loss of security that makes rumor, fiction, propaganda, anecdote virtually impossible to distinguish from knowledge, facts, news, trends, and finally, d) recognition of the latter is vital "for the exercise of informed citizenship" (p. 168). 

 

Furthermore, Appadurai outlines a knowledge hierarchy of sorts with the top 20% being the only members privileged with career options and a capacity for meta-knowledge about high-end scholarship that he calls the "global elite" (p. 168). However, Appadurai's argument is built around the approximately 1.5 billion people in the world who fall within the "global knowledge societies" but whose membership within is insecure because of "partial education, inadequate social capital, poor connectivity, political weakness and economic insecurity" (p. 168). He believes this group should claim its right to "the tools through which any citizen can systematically increase that stock of knowledge which they consider most vital to their survival as human beings and to their claims as citizens" (p. 168). Essentially, Appadurai attempts to establish a clear need to deparochialize the very idea of research and argues for regular people to claim their democratic right to citizenship by gaining "strategic knowledge". 

 

For these reasons, it is critical that our students know how to evaluate web content effectively, but also learn to enjoy the exploration and process of discernment. They need to establish their own systematic approach to gathering evidence from the multitude of websites that appear in searches but that proliferate nonsense. For instance, "Kathy Schrock's Five W's of Website Evaluation" or "The University of Southern Maine's Checklist for Evaluating Websites" on Teachbytes cannot be automatically considered a research safe-zone simply because it appears to be associated with a university or because it is posted on a content curation site (i.e. Scoop.it). To be truly discerning and remain within the top percentile of "global knowledge societies", one must question everything but not summarily eliminate sources based on a single grammar usage issue (like W’s). In fact, Appadurai's article may be overlooked completely by some western thinkers simply because of the spelling of "Globalisation" which is part of the journal’s title. A great deal relies on what individual citizens believe should be considered, as Appadurai put it, vital to their survival as human beings.

 

Appadurai, A. (2006). The right to research. Globalization, societies and education. 4(2) pp. 167-177. Online: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.

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Academic Language and Literacy Development - Standards Assessment & Instruction

Academic Language and Literacy Development - Standards Assessment & Instruction | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it

CORE Collaboration Central – This page contains information and resources related to the CORE 2013 Summer Symposium focused on Academic Language and Literacy Development, and its key implications for CCSS implementation.

Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Time and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for K-12 Classrooms


The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for K-12 classrooms are receiving appropriate opposition on multiple fronts, but significant issues were and continue to be ignored only exacerbating the problem of mobilizing yet another initiative to improve our schools. Motoko Rich's article, "School Standards' Debut Is Rocky, and Critics Pounce" in the Education section of The New York Times on August 15th, 2013, adeptly outlines the various areas of dispute throughout the country, but omits a few critical ones.  For instance, time for more content specific instruction, student learning, lesson and curriculum planning and student support/tutoring. As diversity in learning-styles and needs increase particularly in mainstream classrooms, which is certainly the trend in the United States, teachers will be expected to bridge the learning gap, and good teachers will feel the obligation to their core [pardon the pun]. 

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Lisa Purvin Oliner's comment, August 21, 2013 8:20 AM
Hi, Mike, take serious look at your entry page search request. 1st impressions count. Frankly, I worry about doing the same in my posts because English teachers are supposedly perfect [smirk].
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Stephen Ritz: A teacher growing green in the South Bronx | Video on TED.com

A whirlwind of energy and ideas, Stephen Ritz is a teacher in New York's tough South Bronx, where he and his kids grow lush gardens for food, greenery -- and jobs.
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Why We Must Teach with Creativity and Imagination

 

Look at what a healthy imagination did for this teacher and his students. Did you know you could grow a garden on a wall in your classroom? This proves we are limited only by the scope of our creative worlds.

 

While teaching the urban poor, Stephen wanted to find a way to bring the outdoors indoors because his students were not as healthy as they should be. Working with a local supplier, he created an edible garden on the wall of his classroom.

 

Sixth grade students were arriving early and staying late in order to care for their garden. Soon after, they went on a class trip to Manhattan and installed indoor garden walls in high rises and other locations, and began getting paid for their work.

 

This story strengthens the argument that teachers need to do more than follow a prescribed curriculum, especially one that is drained of creativity and imagination for the sake of high-stakes testing. Funding should not be dependent on myopic testing.

 

"Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere." Carl Sagan

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Facebook Debuts New Anti-Bullying Features

Facebook Debuts New Anti-Bullying Features | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
A child psychologist has worked with Facebook to create new message screens and options in Facebook to help young teens sort through their emotions and resolve issues on Facebook.
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Facebook Interface Adjustment to Mediate Bullying: Tempered Responses, Personal Intelligence, EQ and IQ in Character Analysis / Ethics Development

 

For those teachers who need a good non-fiction article for state test preparation, or for those interested in stimulating discussion to strengthen a small learning community, Marc Brackett introduces the reader here to Facebook's interface-adjustment project while simultaneously addressing the issue of emotional intelligence in teens. He points out that many young people have neither "the skills to have effective conversations about the difficult topic of bullying", nor the "problem solving" decision-making skills to temper their reactions and defend themselves in measured ways. 

 

Perhaps more importantly, the article refers to one teen in a focus group that could articulate his thoughts well enough to become a leader in that sample. While other students may not envision themselves in Charlie Sherman's shoes, by example, he may represent hope for either their singular or collective future(s). Nevertheless, the association may enhance their 'personal intelligence' (PI) that “entails the capacity to understand oneself, to appreciate feelings, fears and motivations (Smith, 2008; Gardner, 1999).

 

Furthermore, the article represents an opportunity for teachers to discuss student behavior in an indirect way. For instance, when discussing character development in literature, I had success using the emotional quotient (EQ) (Goleman, 1995; Bar-On, 2005) and intelligence quotient (IQ) (Stern, 1912) to teach students how to detect 'coming of age' behavior and metacognition in the climax/epiphany of short stories. When young people begin to recognize immature behavior in characters, they often see the same in their own. This lesson creates the conduit required to get students to 'make connections' between fictional personalities and their own, but in a way that does not belittle or waste precious learning time. 

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Learning Theory - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory - What are the established learning theories? | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
This Concept Map, created with IHMC CmapTools, has information related to: Learning Theory, zone of proximal development The area of capabilities that learners can exhibit with support from a teacher., Montessori constructivism, Lave & Wenger...
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Infographic of Learning Theories Provides Foundation for Teacher Reflection

 

If we want new or early service teachers to reflect on their own practices knowledgeably, this educational ‘infographic’ on learning theory could be helpful. This need for assistance has little to do with the inadequacies of teacher education and professional development programs; the issue has more to do with how much can be retained, especially in rigorous and fast-paced programs (like those provided at the University of Massachusetts Amherst). If we believe in reflection on one's teaching practice as the single most important avenue to excellence in the field, experience itself must have enough depth for there to be a usable foundation for theoretical and philosophical possibilities to be considered.

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Multiple Intelligences Apps for The iPad ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Multiple Intelligences Apps for The iPad ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Tolisano's Infographic for Apps, Multiple Intelligences & GloballyConnectedLearning

 

For me, Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano's 'infographic' of apps for iPad (or the Mac) organized in terms of multiple intelligences (Gardner, 1983) is fun to consider, and introduced me to a few new ones. 

 

Interestingly, in a recent article "The 30th anniversary introduction to Frames of Mind (his re-released book on the subject), Prof. Gardner talks about this being the time to revisit the relationship between general and particular intelligences and encourages researchers to "detail the differences between those who deploy a focused laser intelligence and those who display an ever-vigilant and shifting searchlight intelligence" (Gardner, 2011, p. 11). Tolisano's infographic for GloballyConnectedLearning taken as a whole represents the "shifting searchlight" and the individual lines the "focused laser intelligence" (p. 11). 

 

In the 90s when I first introduced this way of thinking about intelligences and learning-styles to my students for character analysis, they would claim they could not do a particular task because it was not one of their intelligences. Would it not be an interesting exercise to ask students to look at their own 'gifts' by checking off the apps they use? Unfortunately, for secondary-level students, this activity cannot be used unless everyone has access to the technology, but it could model Gardner's framework for student teachers who are more likely to have access. This viewpoint is important for lesson planning because activities applied to meet a stated objective need to be varied to be more equitable and to engage those students who have been previously disengaged. 

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Here's How Kate Spade, Juicy Couture And Lucky Brand Are Plotting To Win The Retail Revolution

Here's How Kate Spade, Juicy Couture And Lucky Brand Are Plotting To Win The Retail Revolution | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
Granting your every wish.
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Lessons for Bill McComb's Article on Technology and Future Malls:

"Here's How Kate Spade, Juicy Couture And Lucky Brand Are Plotting To Win The Retail Revolution"

 

If you want to empower students, inspire them through school-to-career connections. This article shows students the global marketplace they will enter as well as helps them engage with non-fiction articles. This is one of many ways to inspire students to read with purpose and to form opinions on real-world issues that are often the focus of writing prompts on U.S. state tests (like MCAS & CAPT). Selected articles may not be of interest to all so a) have students look for specific information (like business skill-sets) embedded in the article and b) vary article topics over time. 

 

For our business, this means digital look books assembled by an associate specifically for their clientele.  It can also mean targeted emails with highly personalized selling ideas, and a much closer link between the sales professional and their clients. In other words, the store itself becomes an off-site, local marketing office for the corporate marketing team—activating the centrally managed database and employing store associates to use digital communications with their own clients in highly engaging, customized ways. (McComb, 2013)

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13 Reasons Your Brain Craves Infographics - Edudemic

13 Reasons Your Brain Craves Infographics - Edudemic | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
This is downright spooky. It's an interactive infographic all about why your brain craves infographics. Food for thought!
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

'Infographics' Defined

 

According to Juan Velasco, Graphics Editor of National Geographic, infographics are: 

 

1. visual explanations that help viewers more easily understand, find or do something;

2. tutorials that, when necessary, integrate words and pictures in a fluid, dynamic way; 

3. innovations that stands alone and are completely self-explanatory;

4. graphics/images that reveal information formerly hidden or submerged; 

5. representations that make possible a more consistent and faster understanding, and 

6. creations that are universally understandable.

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Welcome to Storyboard That – The FREE online storyboard creator for schools and businesses.

Welcome to Storyboard That – The FREE online storyboard creator for schools and businesses. | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
Storyboard That is a cutting edge Web 2.0 tool for rapidly creating amazing storyboards, no art skills needed. Great for business meetings and in the classroom for students to express their creativity.
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

A Free Online Storyboard Creator for the Classroom

 

Storyboards are useful in myriad ways in the high school classroom, particularly for pre-visualizing new characters or analyzing those in print-based texts and/or films. To get students to understand the importance of evidence, imagery may be tied to internally cited quotations from the literature at hand. 

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How we used the Four Resources Model - New Literacies

New Literacies - How we used the Four Resources Model
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Uses for Luke and Freebody's (1999) Four Resources Literacies Model

 

In today's world, the ability to be literate across a wide range of modalities sets students apart as educated and capable. This site provides ideas for integrating Luke and Freebody's (1999) code breaker, meaning maker, text user & text analyst frame into classroom practices using SMS, websites and games. Just be aware that there are misspelled words on at least two of the site's pages. Yes, facility with print-based text is and will likely always be privileged over other literacy skills. This does not change the fact that people savvy in the use of other 21st Century multiliteracies (like Scoop.it!) are capable of respect and positions of power in today's marketplace.

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22 Effective Ways To Use Twitter In The Classroom

22 Effective Ways To Use Twitter In The Classroom | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
You can actually use Twitter in the classroom with Bloom's Taxonomy thanks to this awesome table that details nearly two dozen different ways to integrate the pair!

Via Gust MEES, Jason R Levine
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Seriously– this is an opportunity to pick up the pace in your classrooms!

This table was built by TeachBytes and details 22 different ways to use Twitter in the classroom. All my advisees will recognize why I love that it's organized by Bloom’s Taxonomy 'objective verbs'. 

 

http://www.edudemic.com/2013/06/22-effective-ways-to-use-twitter-in-the-classroom-2/ via @edudemic

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Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 4, 2013 5:54 PM

Twitter and Bloom's! I'm very very happy right now.

davidconover's curator insight, July 9, 2013 10:59 PM

This is a great infographic to learn the multiple uses of Twitter for personal and student growth.

Elena Borge's curator insight, July 15, 2013 12:58 PM

Try to use Twitter in class #motivation #newways #challenge

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Oh No, Russia’s New Olympic Darling Skates to the Theme From Schindler’s List

Oh No, Russia’s New Olympic Darling Skates to the Theme From Schindler’s List | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
The star of Saturday’s team figure skating session was undoubtedly Julia Lipnitskaia, a young Russian who thrilled the crowd with her short program. “The diminutive 15-year-old Russian figure skater positioned herself to become the darling of the Sochi Games,” wrote Kevin Kaduk at Yahoo’s Olympics blog. “This Russian Teen Prodigy’s...
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

An International Historical Teachable Moment: Nonfiction Meets Necessary Themes in the Classics


15-year-old Yulia (Julia) Lipnitskaia is not just a sensation for Russians. Skated to my favorite piece by John Williams’ from Schindler’s List, her routine was undoubtedly the most stunning artistic and athletic feat I’ve witnessed since Nadia Comaneci. However, according to Slate’s Justin Peters, I should be, in fact, appalled by the diminishment of the message the music carried in Spielberg’s film through such commercialization. I would agree if Yulia’s routine were not so powerfully representative of the scope of intellect, strength, and depth of a young girl’s spirit. If she were less talented as an artist and athlete, I might wholeheartedly agree with Peters. 


Once the Olympic routine is made available to present in the secondary classroom, the article by Reporter Peters and others written on Steven Spielberg’s 1993 Holocaust drama Schindler’s List, as well as the pre-holocaust Yiddish folk song, “Oyfn Pripitchik” (translated as “In Front of the Fireplace”), could inform a deep and interesting discussion about themes that resonate across a great number of both fictional and non-fictional print-based texts and multimodal media forms. According to a commenter on the Slate article, Johanna Hecht, Spielberg’s movie actually included the words of the folk lullaby as the music tracks the path of the little girl in the red coat. Johanna even points out that the original song, “addressed by a Rabbi to kids learning to read, is sad as it acknowledges the sadness of Jewish life and struggle in the Old World, even before Hitler”. Hecht ends by saying, “For what it's worth, I thought Yulia's skate captured the poignancy of the music quite brilliantly”. Frankly, I was relieved someone else agreed with me because I did not want to appear hyperbolic. Anyway, whether in agreement or opposition, it is in this tension that I see a meaningful lesson that marries all five senses to the intellect of students.  


Finally, with the emphasis placed on nonfiction in many classrooms today, this lesson allows the objectives of Common Core and skills related to state mandated testing to continue to dominate the plan book while the seemingly lost virtues of the classroom may reemerge. As Lucy Calkins, Mary Ehrenworth, and Christopher Lehman, at Teachers Collegethe Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University, said, “As challenging as it must have been to write and finesse the adoption of the Common Core State Standards, that accomplishment is nothing compared to the work of teaching in ways that bring all students to these ambitious expectations. The goal is clear. The pathway is not.” It will take extreme creativity to inspire students to care to learn and to take a stand on both local and global issues that will have an effect on them in the future. Perhaps this international teachable moment, and others like it, will resurrect in the teachers’ repertoire lessons that inspire dialogue about that which is so fragile in human experience. It is this interplay of multiple modalities and real-world debate that allows ideologies and power struggles of students to become transparent. After all, why struggle to read and write if it has no purpose or passion behind it?


Does Yulia (Julia) Lipnitskaia's spirit strengthen the message of the John Williams' piece used in Schindler’s List, or does it diminish it? 


This entry is dedicated to Catalina M. Yang because her classroom insights reflect the concerns of the brightest, best, and self-motivated in our country’s public education system.


“Oh No, Russia’s New Olympic Darling Skates to the Theme From Schindler’s List” 

http://www.slate.com/blogs/five_ring_circus/2014/02/08/julia_lipnitskaia_sochi_olympics_why_do_figure_skaters_love_skating_to_the.html via @slate

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Words of Wisdom: 8 Famous Quotes to Help You Embrace Fear and Achieve Success

Words of Wisdom: 8 Famous Quotes to Help You Embrace Fear and Achieve Success | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
When offering career advice to young professionals and entrepreneurs, the two things that always top my list are to find a mentor and to read voraciously. Throughout the course of my life, I have
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Begin the School Year with Appropriate Discussion and Journal Prompts While Giving Everyone a Voice 

 

Anthony Scaramucci, Managing Partner at SkyBridge Capita, offered this advice to young professionals and entrepreneurs on LinkedIn.com. His list of quotations provide good journal writing prompts and conversation starters for orienting new students to you and to your classroom. There could be different aphorisms displayed each day until you become overwhelmed by the objectives of your course. If you are working with teens, there should always be more than one prompt available to block disgruntled participants from derailing your plans.

 

However, for Scaramucci's list of quotations to be ideal, there should be authors included that represent a cross-section of the students in your classroom(s). To reflect the ideological clarity (Bartolomé, 1994) necessary to be inclusive and to engender full participation, sayings exclusively from white males may become an equity issue. 

 

For a quick and equitable list of famous quotations from movies, Shannon Doyne and Katherine Schulten, both writers for the Learning Network: Teaching & Learning for The New York Times, provide a ready-made handout, as well as an entire lesson for interpreting famous lines. 

 

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/22/rounding-up-the-usual-suspects-interpreting-famous-quotations/?_r=0,

 

Before running headlong into this lesson, regardless of how well considered and comprehensive, try first using several of the lines as journal prompts to initiate classes at the onset of the year, as suggested above. They will provide critical information on students' general knowledge, capabilities and interests. When students share their responses, the learning community will bond as long as the perimeters of discussion are clear from the onset. 

 

Hippocrates: Life is short, art is long, opportunity fleeting, experimenting dangerous, reasoning difficult.

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Major Players in the MOOC Universe

Major Players in the MOOC Universe | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
Explore connections among the industry's major players.
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Should Education Ever be Flat in a World of Difference?

 

According to Edutopia's Education Trends blogger and educator Matt Levinson, where MOOCs 'Miss the Mark' is in the student-teacher relationship because great teachers inspire through their passion for the subject and their ability to communicate and connect with students in face-to-face interactions and relationships. Where Matt's point rings most true is in an effective teacher's ability to differentiate instruction. This is particularly pertinent as education's global reach crosses cultural perspectives and prior knowledge is left an unknown and insignificant variable when it should drive instruction.

 

Thomas Friedman celebrates the power of the MOOC by writing that "Nothing has more potential to lift more people out of poverty -- by providing them an affordable education to get a job or improve in the job they have. Nothing has more potential to unlock a billion more brains to solve the world's biggest problems." While the ubiquity and massiveness of open online courses may be 'flattening' the education world, it may be preventing the natural expression of difference to drive lesson planning. This may be why, according to The New York Times, "Less than 10 percent of MOOC students finish the courses they sign up for on their own." 

 

Don't miss the online education chronology:

Online Education (MOOCs) - The New York Times

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Debi's curator insight, September 27, 2013 6:50 PM

Ahhhh.....commonsense prevails!

Lisa Purvin Oliner's comment, September 28, 2013 8:17 AM
No, thank you! BTW, is it ethical to generate and encourage the MOOC approach when money trumps learning value?
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Why I Flip-Flopped on the Flipped Classroom

Why I Flip-Flopped on the Flipped Classroom | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
A Canadian educator reveals why she fell in — and out of — of love with the flipped classroom model of instruction.
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Transformative Teaching and Learning: Flip-Flopping the Classroom, Experimentation, and Attribution (Re)Training

 

There is no definitive formula for effective teaching that fits every classroom/small learning community, but teachers willing to try new techniques and strategies are among those most likely to find the best fit. Furthermore, teachers willing to experiment with new ideas and to change their minds when field-testing does not produce desired results may remain effective in the classroom and be satisfied with the profession longer than those who grow rigid. 

 

Shelley Wright's article models this key trait. She experimented with the 'Flipped Classroom' model thinking it would serve as a "stepping stone to a fully realized inquiry- or project-based learning environment", but admits that a year and a half later it did not produce the "transformative learning experience" she hoped it would.

 

Later in her article, Wright points out that there are essentially three 'fundamental questions' driving her teaching and learning experience, and she lists the following requisites:

What are you going to learn?How are you going to learn it?How are you going to show your learning?

I found her list particularly interesting because it is the same taught in most teacher education methods classes, (at least since the early 90s) but 'you' takes the place of 'the student will'. I point this out because the change in parts of speech reflects the move from teacher directed to student directed, or situated to project-based, learning and thinking. 

 

Furthermore, for classrooms behind in the use of student directed learning, the employment of 'you' is critical for "attributional retraining" (AR) (Heider, 1958; Weiner, 1986). If our work as teachers results in students believing to their core that their success is dependent on their own efforts (and the methods they choose to employ), not the teacher's, then that 'transformative learning' for which Shelley Wright was aiming is more readily attainable.

 

For more on attributional retraining, I found a thorough explanation on the National College Transition Network's website. Please note that Kallenbach and Zafft are careful to point out that there are some legitimate external factors attributed to academic success, but AR is about "helping students identify ways in which they can improve their academic performance in spite of external factors". I also have a slideshow you are free to use at lisa.oliner.net.

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Startup Revolution

Startup Revolution | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

The Startup Revolution: How to Host a Scoop.it Newsletter Landing Page

 

I've been looking for an avenue to publish student work in a way that does not sap critical energy and time from the learning requirements and obligations of the mainstream, inclusive English classroom and think there may be something in the "new Newsletter feature" using "The Free Alternative" that may be useful in this regard. Martin Smith points out that "You might find that business is limited in scale", but with high school students (and even undergraduates), their first language is social media, and their facility with these venues may act as a free advertising campaign and eliminate the issue. 

 

It's critical to inspire action in the classroom and publication of student work grants them an agency that may keep them working toward a meaningful academic goal. However, the teacher (or professor) needs to know the restrictions on content and ownership laws before boring headlong into this innovative 'multilingual' solution. Nevertheless, modeling the "Startup" and what is "revolutionary" about it is truly empowering. 

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TED Weekends: The best TED talk videos and blog posts on Huffington Post

TED Weekends: The best TED talk videos and blog posts on Huffington Post | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
Explore this week's idea on #TEDWeekends on The Huffington Post and help it grow. Because ideas aren't set in stone. When exposed to thoughtful people, discussed and reacted to, they morph into an even more potent form.
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

A Teacher's Perspective on "The 'Art' of Life and Death", an interactive public art project, on TED WEEKENDS 

 

The title, "What do you want to do before you die?", and related subject matter may appear morbid at first, but it is actually quite uplifting and inspirational with the right twist-of-the-mind. This story may be used best at the secondary or tertiary level with two purposes in mind, 1) to illustrate how small ideas, especially inspired from the heart, can turn into meaningful global projects, and 2) to remind the viewer/participant that hope resides in our unity and commonality not in our singularity. The artist or innovator (I'm not certain how she sees herself) Candy Chang reminds us that "Everyone you're standing with in line and everyone you're sitting by in a cafe and everyone you walk past on the street is going through challenges" in their lives.

 

This amazing interactive public art project confirms for me that when people share their views on life, and death in this case, something edifying and life-affirming often results. This is a point I intend to capitalize upon through my current research project that emphasizes literary analysis, an art that may get lost in a public education system that presently emphasizes non-fiction over fiction in high-stakes testing. "Our public spaces are our shared spaces and at their greatest they can nourish our well-being and help us make sense of our communities and ourselves" (Chang, 2013). There may be no more important message to deliver to our youth: they can make a difference in their communities and beyond simply by recognizing our common suffering and our power to make a change in simple ways.

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Google Image Result for http://multiliteracyrevolution.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/picture-6-tkr9k7.png

Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

More on Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences & Diversity of Learning-styles

 

The multiple intelligences concept is not simply critical for lesson planning when activities must embrace the plurality of learning-styles in the classroom, but they are also a great way to get students to analyze characters in fiction. Furthermore, it reminds us that bi- and multi-lingualism is an additional smartness, a gift that must not be viewed as a deficit as some do in the English Language/Arts classroom. In fact, giftedness is often ignored in the classroom, and what is actually boredom may be misidentified as antisocial or mischievous behavior.

 

Howard Gardner viewed intelligence as 'the capacity to solve problems or to fashion products that are valued in one or more cultural setting[s]' (Gardner & Hatch, 1989). Gardner initially formulated a provisional list of seven intelligences: linguistic intelligence, logical-mathematical, musical, bodily-kinesthetic, spatial, interpersonal and intrapersonal. The first two were valued most in schools; the next three were typically associated with the arts; and the final two were what he called 'personal intelligences'. (Gardner, 1999)

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On GPAs and Brainteasers: New Insights From Google On Recruiting and Hiring

On GPAs and Brainteasers: New Insights From Google On Recruiting and Hiring | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
“We found that brainteasers are a complete waste of time. How many golf balls can you fit into an airplane? How many gas stations in Manhattan? A complete waste of time. They don’t
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Google's SVP Laszlo Bock on Recruiting and Hiring: The Behavior Interview

 

Google's Senior Vice President Laszlo Bock says "behavior interviews" provide both "valuable 'meta' information" about what the candidate considers difficult, and how the interviewee deals with real-world issues. GPAs and test scores do not predict anything about whether they will be successful in their jobs in the long run. Furthermore, good leaders are consistent and fair. 

 

Why is this important to inclusivity? It tells teachers that grades do not predict later success in the world so emphasis on points and test scores does not produce "enduring value" (Wiggins & McTighe, 1998); however, nurturing and capitalizing on specialized propensities and talents in every student may. It also means that their fairness and consistency in classroom process and focus models valuable leadership qualities for students. 

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Education 2.0 Vs Education 3.0- Awesome Chart ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Education 2.0 Vs Education 3.0- Awesome Chart ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

I think there are problems trying to reduce teaching and learning to simple terms, especially in a country that is experiencing shifting cultural contexts, but there are some good points made.

 

"We have been educated in a 1.0 education model, we are teaching in a 2.0 model but our students are living in a 3.0 model. These three models chronicle the major paradigmatic shifts that education has witnessed over the last century."  

 

This infographic was designed by John W. Moravec http://www.educationfutures.com/masthead/john/

 

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How To Use Pinterest With Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic

How To Use Pinterest With Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
It's actually quite easy to figure out how to use popular social bookmarking service Pinterest with Bloom's Taxonomy. That is, after you see this guide!
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

When planning a lesson for high school students, especially those gifted with multilingualism, use of social media sites (like Scoop.it!, Twitter and Pinterest) combined with verb-rich objectives make learning both accessible and empowering. However, use of these affordances are meaningless if objectives are vague, disconnected from necessary learning outcomes and/or do not provide measurable results. 

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Framework for 21st Century Learning - The Partnership for 21st Century Skills

Framework for 21st Century Learning - The Partnership for 21st Century Skills | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it

The Framework presents a holistic view of 21st century teaching and learning that combines a discrete focus on 21st century student outcomes (a blending of specific skills, content knowledge, expertise and literacies) with innovative support systems to help students master the multi-dimensional abilities required of them in the 21st century.


Via Nik Peachey, Jason R Levine
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Because these broader concepts are only helpful for big-picture considerations, challenging student teachers to brainstorm the subordinate concepts might make this visual more meaningful and even useful. For instance, what lessons teach critical thinking skills in the English/Language Arts classroom? 

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Nalya Ovshieva's comment, June 27, 2013 6:04 AM
The overview of 21st Century Learning focuses on student mastery of 21st century skills indispensable to succeeding in work and life in the 21st century.
Ness Crouch's curator insight, July 4, 2013 5:48 PM

This is an excellent summary of 21st Century learning!

Selin Gelinci's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:40 AM

This is a useful resource as  it explores further into the framework for the 21st century learning. It combines a discrete focus on the outcomes, specific skillsa and content knowledge that should be gained through the learning program. The diagram helps understanding further into the support system and how it all collaborates. This is benefical to me as a future teacher as it gives me a clear understanding of how i can manage my time effectively and make sure i am always covering aspects that are relevant to the 21st century learning.

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Prepositions Made Easy: In, On, and At

Prepositions Made Easy: In, On, and At | Teaching Techniques for Inclusivity | Scoop.it
Are prepositions really so difficult? What if I told you that IN JUST 5 MINUTES I could help you solve some of your most confusing preposition problems?

Via Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat, Jason R Levine
Lisa Purvin Oliner's insight:

Always reinforce your words with clear visuals and other modalities. This diagram can be broken down in a PowerPoint by your students; then they can teach peers what it illustrates. Encourage them to use available design to reinforce their lessons. [See: Cope & Kalantzis (New London Group), 1996]

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ESL Academy's curator insight, June 18, 2013 10:47 AM

Nice!

Ana Sclerandi's curator insight, June 21, 2013 9:55 PM

A very useful inverted pyramid to quickly understand and learn prepositions of time and place. 

Tony Gough's curator insight, June 27, 2013 8:23 AM

Prepositions and how to use them!