Teaching Sustainability for Stage 3
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Sustainable energy sources | Global Education

Sustainable energy sources | Global Education | Teaching Sustainability for Stage 3 | Scoop.it
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Please refer to Activity 2 – Energy use and access around the world

 

This ‘Global Education’ resource for teachers provides a variety of activities that introduce a global perspective on various HSIE topics, including, on sustainable energy resources and the implications of human impact on the environment. In particular, Activity 2: Energy use and access around the world is a great activity that focuses on how various people around the world meet their energy needs.

 

“Comparative pictures depicting a range of sustainability issues to evoke different perceptions for different individuals” (Shields & Hoggard, 2013, p. 135). This statement reflects the importance of providing students with resources from a variety of global contexts. The first task asks students to examine two photos that demonstrate the use of a traditional fuel. The photos support students in their understanding of global contexts. This task creates a platform for students to discuss how and why different countries or people vary in their energy use. 

 

A table titled ‘Energy and the Environment’ can be shown to the class, which outlines various types of energy use in comparison with the respective countries population. The website suggests that students in groups, create a short profile for each country using the table for statistical information. Following this, students are to investigate the different energy sources used in the country. The final task, asks students to analyse the information and critically think about the country’s impact on the environment and how they might ensure they use energy in a sustainable manner in the future. Activity 2 relates directly to the HSIE Stage 3 syllabus outcome: ENS3.5 – Demonstrates an understanding of the interconnectedness between Australia and global environments and how individuals and groups can act in an ecologically responsible manner. For example, the table provides a comparison between Australia and a variety of surrounding countries. In turn, allowing students to understand the interconnectedness of Australia and other countries use of energy and its impact on global environments.  

 

 

References.

 

Global Education. (2014). Sustainable Energy Sources. [online] Retrieved April 3, 2014, from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/teaching-activity/sustainable-energy-sources-up.html

 

NSW Board of Studies. (2006). HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.  [online] Retrieved April 3, 2014, from

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/93415130-2afa-4654-a740-cf3d399d2627/k6_hsie_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

 

Shields, K., & Hoggard, L. (2013). Sustainability for Educators. New South Wales: Byron Region Community College. Australia.

 

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Windmill Game | Ecogamer.org | Ecogamer.ORG

Windmill Game | Ecogamer.org | Ecogamer.ORG | Teaching Sustainability for Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Windmill game where you have to build windmills in strategic locations. Windfall is a windmill game with NIMBYism at the core.
LuisaMasc's insight:

“Games have the potential to enhance student autonomy in learning” (Bobis, Mulligan & Lowrie, 2013, p. 313). This statement highlights the importance of using interactive games to challenge and engage students in the classroom. ‘Windfall’ is a strategic game that involves creating Windmill Farms that will create clean energy and profitability. In order to do well in the game, students must research suitable locations to place a windmill through an understanding of the land value and average wind speed.

 

“Children construct their own understanding through interaction with their environment” (McInerney & McInerney, 2010, p. 36). Teachers should reflect on their pedagogical approaches to lessons and ensure a student- centred learning environment is created. This is demonstrated, as ‘Windfall’ is a simulation game that allows students to actively construct and use knowledge in order to ‘succeed’ in the game. Students develop decision – making skills as they decide on the placement and size of the windmill. Further, the game simulates ‘protesters’ that disrupt the construction of windmills in certain areas. Consequently, students inadvertently learn and understand about the advantages and disadvantages of the placement of Windmill Farms. In addition, the game offers an in- game tutorial on how to play and three levels to choose from – easy, medium and hard. This places the responsibility on the students to adopt the level of difficulty they would like to play at. Teachers should be aware and proactive in discussing Internet safety with students prior to introducing the game. This can be done through adopting a holistic approach to cyber safety, more information and assistance can be found at www.cybersmart.gov.au.

 

References.

 

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J., and Lowrie, T. (2013). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.

 

Ecogamer. Environmental Games – Windfall. [online] Retrieved March 29, 2014, from http://ecogamer.org/environmental-games/windmill-game

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson Education Australia. Ch 2.

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Shining a Light on Sustainability

Shining a Light on Sustainability | Teaching Sustainability for Stage 3 | Scoop.it
LuisaMasc's insight:

The Australian Institute for Environment Sustainability (ARIES) YouTube video is an appropriate resource for educating HSIE Stage 3 students about sustainability of environments.  

 

Winch (2010) states “ICT is a powerful tool in the classroom because it can ignite the imagination and bridge the global divide” (p. 400). This statement exemplifies the importance of electronic texts in enhancing students’ understanding of information. This is through its ability to engage students with its multimodal features such as colour, visual design, animation, music and video. For example, the use of this YouTube video resource facilitates student learning of the notion of sustainability and sustainable initiatives.

 

The ARIES YouTube video is a valuable digital resource that could be used as an introduction to the theme of sustainability. “Teachers should make a conscious effort to find out what students’ informal knowledge is before teaching new concepts” (McInerney & McInerney, 2010, p. 105). This statement emphasises that teachers should consider students’ prior knowledge of sustainability before viewing the video. Using a mind map, a teacher could pose the focus question ‘What is Sustainability’ to facilitate a class discussion and assess prior knowledge. The video presents a variety of sustainability initiatives. 

 

The Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) have produced a Sustainability priority. This priority emphasises that students are to “act sustainably as individuals and to participate in collective endeavours that are shared across local, regional and global communities” (ACARA, 2014, para. 19). As students are in Stage 3 it is important that they are able to think critically on ways in which they can act in a sustainable manner. Building on student’s understandings from the video, in groups of 4, instruct students to consider ways in which they can act in a sustainable manner in their own home. For example, recycling appropriately. Using the discussion in groups, students are to individually reflect and write one thing they promise to do at home that will ensure they act in an ecologically sustainable manner. These will be displayed in the classroom as a reminder of the students’ individual promises.

 

 

References.

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authroity. (2014). Cross - Curriculum Priorities. [online] Retrieved March 30, 2014, from http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/cross_curriculum_priorities.html

 

Australian Institute for Environment Sustainability. (2014). Shining a Light on Sustainability. [online] Retrieved March 26, 2014, from http://aries.mq.edu.au/videos/shining-a-light/

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading writing and children’s literature (4th ed.) South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

 

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More Stories from the Billabong - James Vance Marshall and Francis Firebrace

More Stories from the Billabong - James Vance Marshall and Francis Firebrace | Teaching Sustainability for Stage 3 | Scoop.it
LuisaMasc's insight:

‘More Stories from the Billabong’, retold by James Vance Marshall and illustrated by Francis Firebrace was first published in 2013. This is a rich and engaging book that sheds light on a variety of dreamtime stories that are important for Stage 3 students to reflect upon. Particularly, ‘How the Great Fish Goodoo Created the Murray River’. This dreamtime story describes the creation of the Murray River from the perspective of the Yorta Yorta people. Further, it discusses on the following pages, the importance of preserving the river and its flora and fauna, such as the Murray cod (which are in danger of extinction). This is highlighted in the assertion, “Aboriginal people, who believe that the world we live in should be cared for rather than exploited” (Marshall & Firebrace, 2013, p. 59).

 

It is imperative as teachers to approach texts with a ‘critical eye’. This allows students the opportunity to be exposed to texts with a variety of perspectives, values and cultural views. “Providing children with culturally appropriate literature is one way to help them achieve a sense of identity” (What to Look For When Selecting Books, 2009, para. 14). Moreover, students are able to, “develop deeper concepts of the construction of culture” (Browett, 2009, para. 5).

 

The Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide (2003) is a valuable tool in assessing and evaluating resources with a ‘critical eye’. It focuses on authenticity, accuracy, balance, participation and support, and exclusion and omission. “It is important that materials and resources recognise contemporary Aboriginal input” (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003, p. 15). ‘More Stories from the Billabong’ complies with this recommendation as James Vance Marshall and Francis Firebrace (2013) have thanked several people for their contributions to this text, including June Baker of the Yorta Yorta people. In addition, Francis Firebrace, of the Yorta Yorta people, illustrated this book.  The resource ‘More Stories from the Billabong’ provides Aboriginal word meanings in the form of a glossary and a page dedicated to the aboriginal symbols and their meanings used throughout the text.

 

Gilbert & Hoepper (2011) emphasise the importance of “genuine dialogue between Indigenous members of the school community and teaching staff” (p. 400). In conjunction with the Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide (2003), teachers should contact the Aboriginal Education Consultative Group. This allows teachers to consult with their respective Aboriginal community on appropriate use of resources in the classroom and advice on how to teach particular aspects of Aboriginal culture.  ‘More Stories from the Billabong’ demonstrates the collaboration between Indigenous and non- Indigenous Australians. As this text was published in 2013, following the apology in 2008. This text invites students of a Stage 3 classroom to appreciate and recognise the relationship between Indigenous and non- indigenous Australians in our shared history. 

 

 

References.

 

Browett, J. (2009). Critical Literacy and Visual Texts: Windows on Culture, Retrieved April 3, 2014, from http://www.education.tas.gov.au/curriculum/standards/english/english/teachers/discussion/browett

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning. 

 

Marshall, J.V., & Firebrace, F. (2013). More From The Billabong. Sydney: Walker Books. Australia.

 

New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003) Aboriginal Education K-12 : Resource Guide. Sydney: Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate NSW DET.

 

Talk Story, Sharing Stories, Sharing Culture. (2009). What to Look For When Selecting Books. Retrieved April 3, 2014, from http://www.talkstorytogether.org/american-indian/alaskan-native-book-list/guide-selecting-books-and-sources-current-reviews/what-look

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Case Study: Wind farm on King Island, Tasmania?

Case Study: Wind farm on King Island, Tasmania? | Teaching Sustainability for Stage 3 | Scoop.it
Discover some of the issues surrounding a plan to build Australia's biggest wind farm on King Island, near Tasmania....
LuisaMasc's insight:

Windmill Farms are ecologically sustainable developments that diminish pollution generated by fossil fuels such as, coal, oil and gas. Splash ABC provides teachers with a rich and accessible digital resource. When used in the classroom, the resource provides students with a case study on a Wind Farm development in King Island, Tasmania in the form of a video.

 

The resource enables teachers to use the side panel ‘Things to think about’ to facilitate and guide a lesson on the case study.  Prior to showing students the video, students could participate in a ‘think – pair – share’ activity. Ask students to discuss in pairs, ‘What is a windmill farm?’, ‘How does a windmill farm produce energy?’ and ‘What is a renewable resource?’. To encourage students to listen actively throughout the video, provide students with a structured template that outlines aspects to ‘listen out’ for in the video. These can include, the benefits of building a windmill farm on King Island and any environmental concerns.

 

“Critical literacy enables students to open up dominant discourses to different interpretations, and to revise texts to incorporate other perspectives” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 162). It is imperative that teachers provide students with the opportunity to think independently and construct their own opinions on topics. Using the video as a foundation, students are to individually research issues surrounding other wind farms in Australia and the world. To extend on this activity, teachers can ask students to construct an exposition based on the knowledge gained from the video and their research. Students need to be able to give reasons for their point of view of windmill farms and ensure they use persuasive language throughout the exposition. The exposition will be collected as a work sample for a formative assessment to fulfil the HSIE NSW Syllabus outcome ENS3.5 – ‘Demonstrates an understanding of the interconnectedness between Australia and global environments and how individuals and groups can act in an ecologically responsible manner’ and the English Australian Curriculum outcome EN3-2A – ‘composes, edits and presents well-structured and coherent texts’. 

 

References:

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). The Australian Curriculum v6.0 English: Content structure. [online] Retrieved March 28, 2014, from http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/cross_curriculum_priorities.html

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

NSW Board of Studies. (2006). HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.  [online] Retrieved March 28, 2014, from

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/93415130-2afa-4654-a740-cf3d399d2627/k6_hsie_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

Splash ABC. (2014). Wind Farm on King Island Tasmania. [online] Retrieved March 28, 2014, from http://splash.abc.net.au/media/-/m/525885/wind-farm-on-king-island-tasmania-

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