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Is Grade Integrity a Fairness Issue? | Inside Higher Ed

Is Grade Integrity a Fairness Issue? | Inside Higher Ed | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

A few weeks ago I received a survey invitation through an association listserve asking for information on faculty experiences with and responses to student requests for special treatment. Beyond a raw request for a grade change, many other types of request would affectgrades: requests for extra credit, do-overs, late submissions, and so on that are outside of stated course policy.  Some survey questions asked about institutional attitudes toward offering/denying student requests.

 
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Teaching strategies for the college classroom
Articles and resources to help college faculty improve their teaching and stay current on the latest pedagogical challenges and trends for the face-to-face, online, blended, and flipped classroom.
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Why Flipped Classrooms Fail

Why Flipped Classrooms Fail | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

“I tried Peer Instruction and it didn’t work.”   As a champion of the popular flipped learning method developed by Eric Mazur , this phrase always hits me hard when I hear it from fellow educators. And I do hear it. 

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Concrete ways faculty can work with other colleagues to improve their teaching (essay)

Concrete ways faculty can work with other colleagues to improve their teaching (essay) | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

College and university faculty members should work with mentors, coaches and colleagues to continually reflect on their own practice of teaching.

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Making the Most of ‘Reporting Out’ after Group Work 

Making the Most of ‘Reporting Out’ after Group Work  | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Too often the debriefing aspect of a group work activity fails to deepen the learning. Here are a few ideas to engage students in more meaningful debriefs. 

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Study traces characteristics of undergraduate education to key measures of success in life

Study traces characteristics of undergraduate education to key measures of success in life | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Study links certain traits of undergraduate education to success in life: meaningful interaction with professors, studying a variety of fields outside the major and having classroom talks that go to issues of ethics and life.
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Improve Participation in College Classrooms: How to Create a Discussion Strategy that Will Increase Student Learning and Engagement

Improve Participation in College Classrooms: How to Create a Discussion Strategy that Will Increase Student Learning and Engagement | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Discussion promotes learning and helps develop of critical thinking skills. As such, discussion should be used as a primary teaching strategy in college and university classrooms.

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Research: College Students More Distracted Than Ever -- Campus Technology

Research: College Students More Distracted Than Ever -- Campus Technology | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
A study published in the Journal of Media Education this week reported that students spend a fifth of their time in class doing things on their devices that have nothing to do with their school work.
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Broadening Pedagogical Knowledge by Learning from Other Disciplines - Faculty Focus

Broadening Pedagogical Knowledge by Learning from Other Disciplines - Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
What and how we teach are linked, but there are other connections as well, and those connections aren’t all unique to our disciplines.
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The magic pill of online teaching?

The magic pill of online teaching? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
As a regular online instructor, I know how powerful online orientations can be.  In every one of my classes, I include a short video that walks students through the basic elements and features of my online classes.  I try to make the organization transparent for students and make it clear for them how to access…
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The Rhythms of the Semester: Implications for Practice

The Rhythms of the Semester: Implications for Practice | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

We recognize that in the march of the semester we begin on a different note than we end on. The early weeks hold promise and high hopes, both often curtailed when the first assignments are graded. The final weeks find us somewhere between being reluctant or relieved to see a class move on. There is an inexplicable but evident interaction between our teaching persona and the persona a class develops throughout a semester. 

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When Students Say They're Bored

When Students Say They're Bored | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

I hear from student that lots of things are boring – a course, an assignment, school in general – and when they say this I want to know why because boredom is a significant impediment to learning, the peak (or nadir) of non-engagement.

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Small Changes in Teaching: The First 5 Minutes of Class

Small Changes in Teaching: The First 5 Minutes of Class | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Four quick ways to shift students’ attention from life’s distractions to your course content.
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Four more ways to spark classroom discussions and keep students engaged

Four more ways to spark classroom discussions and keep students engaged | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Dr. Stephen Brookfield visited ACUE’s offices and answered questions about ways you can can keep students focused and engaged in meaningful classroom discussions

 

Students are most engaged in learning when they’re verbally interacting with course material, the professor, and their classmates, research shows. Yet pulling off a great classroom discussion that involves all students is such a complex and challenging topic that we’ve broken it down into two course modules: one focused on planning effective classroom discussions and another focused on facilitating them.

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Monday Morning Mentor

Monday Morning Mentor | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Each program in the Monday Morning Mentor series addresses an issue of current interest to faculty and will provide—in just 20 minutes—a solid foundation of classroom-tested techniques, research, and advice. 

 

Here are just a few of the titles we are featuring in our Spring 2016 schedule:

 

• How Do I Assign Students to Groups?

• How Do I Build Community in My Classroom?

• Is Your Syllabus Sending the Wrong Message?

• How Do I Get Students to Come to Class Prepared?

• What Key Factors Influence Test Performance?

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Class Discussion: From Blank Stares to True Engagement

Class Discussion: From Blank Stares to True Engagement | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Thirty years of research in the scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education have demonstrated that when students are engaged in the classroom, they learn more (Pascarella and Terezini 1991, 2005). Classroom discussion is likely the most commonly used strategy for actively engaging students. Whether it is a seminar course centered on discussion or a lecture punctuated by moments of interaction with students, discussion is likely second only to lecture as the most frequently used pedagogical strategy.

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Why Are We So Slow to Change the Way We Teach?

Why Are We So Slow to Change the Way We Teach? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Many aspects of teaching—lecture, course design, assignments, and grading—have changed little over the years. The question is, “Why?” 

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Blog: Flipped Learning: Utilising Flipped Assessment as a Teaching Assistant - TA Support

The inverted classroom model has become one of the most commonly discussed teaching methods in higher education. The inverted, or flipped, classroom can be defined as a pedagogical model that reverses the internal and the external structure of the classroom (Bart, 2014). More specifically, the flipped classroom reverses the traditional teaching method of lecture and homework. A “lecture” is completed prior to the allotted class time, and class time consists of knowledge application and clarification (Kachka, 2012). Ultimately, a flipped learning environment shifts the classroom focus from the instructor to the students (Spangler, 2015). In order to expand the teaching ideology of the flipped classroom model, researchers have suggested incorporating inverted assessment processes into their teaching models (e.g., Honeycutt & Garrett, 2014b; Talbert, 2015). Flipped assessment follows the structure of the flipped classroom, with the assessment process being student- rather than instructor-centered (Honeycutt & Garrett, 2014a). Although teaching assistants (TAs) are often not involved in the lectures undergraduate students attend, many TAs are responsible for holding tutorials.

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Ready to Flip: Three Ways to Hold Students Accountable for Pre-Class Work

Ready to Flip: Three Ways to Hold Students Accountable for Pre-Class Work | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
One of the biggest questions about the flipped classroom model is how to get students to actually do the pre-class work and come to class prepared.
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Thinking about Thinking

Thinking about Thinking | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

This past Tuesday, several faculty and staff members gathered for the semester’s first Conversations on Teaching, which focused on promoting reflective learning and metacognition for better student learning.

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Free 'Clickers' for All: Using Google Forms to Survey Your Students

Free 'Clickers' for All: Using Google Forms to Survey Your Students | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Using Google Forms as a free alternative to clickers, I am able to get a real-time assessment of student learning and attitudes. 
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How Curiosity Enhances Learning - InformED

How Curiosity Enhances Learning - InformED | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

When we talk about curiosity and learning, we tend to talk about it from an engagement perspective. If students remain interested in and curious about a topic, they will pay more attention and, ultimately, learn more. But this isn’t the whole story, and we’re doing ourselves a disservice by cutting it short.

 

It might seem obvious that curiosity and learning go hand-in-hand, but the scientific community sees it differently. Until very recently, there hasn’t been much published researched on how curiosity works in the brain. It’s a difficult phenomenon to describe, let alone study. But the latest neuroscience tells us that one mental process in particular benefits from curiosity, a process crucial to learning and education in general, and it just so happens to be the missing part of the conversation: memory.

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National Survey of AAC&U Member Chief Academic Officers (2015)

National Survey of AAC&U Member Chief Academic Officers (2015) | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

AC&U surveyed Chief Academic Officers at member institutions from July-October 2015 concerning priorities related to learning outcomes, assessment, general education design, high-impact practices, and data tracking and goal setting around equity and quality learning. With support from USA Funds, AAC&U conducted structured interviews with 14 of the respondents focusing on minority serving and predominately white institutions and particularly on those who were tracking data in at least some disaggregated ways.

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7 Keys to Competency-Based Faculty Development | Center for Digital Education

7 Keys to Competency-Based Faculty Development | Center for Digital Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
As more universities embrace competency-based education, some are looking at ways to offer a similar approach to faculty development.
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Becoming a Better Teacher: Articles for New and Not-So-New Faculty - Faculty Focus

Becoming a Better Teacher: Articles for New and Not-So-New Faculty - Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
The literature on teaching and learning can do a good job of shaping our broader thinking if it’s sampled across disciplines, topics, and categories.
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Sue Peterson's curator insight, January 14, 12:59 AM

I have saved all these articles and will be reading them this semester.  Great resources for multiple levels of teaching.

Philip Smith's curator insight, February 1, 9:16 AM

Possible sources for a faculty reading club. I like the idea of using a series of related articles instead of a book for some meetings.

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Students’ Opinions Instruction are In! Now What?

Sometimes there is a considerable difference between a professor’s evaluation of a course and those of the students. The divergence can work in either direction. Perhaps a “terrible” experience for the professor was “absolutely brilliant” for the students. Let’s be honest, however: the opposite situation is difficult news. What are the next steps when a professor thinks a course went “just fine” and the students clearly did not?

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A Lecture From the Lectured

A Lecture From the Lectured | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

When Molly Worthen asks, for instance, why it is so hard for her to hold our attention for just 90 minutes a day, we are happy to tell her.

 

Because it's rarely just 90 minutes of our day. At a university like ours, where thousands of students compete to fulfill their general-education requirements, it is lecture after lecture after lecture. For three to four hours of our day, we sit in cavernous rooms — with up to 800 strangers — where the professor doesn't know our name, let alone ask us to speak.

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