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Reap the Benefits of Experiential Learning Without Leaving the Classroom | Faculty Focus

Experiential learning is widely recognized as a high-impact educational practice that occurs outside the classroom through experiences such as internships, study abroad, and service-learning. However, experiential learning works very well inside the classroom as well. In fact, there are a number of reasons why faculty may want to facilitate an experiential learning component in class rather than outside of class.

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Teaching strategies for the college classroom
Articles and resources to help college faculty improve their teaching and stay current on the latest pedagogical challenges and trends for the face-to-face, online, blended, and flipped classroom.
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Advice for Teachers: Dare to Be Strict

Advice for Teachers: Dare to Be Strict | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

My syllabus, therefore, stresses the expectation that those enrolled will attend class regularly, remain attentive, and refrain from conversing, napping, or doing things unrelated to what we are discussing. I am convinced that most students support these policies based on the many who have thanked me over the years for making classroom order a priority. They report that some instructors do not admonish disruptors, leaving frustrated victims to bear that awkward task themselves or suffer silently. It makes sense that serious students would endorse these guidelines. What might be surprising are examples of reactions from some of the offenders that I’ve confronted.

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What’s an Empowered Student?

What’s an Empowered Student? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

That was the question, followed by, “Are they students who want to take over the classroom?” “No,” I replied, “it’s about how students approach learning—motivated, confident, and ready to tackle the task.”

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The problem is not the students. - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The problem is not the students. - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

I have learned that whenever I post something about flipped learning or anything else that is not standard lecture, I will get comments from folks whose words make it painfully clear that their work in higher education would be a lot easier if it weren’t for all those damned students. To those people, I would just like to say a few things.

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From Rusty to Robust: Overcoming the Challenges to Effective Faculty Development

From Rusty to Robust: Overcoming the Challenges to Effective Faculty Development | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
The past 10 years have witnessed some massive growing pains in education. Nearly all aspects at all levels have been touched by efforts to reform in an attempt to create meaningful learning opportunities for today’s students. New tools, skills, approaches, and media have redefined the way we create those experiences, and educators who don’t learn and engage in them will see themselves become increasingly irrelevant. In short, faculty development now more than ever is necessary to an institution’s viability.
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Encouraging Online Learner Participation

Encouraging Online Learner Participation | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Sustained, high-quality student participation usually doesn’t happen on its own in the online learning environment. The instructor needs to model participation, create assignments that encourage it, and foster an environment that supports it. Here are some ways that I promote student participation in my online courses.
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Can You Flip an Online Class?

Can You Flip an Online Class? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The flipped classroom has been defined as reversing what happens “in” and “out” of the classroom. Some scholars define the flip even more specifically as reversing homework and lectures where students watch videos of lectures for homework “out of class” and then engage in problem-solving and analysis “in class”.

 

But what happens when we apply this flipped model to an online class? The “in” class and “out of class” terminology doesn’t work. In the online class, what exactly is “class time” and what is “before class time”? If the definition of the flipped classroom always distinguishes between “in class” and “out of class”, how can we apply the flipped approach to an online class? This is why we need to expand the definition of the flip.

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6 Ways to Be a Better Online Teacher -- Campus Technology

6 Ways to Be a Better Online Teacher -- Campus Technology | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
With more and more faculty being asked to teach blended or online courses, the need for faculty training has never been higher. CT looks at tried-and-tested strategies for molding better online instructors.
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Five Pedagogical Practices to Improve Your Online Course

Five Pedagogical Practices to Improve Your Online Course | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Because online courses have fewer opportunities for the spontaneous, real-time exchanges of the face-to-face classroom, online instruction requires a deliberate approach to design and facilitation. As Bethany Simunich says, “Online, learning doesn’t happen by chance.” In an interview with Online Classroom, Simunich, associate director of online learning at Kent State University, offered the following techniques to improve an online course:
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Daydreaming or Deep in Thought? Using Formative Assessment to Evaluate Student Participation

Daydreaming or Deep in Thought? Using Formative Assessment to Evaluate Student Participation | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Many instructors will argue that student participation in class is important. But what’s the difference between participation and engagement? What does good participation or engagement look like? How can you recognize it? And how can you tell if a student is not engaged?
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Three Ways to Breathe New Life into Your Online Courses

Three Ways to Breathe New Life into Your Online Courses | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Online teaching is growing at a rapid pace. To meet the increasing demand of online education, many courses have been designed to enable the instructor to be more of a facilitator rather than an active participant in the classroom space (Ragan, 2009). However, building an active, student-centered learning environment in online classes is needed to prevent instructors from becoming stagnant and to motivate and inspire them to take on a variety of roles as the students’ “guide, facilitator, and teacher” (Ragan, 2009, p. 6). This article will discuss the unique needs of the online student and suggest three strategies to meet these needs through effective, innovative online instruction.
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Ten Critical Steps in Choosing a Learning Management System | Faculty Focus

Ten Critical Steps in Choosing a Learning Management System | Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Learn how to evaluate your school's current learning management system needs, develop an LMS selection process, and implement that process successfully.
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5 Things I Wish Everyone Understood About Educational Technology

5 Things I Wish Everyone Understood About Educational Technology | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Still….STILL….all these years later (it's 2014 and the internet is 25 years old) when we all know that technology isn't the point in education, there is still so much talk about the technology, the apps, the devices, the new shiny stuff. True, if it's new and shiny and cool it might enable me to redefine a task, that is if it's not too expensive or too difficult to learn or to manage.


Via EDTC@UTB, Rosemary Tyrrell
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 17, 5:01 PM

The first one is huge. It is not about technology. It is about good pedagogy which figures out when to use technology appropriately as part of a complex conversation.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, March 17, 5:15 PM

This is really so important. The first one in particular - in that it is not about the technology. Tech should always be the vehicle, not the driver, of good education, and we cannot get hung up on learning discrete skills. Instead, it is a case of what works best for the kids and engages them? 

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, March 18, 9:54 AM

Excellent points made here. 

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What Can We Learn from Self Doubt?

What Can We Learn from Self Doubt? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Here’s what I’ve learned: my self-doubt is sometimes painful and scary, but it is also a source of my energy, engagement, and growth because it leads me to questions I can try to answer and answers I can try to change.

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Creating a Comprehensive Plan for the Flipped Learning Environment | Faculty Focus

Creating a Comprehensive Plan for the Flipped Learning Environment | Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Explore the four key components of the flipped learning philosophy and develop an implementation strategy to enhance both student and faculty success. 

 

Join us in San Antonio, Nov. 7-8 for this hands-on workshop.

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Using Self-Determination Theory to Improve Online Learner Motivation | Magna Publications

Using Self-Determination Theory to Improve Online Learner Motivation | Magna Publications | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

According to self-determination theory, a theory developed by Deci and Ryan, three basic psychological needs affect motivation: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Susan Epps, associate professor of Allied Health Sciences, and Alison Barton, associate professor of Teaching and Learning, both at East Tennessee State University, have used this theory to develop ways to improve online learner motivation.

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Moving a Face-to-Face Course Online without Losing Student Engagement

Moving a Face-to-Face Course Online without Losing Student Engagement | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
The rapid growth and popularity of online learning is necessitating the creation of online courses that actively engage learners. Research has shown that effective integration of multimedia that is content relevant and pedagogically sound can be a valuable teaching tool for facilitating student learning (Mandernach, 2009).
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So Much to Do, So Little Time - Inside Higher Ed

So Much to Do, So Little Time - Inside Higher Ed | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
About one-third of work-week days – 35 percent – was spent on teaching, including 12 percent for instruction and 11 percent on course administration, such as grading and updating course webpages.
 
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Creating Learning Environments that Help Students Stretch and Grow as Learners

Creating Learning Environments that Help Students Stretch and Grow as Learners | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The diversity of learning needs present in every classroom (physical and virtual) confronts teachers with a sizeable challenge. How do you respond to different learning needs in shared learning spaces? The obvious answer is by providing a range of different learning experiences, not expecting learners always to demonstrate their mastery of the material in the same way.

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Reading Circles Get Students to Do the Reading

Reading Circles Get Students to Do the Reading | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

I told my students that the success of their Reading Circle depended on two things: everyone coming prepared by having read the assignment and everyone participating. In my humanities course, the four texts are traditionally chosen by the teacher, but wanting to be student-centered, I decided to let the students choose two of the texts. Annotated bibliographies were distributed early to help students make informed choices. I formed the groups based on their choice of text. In some cases, two groups needed to be formed, as I limited group size to six, given the roles I wanted students to fill in the groups:

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What’s Your Learning Philosophy?

What’s Your Learning Philosophy? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

We are all familiar with teaching philosophies. In fact, most of us have prepared them. But how many of us have crafted a learning philosophy?

 

I dug out my teaching philosophy statement and was stunned by its almost exclusive focus on teaching. There are some passing references made to learning, but no critical analysis of my beliefs about it. So I’ve started trying to write my learning philosophy, and it seems to be coalescing around three areas; beliefs about learning in general, beliefs about the relationship between teaching and learning, and beliefs about myself as a learner. In the first category, I’ve been thinking about the role of learning in a democratic society and what happens when people do and don’t value learning.

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Creating learning objectives, flipped classroom style - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Creating learning objectives, flipped classroom style - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

A clear set of learning objectives is at the heart of any successful learning experience, and it’s an essential ingredient for self-regulated learning since self-regulating learners have a clear set of criteria against which to judge their learning progress. And yet, many instructors – myself included in the early years of my career – never map out learning objectives either for themselves or for their students. Or, they do, and they’re so mushy that they can’t be measured – like any so-called objective beginning with the words “understand” or “appreciate”.


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Hamline CTL's curator insight, March 6, 5:46 AM

Articulate, concise explanation of HOW to write effective learning objectives.

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In Defense of Teaching

In Defense of Teaching | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Tired descriptors such as “sage on the stage” and “guide on the side” have permeated the pedagogical literature for more than two decades now even though they greatly oversimplify what really takes place in the college classroom. Most teaching occurs on a continuum between these two extremes. But now the term “lecture” is equated with using didactic instruction and nothing else. It is regularly blamed for a multitude of pedagogical problems in the academy. Articles in various educational journals regularly associate teaching with telling and continue to recommend that this traditional method be completely abandoned in favor of more student-centered strategies that promote active learning.

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Change the Homework, Improve Student Achievement -- Campus Technology

Change the Homework, Improve Student Achievement -- Campus Technology | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
A new study from Rice and Duke researchers identified a relatively non-invasive approach to improving student achievement — one that doesn't involve gutting the curriculum or reinventing pedagogy. The researchers found that implementing subtle, technology-based changes to homework resulted in improvements in student performance on tests.
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Four Lessons about Learning Discovered on a Chairlift

Four Lessons about Learning Discovered on a Chairlift | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Chemistry professor Steven M. Wright has written a one-page essay about his niece, Julia, learning how to downhill ski. She was ready for her first ride on the chairlift and Wright was helping her. He’s a professor so he covered the topic in a well-organized, easy-to-understand way. It was a short, five minute lecture that ended with a repeat of the main point, “keep your ski tips up when you get on the lift.'"

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The wonders of the traditional college classroom (essay) | Inside Higher Ed

The wonders of the traditional college classroom (essay) | Inside Higher Ed | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Why do they come? Thirty-seven smiling young faces in a classroom look up at me, oozing confidence that I will teach them successfully and help them pass the course. I confide in them: the course should really have 24 students for an optimum presentation. Nobody moves. And the smiles stay fixed.

 

I tell them that everything I teach is available online, and the jokes there are probably funnier than the ones I use. They sit still. As they do in the classes of almost two million other faculty members.

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