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Adjuncts Build Strength in Numbers - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Adjuncts Build Strength in Numbers - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Caroline W. Meline stood at the front of her classroom one day last month and began reading from a red paperback, Karl Marx: Selected Writings. A few sentences in, she paused and closed her eyes.

 

"I just have to catch my breath," she told her students.

 

She was 15 minutes into a philosophy class at Saint Joseph's University. "This is my third class of the day. I need to regroup my energy.

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Teaching strategies for the college classroom
Articles and resources to help college faculty improve their teaching and stay current on the latest pedagogical challenges and trends for the face-to-face, online, blended, and flipped classroom.
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Blended and Flipped: New Models for Effective Teaching & Learning | Faculty Focus

Blended and Flipped: New Models for Effective Teaching & Learning | Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

This free, downloadable report features 12 articles curated from past issues of The Teaching Professor, Online Classroom, and Faculty Focus. With six articles dedicated to blended learning and six articles on the flipped classroom, Blended and Flipped: Exploring New Models for Effective Teaching & Learning provides an inside look at how faculty are using these approaches to reshape the college classroom.

Articles include:

-Putting the Learning in Blended Learning

-Recommendations for Blended Learning Course Design
-The Process Approach to Online and Blended Learning

-Expanding the Definition of a Flipped Learning Environment

-“I Don’t Like This One Little Bit.” Tales from a Flipped Classroom

-Looking for ‘Flippable’ Moments in Your Class

If you're looking to put more emphasis on active learning in your courses next semester,  this report is loaded with practical advice for getting started.

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Designing Developmentally Appropriate Writing Assignments

Designing Developmentally Appropriate Writing Assignments | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The five authors describe the goals and offer illustrations of writing assignments developmentally appropriate in beginning, intermediate, and advanced psychology courses. Their justification makes sense in any discipline. “If the psychology curriculum is developmentally structured to progress from introductory to advanced courses to foster student learning …, it is reasonable to argue that they may benefit from writing assignments that match this gradual increase in complexity.” (p. 88) Most faculty do use assignments that reflect the level of the course but not with the thoughtful planning and care illustrated by the assignments described in this article.

 

 

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Strategies for Increasing Faculty Participation & Retention in Online & Blended Education

The need for online and blended programs within higher education continues to grow as the student population in the United States becomes increasingly non-traditional. As administrators strategically offer and expand online and blended programs, faculty recruitment and retention will be key. This case study highlights how a public comprehensive university utilized the results of a 2012 institutional study to design faculty development initiatives, an online course development process, and an online course review process to support faculty participation and retention in online and blended programs. Recommendations based on this case study include replicable strategies on how to increase faculty participation and retention in online and blended programs using collaboration, support, and ongoing assessment. This case study is a compendium to the 2012 Armstrong institutional study highlighted in the article "Factors Influencing Faculty Participation & Retention In Online & Blended Education."

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Creating a Respectful Classroom Environment

Creating a Respectful Classroom Environment | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

“In our class: 1) everyone is allowed to feel they can work and learn in a safe and caring environment; 2) everyone learns about, understands, appreciates, and respects varied races, classes, genders, physical and mental abilities, and sexualities; 3) everyone matters; 4) all individuals are to be respected and treated with dignity and civility; and 5) everyone shares the responsibility for making our class, and the Academy, a positive and better place to live, work, and learn.”

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Teaching Professor Technology Conference | Oct. 10-12 in Denver

Teaching Professor Technology Conference | Oct. 10-12 in Denver | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The 2014 Teaching Professor Technology Conference will examine the technologies that are changing the way teachers teach and learners learn while giving special emphasis to the pedagogically effective ways you can harness these new technologies in your courses and on your campus.

 

The three-day conference will bring together faculty, instructional designers, faculty developers, educational technology leaders, and other higher education professionals interested in learning more about how technology is altering the learning environment

 

Join us in Denver, Oct. 10-12. 

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Opening Intentions for the First Day of Class

Opening Intentions for the First Day of Class | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

"Though I’ve taught this material many times,
may I be open to fresh ways of making connections,
sharing the passion that brought me to this field,
and seeing how each year’s students extend my learning
by their backgrounds and beliefs, their questions and answers.

 

So may you have the courage to ask your questions,
trusting me to respect any sincere contribution
(usually shared silently by others),
knowing that the worst outcome
is simply my offer to discuss it later.
And may you also be willing to offer answers,
knowing that class dialogue is enriched by multiple methods and points of view, and that exploring even incomplete answers yields insight for all."

Faculty Focus's insight:

Anyone who teaches should read these opening intentions to their class on the first day of class.

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Blending and flipping modern architecture - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Blending and flipping modern architecture - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

So if the students are getting the lecture online, what do we do in class? What incentive do they have to come to class if all the info is online? Well, first, not all the content is online. A few topics that require extensive discussion and interaction are still presented in an interactive “lecture” format. Class time is also used for small group work, discussion, guest lectures, and other interactive activities.

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Transcending Disciplinary Boundaries: Conversations about Student Research Projects

Transcending Disciplinary Boundaries: Conversations about Student Research Projects | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
One of the most enjoyable aspects of running a faculty development program on teaching is seeing first-hand how much our various disciplines intersect when it comes to teaching and learning. Whereas it can be hard, if not impossible, to speak about disciplinary research with colleagues outside our fields, the common teaching problems we face allow for readily understandable dialog, no matter how far apart the discussants’ fields of expertise.
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A Quick, No-Nonsense Guide to Basic Instructional Design Theory

A Quick, No-Nonsense Guide to Basic Instructional Design Theory | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Of the many eLearning theories that influence the practice, three of them are used by professionals on a daily basis.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Tina Jameson's curator insight, June 19, 8:33 PM

A nice visual of three predominantly observed theories of learning:
Cognitivism
Behaviourism
Constructivism 

José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, June 20, 4:21 AM

Ótimo infográfico com dicas sobre as três teorias de aprendizagem (construtivismo, behaviorismo e cognitivismo) mais comuns nos programas de design instrucional. Simples sem ser simplista.

Darleana McHenry's curator insight, June 26, 6:19 AM

I love stuff like this. It makes me think about what I am doing and why :-)

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The Secret of Self-Regulated Learning

The Secret of Self-Regulated Learning | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Self-regulated learning is like your own little secret. It stirs from within you, and is the voice in your head that asks you questions about your learning.

More formally, self-regulated learning is the conscious planning, monitoring, evaluation, and ultimately control of one’s learning in order to maximize it. It’s an ordered process that experts and seasoned learners like us practice automatically. It means being mindful, intentional, reflective, introspective, self-aware, self-controlled, and self-disciplined about learning, and it leads to becoming self-directed.
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The Case for Banning Laptops in the Classroom

The Case for Banning Laptops in the Classroom | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
A wealth of studies on students’ use of computers in the classroom supports the notion of banning them.
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Using Your Syllabus as a Learning Resource

Using Your Syllabus as a Learning Resource | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
We know students do not take it upon themselves to read the syllabus. Yet syllabus indifference still bewilders me after teaching for 25 years, given that my syllabi are conveniently available online and in hard copy, and are replete with information virtually assuring success with my courses.
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“I Tried It and It Didn’t Work!”

“I Tried It and It Didn’t Work!” | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Someone sought me out recently to say that she’d tried something I had recommended and it didn’t work. “You need to stop recommending that to people,” she told me. “How many times did you try it?” I asked. “Once and the students hated it,” she responded. This rather direct feedback caused me to revisit (and revise) a set of assumptions that can create more accurate expectations when implementing new instructional approaches.
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Three Active Learning Strategies That Push Students Beyond Memorization

Three Active Learning Strategies That Push Students Beyond Memorization | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Those who teach in the health disciplines expect their students to retain and apply every iota of learned material. However, many students come to us having achieved academic success by memorizing the content, regurgitating that information onto an exam, and promptly forgetting a good portion of it. In health, as well as other disciplines where new material builds upon the material from the previous semesters, it is critical for students to retain what they learn throughout their coursework and as they begin their careers as a nurse, engineer, elementary teacher, etc.
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Who Performs the Best in Online Classes?

Who Performs the Best in Online Classes? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Which types of student characteristics lead to the best performance in online classes? That depends on how you define

Via Mark Smithers
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To Improve Student Performance, Start Thinking Like a Coach

To Improve Student Performance, Start Thinking Like a Coach | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
I have a confession to make. I was wrong. You see, I once thought that teaching was lecturing, and I thought that because that is how my graduate mentors taught me to teach.

But I was wrong. Studies have shown that lecturing has little to do with teaching. A University of Maryland study found that right after a physics lecture, almost none of the students could answer the question: “What was the lecture you just heard about?” Another physics professor simply asked students about the material that he had presented only 15 minutes earlier, and he found that only ten percent showed any sign of remembering it (Freedman, 2012).
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Teaching & Learning - The Power of We - Magna Publications

Teaching & Learning - The Power of We - Magna Publications | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Being a college professor sometimes feels lonely. Yes, we have colleagues in our departments and elsewhere on campus, students in our classrooms, and administrators who support us, but we also spend a lot of time working by ourselves. As new faculty members, we decided that “the power of we” was important for enhancing pedagogical practice, and we thought that maybe the cycle of loneliness could be broken by a pedagogy group. What follows describes how we formed the group, what we have done together, and, most important, what we’ve gained from the experience. We’re not the first to tell this story, but our view is that, to paraphrase a famous thought, in a time of teaching to the test, erasing the barriers between student and teacher is a radical act.

 

 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 1, 9:52 AM

If teaching at the college level is lonely, can you imagine how lonely it is to be a K-12 teacher? The structure is designed for separation and this separating is not overcome by wishing for cooperative work space and different structures in staff meetings. Those are just words and wishes.

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Improve Accessibility in Tomorrow’s Online Courses by Leveraging Yesterday’s Techniques

Improve Accessibility in Tomorrow’s Online Courses by Leveraging Yesterday’s Techniques | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Traditionally, when a face-to-face student requested a sign language interpreter or other assistance, individualized accommodation arrangements were made through institutional channels.

With the advent of online courses, however, the concept of accessibility has emerged. In contrast to the reactive, customized approach of accommodation, accessibility means proactively identifying and removing as many barriers to instruction as possible—before a course is ever opened for registration.
While some argue that building in accessibility is prohibitively expensive, recent lawsuits are driving more and more institutions to view accessibility as a requirement rather than a luxury. Unfortunately, making an online course accessible is tough—unless you’re familiar with traditional print techniques.
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What’s Your Relationship with Your Textbook?

What’s Your Relationship with Your Textbook? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Do we think about the teacher-text relationship when we select course materials? Many times a new textbook prompts changes to the course, but often these revisions don’t go beyond reorganizing what we’ve been doing in class so that it aligns with how the material is sequenced in the text. Or sometimes we do the reverse, reorganize the content in the text so that it follows the order we cover topics in the course; assigning chapters out of order, or selecting several parts of different chapters at the same time. Both of these approaches ignore the question of relationship and end up being realignments that probably benefit the teacher more than the students.

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A real world MOOC experience

A real world MOOC experience | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
MOOC have a notoriously low completion rate, but what's it like to be one of the 7% who actually complete a course? This post tells you all.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 22, 1:57 AM

Have you ever met a person who finished a Mooc? Here's one fellow who completed his first mooc and lived to blog about it. 



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An Effective Learning Environment is a Shared Responsibility

An Effective Learning Environment is a Shared Responsibility | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Whether it’s a student who is texting during class, an online student who makes minimal comments to the discussion board, or a teacher who marches nonstop through mountains of material, the learning environment is defined by a combination of individual behaviors, and everybody contributes to what that environment becomes.
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Three issues with the case for banning laptops

Three issues with the case for banning laptops | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

I don’t deny that most college students seem to use technology primarily as an entertainment appliance. But if anything, a university education can co-opt technology and make it into a tool for learning. The prevalence of the game culture surrounding technology means this is not going to be automatic – teaching students to use technology as a tool for self-regulated learning can and should be an explicit goal in higher education. And yet, laptops that are supposed to be banned from the classroom? How can we begin to instruct students on how to use technology as a learning tool, if we deliberately exclude them from the arenas in which learning takes place?


Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, June 16, 11:19 AM

Some excellent points here. 

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Assessing What Your Students Know, Want to Know, and Have Learned

Assessing What Your Students Know, Want to Know, and Have Learned | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Measuring student success is a top priority to ensure the best possible student outcomes. Through the years instructors have implemented new and creative strategies to assess student learning in both traditional and online higher education classrooms. Assessments can range from formative assessments, which monitor student learning with quick, efficient, and frequent checks on learning; to summative assessments, which evaluate student learning with “high stakes” exams, projects, and papers at the end of a unit or term.
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Playing with Questions

Playing with Questions | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Preparing one of the plenary sessions for the recent Teaching Professor Conference provided me the opportunity to do some more work on questions, which if you’re a regular reader of this blog you will recognize as an ongoing interest of mine for more than a year now. In fact, the post on May 28, 2014 is a reprint of an article I wrote for the March 2013 issue of The Teaching Professor newsletter. It represents some of my early thinking on the topic, including ways of emphasizing questions in our teaching and modeling good question types for our students. The ability to ask good questions is often an underrated and underdeveloped skill, yet questions can play such a significant role in learning when used properly.
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Four things I wish I'd known about the flipped classroom - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Four things I wish I'd known about the flipped classroom - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The flipped classroom has many benefits for students – but, students will not always understand those benefits automatically. Those benefits are numerous: students get practice honing self-regulated learning skills on a regular basis, they get a professionally curated set of materials to use, and so on. But I’ve documented repeatedly here on the blog that there is still a a considerable amount of marketing that has to be done.

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