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Understanding the Flipped Classroom: Part 1 | Faculty Focus

Understanding the Flipped Classroom: Part 1 | Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The flipped classroom seems to be the latest buzz in educational trends. Is this truly a new revolutionary approach or a revision of a technique used throughout the ages? To be clear, in simplest terms, flipping the classroom refers to swapping classroom lecture time for hands-on practice time. So the lecture is done for homework usually via a video or audio file and the classroom time is spent clarifying and applying new knowledge gained.

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Teaching strategies for the college classroom
Articles and resources to help college faculty improve their teaching and stay current on the latest pedagogical challenges and trends for the face-to-face, online, blended, and flipped classroom.
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Confessions of a Gen-Ed Junkie – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Confessions of a Gen-Ed Junkie – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

I’m just going to come right out and say it: I like teaching gen ed. I like it a lot. In fact, I like it more than my major classes. OK, so if my dean calls, I’m going to say I didn’t really mean that. But honestly—just between me and you, Chronicle readers—I do.

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Six Principles for Measuring and Communicating the Value of Your Faculty Development Center

Six Principles for Measuring and Communicating the Value of Your Faculty Development Center | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
This is an era of rapid transformation and heightened opportunities for Faculty Development Centers (FDCs). There is a growing realization that faculty development can be a crucial component in addressing some of the most significant challenges facing higher education, including technology’s impact on teaching, reliance on part-time and distance faculty, and student success.
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Introduction to Key Concepts in Five Minutes or Less: The ‘Did You Know?’ Microlecture Series

Introduction to Key Concepts in Five Minutes or Less: The ‘Did You Know?’ Microlecture Series | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Microlectures (snippets) are simple multimedia presentations that are 90 seconds to five minutes long. They focus on a specific concept or skill associated with the course’s learning objectives. Microlectures allow students to access instruction on a specific concept or skill they need to practice

 

 

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"She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.” | Faculty Focus

"She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.” | Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Yesterday I got an email from a faculty member who had just received her spring semester student ratings (yes, in August, but that’s a topic for another post). She’d gotten one of those blistering student comments. “This teacher should not be paid. We had to teach ourselves in this course.” I remember another faculty member telling me about similar feedback, which was followed later with a comment about how the course “really made me think.”
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A Twitter Assignment in 15 Tweets | Matt Paproth

A Twitter Assignment in 15 Tweets | Matt Paproth | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

In “Tweeting English 1101,” I discuss the semester-length Twitter project that I have given my students in a Digital Communication-themed first-year communication course. The assignment sheet, posted below, contains both the initial prompt that I give students, as well as a series of 15 tweets that scaffold the project: the three-parter (in conjunction with an explanation in class) that serves as the initial instructions, one message that I post at the start of each of the ten weeks of the project, and a final message that briefly explains the follow-up assignment. Finally, I present a series of links that I ask students to read early in the project as a basis for class discussion.

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Why I’m Asking You Not to Use Laptops – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Why I’m Asking You Not to Use Laptops – The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

First, if you have your laptop open, it is almost impossible not to check email or briefly surf the Internet, even if you don’t mean to or have told yourself that you won’t. I have the same impulse if I have my laptop open in a meeting. The problem is that studies indicate that this kind of multitasking impairs learning; once we are on email/the web, we are no longer paying very good attention to what is happening in class. (And there is no evidence I know of that “practice” at doing this kind of multitasking is going to make you better at it!)

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Monitor Nonverbal Communication to Know When and How to Intervene in the Online Classroom | Magna Publications

Monitor Nonverbal Communication to Know When and How to Intervene in the Online Classroom | Magna Publications | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

In the face-to-face classroom, nonverbal communication such as facial expressions, body posture, eye contact, gestures, and attendance are often used to gauge students’ engagement and understanding. Instructors can use these cues to know when to provide additional support and instruction before proceeding to the next topic. But what about in the online classroom? Are there nonverbal forms of communication that can help instructors know when students have gone off track and need help?

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The Teaching Professor Upcoming Conferences | Faculty Focus

The Teaching Professor Upcoming Conferences | Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Join us in Denver, Colorado for the Teaching Professor Technology Conference., Oct. 10-12. This three-day conference examines the technologies that are changing the way higher education teachers teach and students learn while giving special emphasis to the pedagogically effective ways you can harness these new technologies in your courses and on your campus.

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26 Questions Every Student Should Be Able To Answer

26 Questions Every Student Should Be Able To Answer | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
26 Questions Every Student Should Be Able To Answer

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, August 19, 4:49 PM

Great ideas here for implementation as well. This post is about encouraging student introspection and thoughtful responses. Easily adapted to higher education. 

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2 Great Techniques for the Flipped Classroom -- Campus Technology

2 Great Techniques for the Flipped Classroom -- Campus Technology | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Inspire more student engagement in a flipped class with these two pedagogy-driven methods.
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Motivating Students: Should Effort Count?

Motivating Students: Should Effort Count? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
I’ve always said no, effort shouldn’t count. When students pleaded, “but I worked so hard,” or “I studied so long,” I would respond with the clichéd quip about people with brain tumors not wanting surgeons who try hard. Besides if students try hard, if they do their assignments, come to class, take notes, ask questions, and study on more nights than the one before the exam, that effort will pay off. They will learn the material, and their grades will reflect that learning.
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Promoting Academic Integrity in the Online Classroom

Promoting Academic Integrity in the Online Classroom | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Teddi Fishman, director of the International Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University, advocates an instructional design/community-building approach to academic integrity rather than an adversarial approach. Her stint as a police officer informs this stance. As radar gun companies introduced improved speed enforcement tools, the latest radar detectors (often produced by the same companies) rendered such improvements ineffective. “I learned that you can’t out-tech people, and you don’t want to get into that situation. You don’t want to have that arms race. Certainly some security measures are going to be necessary, but don’t get into the habit of relying on technology to establish a climate of integrity, because it can have adverse effects. Nobody wants to feel like they’re being watched all the time,” she says.
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I Lie About My Teaching

I Lie About My Teaching | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
It's hard to get a true sense of what a classroom is really like—especially from the adult who runs it.

Via Hybrid Pedagogy
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When to Use Whole Class Feedback

When to Use Whole Class Feedback | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Whole class feedback … you know, when the teacher returns a set of papers or exams and talks to the entire class about its performance, or the debriefing part of an activity where the teacher comments on how students completed the task. I don’t believe I have ever seen anything written about this feedback mechanism, even though I think most of us use it pretty regularly. Is it a good way to provide feedback? Do students pay any attention to feedback delivered in this way? When whole class feedback most effective? After an exam? During group projects? Is it better to provide the feedback verbally or post it online? Should students be involved in this discussion of how well the class did or didn’t do?
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10 Recommendations for Improving Group Work

10 Recommendations for Improving Group Work | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Many faculty now have students do some graded work in groups. The task may be, for example, preparation of a paper or report, collection and analysis of data, a presentation supported with visuals, or creation of a website. Faculty make these assignments with high expectations. They want the groups to produce quality work—better than what the students could do individually—and they want the students to learn how to work productively with others. Sometimes those expectations are realized, but most of the time there is room for improvement—sometimes lots of it. To that end, below is a set of suggestions for improving group projects. A list in the article referenced below provided a starting place for these recommendations.
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Strategies for Dealing with a Certified Jerk

Strategies for Dealing with a Certified Jerk | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Incivility and lack of collegiality are on the rise in institutions of higher education (Cipriano, 2011). This phenomenon can range from disputes and tension at one end of the spectrum to violence at the other. There are many departments that suffer from non-collegial, uncivil, and nasty encounters between faculty members, faculty members and professional staff, and faculty members and students.
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5 Accessible Design Tips for Blended Courses | Campus Technology

5 Accessible Design Tips for Blended Courses | Campus Technology | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Revamping a course to be accessible to students with physical or learning disabilities can help make it more accessible to everybody else too.
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Those Magical and Mysterious Learning Moments

Those Magical and Mysterious Learning Moments | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
I’ve been reading some old issues of The Teaching Professor newsletter and ran across a lovely piece by William Reinsmith on learning moments. He’s writing about those times when students get it, when something turns the lights on and they glow with understanding. It may be a moment when they finally figure out how to do so something—a long elusive skill or a solution to a problem. Other times it’s a moment of insight, often a possibility or explanation that had never crossed their minds, or a set of ideas that come together and create a new perspective on a familiar issue.
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A Rising Tide Lifts All Boats: Raising, Communicating, and Enforcing Expectations in Online Courses

A Rising Tide Lifts All Boats: Raising, Communicating, and Enforcing Expectations in Online Courses | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

From the beginning, some students submitted their assignments without reading any of my sage advice. About a third missed the deadline for the first assignment. Several assignments were missing key components, and some exhibited major formatting flaws. There was a flurry of questions in the discussion forum about the due date and format—answers to which could be found in the numerous documents I had posted. Student frustration mounted when I referred them to existing documents. Indeed, the instant gratification associated with the Internet has “trained students to expect help when they require it—on their schedule” (Creasman, 2012).

 

I provided feedback by electronically editing each assignment and returning the marked-up documents. I was discouraged when I noticed that students continued to make the same errors on subsequent assignments—proof that they had not incorporated my previous feedback. Had they even seen it? It occurred to me that I would need to find more innovative ways to communicate my expectations.

 

I have been able to raise expectations and improve the quality of work in my course by implementing the following practices.

 

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Study examines professors' writing assignments for students | Inside Higher Ed

Study examines professors' writing assignments for students | Inside Higher Ed | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Professors sometimes bemoan their students' writing skills. But how good are professors at creating quality writing assignments? There's no recent, national study of how and what professors are asking their students to write, despite lots of research suggesting that rich, varied writing assignments and opportunities for feedback mean better student papers. A new book seeks to fill that data void, and argues that what professors are asking their students to write is as important as what students end up writing.

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Reality Check: Helping to Manage Student Expectations

Reality Check: Helping to Manage Student Expectations | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Most students begin college, the academic year, and new courses motivated and optimistic. Many first-year students expect to do well because they were successful in high school. Some are right, but others will only find similar success if they work much harder than they did in high school. Yet most start out expending the same level of effort. They will talk with their classmates and convince each other that an exam covering three chapters can’t be that hard, so they put off studying and then “look over” the chapters the night before— happily dealing with any and all interruptions and distractions.
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Using “Mulligans” to Enhance Student Participation and Reduce Test Anxiety

Using “Mulligans” to Enhance Student Participation and Reduce Test Anxiety | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
When I speak with other professors who work extensively in the classroom, we often find that we share many of the same challenges. Students’ lack of classroom participation in discussion and test anxiety are two of the most common. Many professors try to mitigate these issues through two time-honored pedagogical tactics: a participation grade and extra credit questions on tests. While both tactics can be effective, by applying concepts from gamification research I found a way to both enhance classroom participation and reduce test anxiety with one simple technique.
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The Art and Science of Successful Online Discussions

The Art and Science of Successful Online Discussions | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Faculty use asynchronous discussions to extend and enhance instructional practices in the online classroom. It is widely reported that online discussions play an integral role in facilitating students’ learning, as well as fostering dialogue, critical thinking, and reflective inquiry (Kayler & Weller, 2007; Morris, Finnegan, & Sz-Shyan, 2005). Despite faculty’s knowledge that discussion forums can serve as a useful learning tool, online discussions are not easy to establish and manage.
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Helping Students More Accurately Assess Their Performance - Magna Publications

Helping Students More Accurately Assess Their Performance - Magna Publications | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Are your students overly optimistic about their course grades? It is the time of the semester when reality starts sinking in, although many students in trouble don’t express surprise or concern until after the course has ended. Several studies have documented that students, particularly beginning ones, tend to overestimate how well they’re doing in a course.

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20 NEW facts about Flipped Learning in higher ed - eCampus News

20 NEW facts about Flipped Learning in higher ed - eCampus News | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
According to a 2014 research and case study review, there are roughly 20 new things higher education faculty and leaders should know about Flipped Learning.
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