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Teaching strategies for the college classroom
Articles and resources to help college faculty improve their teaching and stay current on the latest pedagogical challenges and trends for the face-to-face, online, blended, and flipped classroom.
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Discussion Board Audit—A Metacognitive, Wrap-up Assignment

Discussion Board Audit—A Metacognitive, Wrap-up Assignment | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The discussion board audit is the final assignment in the course in which each student analyzes his or her contributions to the discussion board. It’s a more open-ended assignment than the discussion board discussions. Students do not need to provide citations. They are simply asked to go back and reread all of their posts and comments and reflect on them in a four-to-five-page paper. The following are suggested questions for the students to consider: 

 

 

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Expanding Your Online Pedagogy Toolkit | Inside Higher Ed

Expanding Your Online Pedagogy Toolkit | Inside Higher Ed | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Next-generation online learning involves challenges, inquiry, and problem solving. Students, individually and in small groups, have opportunities to learn by doing. Depending on the nature of the course, they might engage in hypothesis formulation and testing, data analysis, or constructing and applying rubrics. Simulations, in particular, give students opportunities to mimic professional practice and exercise real-world skills.

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The Sound of Silence: The Value of Quiet Contemplation in the Classroom

The Sound of Silence: The Value of Quiet Contemplation in the Classroom | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The scenario is all too familiar to most educators. The instructor asks a question to the class, the class either looks down or passes quick glances around the room to see if anyone looks like they are about to answer, and if no one is giving any indication of preparing a response the atmosphere becomes tense. Eventually, either some brave soul will wade into the discussion in the hopes of breaking the awkward silence, or the instructor will answer the question and continue on.

 

But why is that silence so uncomfortable?

 

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The Human Variable in Teaching

The Human Variable in Teaching | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
A professor of physics at the U. of the District of Columbia took a scientific interest in teaching and, in his work with one student in particular, found humanity in the profession.
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Creating a Comprehensive Plan for the Flipped Learning Environment | Faculty Focus

Creating a Comprehensive Plan for the Flipped Learning Environment | Faculty Focus | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Explore the four key components of the flipped learning philosophy and develop an implementation strategy to enhance both student and faculty success. 

 

Join us in San Antonio, Nov. 7-8 for this hands-on workshop.

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Using Self-Determination Theory to Improve Online Learner Motivation | Magna Publications

Using Self-Determination Theory to Improve Online Learner Motivation | Magna Publications | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

According to self-determination theory, a theory developed by Deci and Ryan, three basic psychological needs affect motivation: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Susan Epps, associate professor of Allied Health Sciences, and Alison Barton, associate professor of Teaching and Learning, both at East Tennessee State University, have used this theory to develop ways to improve online learner motivation.

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Moving a Face-to-Face Course Online without Losing Student Engagement

Moving a Face-to-Face Course Online without Losing Student Engagement | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
The rapid growth and popularity of online learning is necessitating the creation of online courses that actively engage learners. Research has shown that effective integration of multimedia that is content relevant and pedagogically sound can be a valuable teaching tool for facilitating student learning (Mandernach, 2009).
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So Much to Do, So Little Time - Inside Higher Ed

So Much to Do, So Little Time - Inside Higher Ed | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
About one-third of work-week days – 35 percent – was spent on teaching, including 12 percent for instruction and 11 percent on course administration, such as grading and updating course webpages.
 
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Creating Learning Environments that Help Students Stretch and Grow as Learners

Creating Learning Environments that Help Students Stretch and Grow as Learners | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The diversity of learning needs present in every classroom (physical and virtual) confronts teachers with a sizeable challenge. How do you respond to different learning needs in shared learning spaces? The obvious answer is by providing a range of different learning experiences, not expecting learners always to demonstrate their mastery of the material in the same way.

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Reading Circles Get Students to Do the Reading

Reading Circles Get Students to Do the Reading | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

I told my students that the success of their Reading Circle depended on two things: everyone coming prepared by having read the assignment and everyone participating. In my humanities course, the four texts are traditionally chosen by the teacher, but wanting to be student-centered, I decided to let the students choose two of the texts. Annotated bibliographies were distributed early to help students make informed choices. I formed the groups based on their choice of text. In some cases, two groups needed to be formed, as I limited group size to six, given the roles I wanted students to fill in the groups:

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What’s Your Learning Philosophy?

What’s Your Learning Philosophy? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

We are all familiar with teaching philosophies. In fact, most of us have prepared them. But how many of us have crafted a learning philosophy?

 

I dug out my teaching philosophy statement and was stunned by its almost exclusive focus on teaching. There are some passing references made to learning, but no critical analysis of my beliefs about it. So I’ve started trying to write my learning philosophy, and it seems to be coalescing around three areas; beliefs about learning in general, beliefs about the relationship between teaching and learning, and beliefs about myself as a learner. In the first category, I’ve been thinking about the role of learning in a democratic society and what happens when people do and don’t value learning.

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Creating learning objectives, flipped classroom style - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Creating learning objectives, flipped classroom style - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

A clear set of learning objectives is at the heart of any successful learning experience, and it’s an essential ingredient for self-regulated learning since self-regulating learners have a clear set of criteria against which to judge their learning progress. And yet, many instructors – myself included in the early years of my career – never map out learning objectives either for themselves or for their students. Or, they do, and they’re so mushy that they can’t be measured – like any so-called objective beginning with the words “understand” or “appreciate”.


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Hamline CTL's curator insight, March 6, 5:46 AM

Articulate, concise explanation of HOW to write effective learning objectives.

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In Defense of Teaching

In Defense of Teaching | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Tired descriptors such as “sage on the stage” and “guide on the side” have permeated the pedagogical literature for more than two decades now even though they greatly oversimplify what really takes place in the college classroom. Most teaching occurs on a continuum between these two extremes. But now the term “lecture” is equated with using didactic instruction and nothing else. It is regularly blamed for a multitude of pedagogical problems in the academy. Articles in various educational journals regularly associate teaching with telling and continue to recommend that this traditional method be completely abandoned in favor of more student-centered strategies that promote active learning.

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Infographic of Building an Online Personal Teaching Network

Infographic of Building an Online Personal Teaching Network | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Recently, I wrote an article about how to build an online personal teaching network, re-imagining opportunities to teach in the digital world and thinking about the role of teacher as independent c...

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, Today, 4:27 AM

Love this graphic about network building!

R Hollingsworth's curator insight, Today, 7:54 AM

great info graphic!

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Class Discussion Challenge: Getting Students to Listen and Respond to Each Other's Comments

Class Discussion Challenge: Getting Students to Listen and Respond to Each Other's Comments | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

Issue 1: The classroom discussion is going pretty well. Students are offering some good comments and more than one hand is in the air. Then a student makes a really excellent observation that opens up a whole avenue of relevant possibilities. You follow-up by calling on a student whose hand has been in the air for some time. Her comment is fine, but it’s totally unrelated to the previous comment. How do you get students to respond to each other’s comments? How do you get student comments to build on a key topic so that it becomes more like a real discussion?

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When lectures fall short as a teaching tool (essay) | Inside Higher Ed

When lectures fall short as a teaching tool (essay) | Inside Higher Ed | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

A set of well-tested interventions that can improve learning in traditional lecture courses are collectively known as “active learning.” These activities seem most effective when carried out in small groups. To make the group work less awkward, instead of sitting in rows in a lecture hall and staring at me, my students in introductory physics sit around tables and stare at each other. It can still be awkward. Reminders that this is not just about having fun or being educationally trendy, but is instead about using our time effectively, are a necessary part of my routine.

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Advice for Teachers: Dare to Be Strict

Advice for Teachers: Dare to Be Strict | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

My syllabus, therefore, stresses the expectation that those enrolled will attend class regularly, remain attentive, and refrain from conversing, napping, or doing things unrelated to what we are discussing. I am convinced that most students support these policies based on the many who have thanked me over the years for making classroom order a priority. They report that some instructors do not admonish disruptors, leaving frustrated victims to bear that awkward task themselves or suffer silently. It makes sense that serious students would endorse these guidelines. What might be surprising are examples of reactions from some of the offenders that I’ve confronted.

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What’s an Empowered Student?

What’s an Empowered Student? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

That was the question, followed by, “Are they students who want to take over the classroom?” “No,” I replied, “it’s about how students approach learning—motivated, confident, and ready to tackle the task.”

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The problem is not the students. - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The problem is not the students. - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

I have learned that whenever I post something about flipped learning or anything else that is not standard lecture, I will get comments from folks whose words make it painfully clear that their work in higher education would be a lot easier if it weren’t for all those damned students. To those people, I would just like to say a few things.

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From Rusty to Robust: Overcoming the Challenges to Effective Faculty Development

From Rusty to Robust: Overcoming the Challenges to Effective Faculty Development | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
The past 10 years have witnessed some massive growing pains in education. Nearly all aspects at all levels have been touched by efforts to reform in an attempt to create meaningful learning opportunities for today’s students. New tools, skills, approaches, and media have redefined the way we create those experiences, and educators who don’t learn and engage in them will see themselves become increasingly irrelevant. In short, faculty development now more than ever is necessary to an institution’s viability.
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Encouraging Online Learner Participation

Encouraging Online Learner Participation | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Sustained, high-quality student participation usually doesn’t happen on its own in the online learning environment. The instructor needs to model participation, create assignments that encourage it, and foster an environment that supports it. Here are some ways that I promote student participation in my online courses.
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Can You Flip an Online Class?

Can You Flip an Online Class? | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it

The flipped classroom has been defined as reversing what happens “in” and “out” of the classroom. Some scholars define the flip even more specifically as reversing homework and lectures where students watch videos of lectures for homework “out of class” and then engage in problem-solving and analysis “in class”.

 

But what happens when we apply this flipped model to an online class? The “in” class and “out of class” terminology doesn’t work. In the online class, what exactly is “class time” and what is “before class time”? If the definition of the flipped classroom always distinguishes between “in class” and “out of class”, how can we apply the flipped approach to an online class? This is why we need to expand the definition of the flip.

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6 Ways to Be a Better Online Teacher -- Campus Technology

6 Ways to Be a Better Online Teacher -- Campus Technology | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
With more and more faculty being asked to teach blended or online courses, the need for faculty training has never been higher. CT looks at tried-and-tested strategies for molding better online instructors.
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Five Pedagogical Practices to Improve Your Online Course

Five Pedagogical Practices to Improve Your Online Course | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Because online courses have fewer opportunities for the spontaneous, real-time exchanges of the face-to-face classroom, online instruction requires a deliberate approach to design and facilitation. As Bethany Simunich says, “Online, learning doesn’t happen by chance.” In an interview with Online Classroom, Simunich, associate director of online learning at Kent State University, offered the following techniques to improve an online course:
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Daydreaming or Deep in Thought? Using Formative Assessment to Evaluate Student Participation

Daydreaming or Deep in Thought? Using Formative Assessment to Evaluate Student Participation | Teaching strategies for the college classroom | Scoop.it
Many instructors will argue that student participation in class is important. But what’s the difference between participation and engagement? What does good participation or engagement look like? How can you recognize it? And how can you tell if a student is not engaged?
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