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Spider-Man, Rhino and What It Takes to Power an Exoskeleton | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Spider-Man, Rhino and What It Takes to Power an Exoskeleton | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Teaching Science Matters | Scoop.it
“Get your mechanized mitts in the air!”

— Spider-Man to Rhino in The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014 Sony Pictures)

Created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko and ...
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A team headed by Dr. Max Donelan at Simon Fraser University developed a device—one of TIME Magazine’s Top 50 best inventions of 2008—that’s strapped around the knee. This “bionic power” energy harvester is basically a frame and generator system mounted on a modified orthopedic knee brace. 


Other Exoskeletons that we have seen in the movies worn by the main character, Damon, in Elysium.


We'll likely to start to see exoskeletons being used in construction and the military in the near future.

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Humans and squids evolved the same eyes using the same genes - Phys.Org

Humans and squids evolved the same eyes using the same genes - Phys.Org | Teaching Science Matters | Scoop.it
Phys.Org
Humans and squids evolved the same eyes using the same genes
Phys.Org
Eyes and wings are among the most stunning innovations evolution has created. Remarkably these features have evolved multiple times in different lineages of animals.
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In a new study, published in Nature's Scientific Reports, researchers have found that, despite belonging to completely different lineages, humans and squid evolved through tweaks to the same gene.


Today the legacy of that early Pax6 gene lives on in an incredible diversity of organisms, from birds and bees, to shellfish and whales, from squid to you and me. This means the Pax6 gene predates the evolutionary diversification of these lineages – during the Cambrian period, some 500m years ago.


Cephalopods have a camera eye with the same features as the vertebrate camera eye. Importantly, the cephalopod camera eye arose completely independently from ours. The last common ancestor of cephalopods and vertebrates existed more than 500m years ago.

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Code Camp empowers high school girls with computer science ...

Code Camp empowers high school girls with computer science ... | Teaching Science Matters | Scoop.it
The all-day event, which took place in the Hewlett Teaching Center and the Gates Computer Science Building, was Stanford's second Code Camp, according to GTGTC founder and coordinator Heidi Wang '14. Code Camp is ...
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Girls Teach Girls To Code (GTGTC), a program sponsored by the Computer Science Department at Stanford, hosted over 200 high school girls on campus for a “Code Camp” that aimed to introduce them to the various real-life applications of computer science.

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The First American in Space Wore a Pee-Soaked Spacesuit

The First American in Space Wore a Pee-Soaked Spacesuit | Teaching Science Matters | Scoop.it
“Fifty three years ago on May 5, 1961, NASA astronaut Alan Shepard blasted off in a Freedom 7 capsule atop a Mercury-Redstone rocket to become the first American in space. Though...”
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NASA also learned a lesson: Never send someone to space without a "plan pee." Shortly after that first flight, the agency hired James McBarron to oversee the company that designed the spacesuit and add a urinary collection device.
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Fossils shed light on very different world | Science/Technology | NewsObserver.com

Fossils shed light on very different world | Science/Technology | NewsObserver.com | Teaching Science Matters | Scoop.it
The oldest fossils in North Carolina? They’re impressions of soft-bodied marine organisms from 547 million years ago
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Approximately 547 million years in the past, the world was different from the one we inhabit. Imagine a world with no mammals, no birds, not even a cockroach. There was no terrestrial life to speak of, yet the oceans were teeming with living organisms.


These fossils are not really all that exciting, definitely not like the T-Rex or big dinosaur fossils we see at the museum, but they were the foundation of life on Earth.  Paleontologists working in this field have to think differently about the animals that they study from the past. 
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ESA Science & Technology: Delving through the Milky Way with Planck

ESA Science & Technology: Delving through the Milky Way with Planck | Teaching Science Matters | Scoop.it

Data from Planck were used to compile maps of the various components of the ISM, revealing in the process some new players contributing to our Galaxy's emission.

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The image, assembled with data from the Planck satellite and released on Tuesday by the European Space Agency, depicts a wraparound view of the Milky Way.


Most recent magnetic image on the ESA site.

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Polls don’t identify the real science education problem | Science News

Polls don’t identify the real science education problem | Science News | Teaching Science Matters | Scoop.it
“Concerns that Americans do poorly when quizzed on factual scientific knowledge don’t address deeper issues of scientific understanding. ("Rarely will people responding to a poll admit their ignorance.”
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A recent Associated Press poll, for instance, found that only 21 percent of the American adults questioned were “extremely” or “very” confident that “the universe began 13.8 billion years ago with a big bang.”
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Spidey science: 4 bits of real science in 'The Amazing Spider-Man 2' - Fox News

Spidey science: 4 bits of real science in 'The Amazing Spider-Man 2' - Fox News | Teaching Science Matters | Scoop.it
Spidey science: 4 bits of real science in 'The Amazing Spider-Man 2'
Fox News
From modern laboratories to genetic engineering, the new "Spider-Man" movie is packed full of extreme, cutting edge and mostly fictional science.
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Exoskeletons, science lab setups and gene manipulation. Real-life scientists have grown cartilage in the shape of a human ear on the back of a mouse. 

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