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Technology for flipping the classroom


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 6, 10:13 AM

I'm always drawn to tips and I like to watch for trends. The Flipped classroom is certainly on everyone's mind! 

liblist4u's curator insight, June 12, 9:38 AM

Technologies for flipped classrooms that can also be implemented by academic librarians.

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Ten crucial steps for implementing new technology in your classroom

Ten crucial steps for implementing new technology in your classroom | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
So, you want to use that new app, site, web tool, gizmo, or doo-dad in the classroom? That's great! Now what? Using a process to vet, research, and test a new addition to your repertoire is crucial...

Via Beth Dichter
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:
Beth Dichter's insight:

Technology changes rapidly and many want to jump on the bandwagon quickly, but before we bring new technology into our classroom we need to learn to use it and determine if it will help move students to a new level. One of my favorite saying is that technology should not be used simply to use technology, but to reinforce, enhance and extend the curriculum. This post provides ten excellent points that we should consider before bringing in the next cool tool that we discover. Four are listed below.

* Identify and verify

* Do some real research

* Write a rationale for use

* Build norms and expectations for use

Each of the points has additional information. Click through to the post to learn more.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 16, 2013 8:27 PM

Technology changes rapidly and many want to jump on the bandwagon quickly, but before we bring new technology into our classroom we need to learn to use it and determine if it will help move students to a new level. One of my favorite saying is that technology should not be used simply to use technology, but to reinforce, enhance and extend the curriculum. This post provides ten excellent points that we should consider before bringing in the next cool tool that we discover. Four are listed below.

* Identify and verify

* Do some real research

* Write a rationale for use

* Build norms and expectations for use

Each of the points has additional information. Click through to the post to learn more.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, September 16, 2013 9:09 PM

Thanks, Bth. Good advice.

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20 Ways To Use PowerPoint With Bloom's Taxonomy

20 Ways To Use PowerPoint With Bloom's Taxonomy | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
I would wager a guess that the majority of teachers uses PowerPoint as a way to present information and lecture in class. In fact, PowerPoint has been under a lot of flack lately for being tired, d...

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Sue Blough's comment, June 21, 2013 4:23 PM
This article is relevant to idea of engaging students in multiple ways and multiple intelligences. Good food for thought.
Alfredo Corell's curator insight, June 23, 2013 7:47 AM

New ways we might use PowerPoint in our classroom.

 

jorganiser's curator insight, September 1, 9:55 AM

Two of my favourite things in a table - with bold words too!  Where does each task sit on the SAMR model I wonder?

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Ballpoint pens…the ruin of education in our country | 1 to 1 Schools

Ballpoint pens…the ruin of education in our country | 1 to 1 Schools | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

quotes from Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology

 

"From a principal’s pub­li­ca­tion in 1815: “Stu­dents today depend on paper too much. They don’t know how to write on a slate with­out get­ting chalk dust all over them­selves. They can’t clean a slate prop­erly. What will they do when they run out of paper?”

 

From the jour­nal of the National Asso­ci­a­tion of Teach­ers, 1907: “Stu­dents today depend too much upon ink. They don’t know how to use a pen knife to sharpen a pen­cil. Pen and ink will never replace the pencil.”

 

From Rural Amer­i­can Teacher, 1928: “Stu­dents today depend upon store bought ink. They don’t know how to make their own. When they run out of ink they will be unable to write words or ciphers until their next trip to the set­tle­ment. This is a sad com­men­tary on mod­ern education.”

 

From Fed­eral Teach­ers, 1950: “Ball­point pens will be the ruin of edu­ca­tion in our coun­try. Stu­dents use these devices and then throw them away. The Amer­i­can val­ues of thrift and fru­gal­ity are being dis­carded. Busi­nesses and banks will never allow such expen­sive luxuries.”

 

From a sci­ence fair judge in Apple Class­room of Tomor­row chron­i­cles, 1988: “Com­put­ers give stu­dents an unfair advan­tage. There­fore, stu­dents who used com­put­ers to ana­lyze data or cre­ate dis­plays will be elim­i­nated from the sci­ence fair.”


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Building blocks that blink, beep and teach | Video on TED.com

Building blocks that blink, beep and teach | Video on TED.com | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Imagine a set of electronics as easy to play with as Legos. TED Fellow Ayah Bdeir introduces littleBits, a set of simple, interchangeable blocks that make programming as simple and important a part of creativity as snapping blocks together.

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Educator as Model Learner

Educator as Model Learner | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The educator's role has or should change in this age of information abundance or Education 2.0-3.0.  The educator's role has always been to model and demonstrate effective learning, but  somewhere ...

Via Beth Dichter
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Some good resources here. 

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 14, 5:34 AM

The world is changing at an ever growing pace and in todays world students need to learn "how to learn." How do we as teachers help our students learn "how to learn"? By modeling it in our daily work with our students we can instill the skills and help them understand that we too are in the process of learning. 

Jackie Gerstein provides a post that explores how our roles are changing and how the roles of our learners are chaning because of Education 2.0-3.0 (with a link to a post that describes this).  

What does "teaching the process of learning" mean? A few of her points are below:

  • Modeling of learning processes needs to be intentional, strategic, and overt.
  • The educator should be familiar with and able to demonstrate metacognitive processe.
There are two additional points (well worth reading) as well as three points on shifts that need to be made for this to occur. As always Gerstein brings up an issue, provides insight into the issue as well as links to additional resources, and make you sit back and think about your teaching and your classroom.
LibrarianLand's curator insight, April 14, 9:25 AM

I especially like the idea of modeling by explaining what thought processes one is going through when demonstrating or learning a task. It could be helpful to apply this when demonstrating how to do research or how to search a database.

Fadilah's curator insight, September 5, 12:49 AM

Interesting.

 

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5 Things Students Expect From Their Teachers

5 Things Students Expect From Their Teachers | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Is there "a difference between a 'student' and a 'learner,' between a 'teacher' and an 'educator.'
Teachers want their students to be responsible and curious. They expect their students to follow class rules and do their homework. But what about the reverse? What do students want from their teachers?"

 


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Sue Alexander's curator insight, August 17, 2013 10:51 AM

Some wonderful questions that I look forward to answering.

Allan Shaw's curator insight, August 19, 2013 1:36 AM

I consider points two and three absolutely necessary! Points one, four and five are more difficult to maintain for six hours per day each day of the school year for all students.

Beatriz Montesinos's curator insight, August 20, 2013 12:42 PM

¿Hay diferencia entre "alumno" y "aprendiz" y entre "profesor" y "educador"?

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This Is Your Brain On The Internet

This Is Your Brain On The Internet | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Is the internet and social media influencing your brain? Documentary filmmaker Tiffany Shlain investigates our changing behaviors in the connected world.

How do media and technology impact our brain? According to a "a recent study, Dr. Small observed brain activity in two groups of subjects interacting with a search engine –one that was 'net-savvy' and one that was 'net naïve'. The results showed increased brain activity in the experienced netizens, reflecting Shlain’s hypothesis that our online behaviors stimulate more brain systems."

For more information and to view a video on "our connected world" click through to the article.


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Education Update: How To Master the Art of Communication: Engage Students by Embracing Technology

Education Update: How To Master the Art of Communication: Engage Students by Embracing Technology | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

"...we need to find a way to embrace all forms of technology in the classroom and use them to our advantage. By training students to use technology appropriately and effectively and providing opportunities for them to reach learning targets through its usage, we create a situation in which students are engaged in learning. We also free ourselves from the constant cycle of fighting against students."


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