Teaching in Higher Education
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A Scientist Predicts the Future

A Scientist Predicts the Future | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

When making predictions, I have two criteria: the laws of physics must be obeyed and prototypes must exist that demonstrate “proof of principle.” I’ve interviewed more than 300 of the world’s top scientists, and many allowed me into laboratories where they are inventing the future. Their accomplishments and dreams are eye-opening. From my conversations with them, here’s a glimpse of what to expect in the coming decades:


Via Pierre Tran
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Teresa Lima's curator insight, January 10, 2014 4:38 AM

#Not 

I think the future is unpredictable, and no one  can predict the future!

Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, January 16, 2014 7:38 AM

Predicción científica del futuro, esto es un tema a leer por lo menos.

Jesús Martinez's curator insight, January 18, 2014 8:07 AM

add your insight...

Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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How the Brain Learns from Mistakes - Dana Foundation

How the Brain Learns from Mistakes - Dana Foundation | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

"Imagine renting a car in the United Kingdom. Though you may be an experienced driver on American soil, making the switch to the “wrong” side of the road can be a bit of a challenge. You have to remain vigilant and pay close attention to the new rules, as well as inhibit your automatic tendency to want to drive on the right. Chances are, you will also make a few mistakes at first or as you grow tired.Common wisdom holds that we learn best from our mistakes. But researchers at Michigan State University have published a new study that suggests something more is needed: We must be conscious of our mistakes to reap the benefits of improved performance."

 


Via Maggie Rouman, Dennis T OConnor
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Fitter Body, Fitter Brain: How Working Out Can Make You Smarter - Online College Courses

Fitter Body, Fitter Brain: How Working Out Can Make You Smarter - Online College Courses | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Getting the proper amount of exercise is one of the most important elements to maintaining a healthy, happy lifestyle.

Only about "12% of students get the recommended amount of exercise for a healthy state of being...consider the benefits that a great workout can have on your smarts. Studies show that exercising doesn't just boost your health, it can also boost your intelligence and mental acuity. From elementary school all the way through college-level education, regular exercise is seen to improve test scores and even IQ levels. In fact, working out right before a test can aid in boosting performance."


Via Beth Dichter
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It's not solitaire: Brain activity differs when one plays against others

It's not solitaire: Brain activity differs when one plays against others | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Researchers have found a way to study how our brains assess the behavior -- and likely future actions -- of others during competitive social interactions.

Via Dimitris Agorastos
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Teaching & Learning - Brain-Based Online Learning Design - Magna Publications

Teaching & Learning - Brain-Based Online Learning Design - Magna Publications | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Abreena Tompkins, instruction specialist at Surry Community College, has developed a brain-based online course design model based on a meta-analysis of more than 300 articles. In this study, she distilled the following elements of brain-based course design:

Low-risk, nonthreatening learning environment Challenging, real-life, authentic assessments Rhythms, patterns, and cycles Appropriate chunking or grouping Learning as orchestration rather than lecture or facilitation Appropriate level of novelty Appropriately timed breaks and learning periods Purposeful assessments Learning that addresses visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners Active processing with mental models The use of universal examples, analogies, and parallel processing


Via Dennis T OConnor, Patty Ball, Louise Robinson-Lay
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Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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neuroeducation, cognitive neuroscience, teaching, psychology, learning, pedagogy

neuroeducation, cognitive neuroscience, teaching, psychology, learning, pedagogy | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
This article explains how Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) science combines perspectives from neuroscience, psychology and pedagogy that contribute to a better understanding of how humans learn, and consequently, how we should teach.

 

Similar to other evolutionary processes, MBE science drew from the dominant “genes” of its parents to produce a better-adapted being. That is, rather than including anything and everything that falls under the labels of education, neuroscience, and psychology as a whole, MBE science is a careful selection of only the best information that can inform the new science of teaching and learning.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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3 Ways To Productively Rest Your Brain

3 Ways To Productively Rest Your Brain | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

By Matthew E. May

 

"Neuroscientific research is beginning to shed light on the idea that to be more productive and creative, we need to make break-taking a regular practice. In his recent bestselling book Imagine: How Creativity Works, Jonah Lehrer writes:

 

“While it’s commonly assumed that the best way to solve a difficult problem is to relentlessly focus, this clenched state of mind comes with a hidden cost: it inhibits the sort of creative connections that lead to breakthroughs. We suppress the very type of brain activity that should be encouraged.”

 

"The challenge, though, is that we’re generally reticent to take those breaks, especially when it comes to our work and business. But many of us might not know an effective brain-rest technique aside from the obvious (take deep breaths, close your eyes) and the time-consuming (who has time to meditate for hours or take yoga three days a week?). So here are three targeted, quick and easy ways to rest your brain and maximize productivity."


Via Jim Lerman, Gust MEES
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