Teaching in Higher Education
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Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D. from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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Understanding Cheating in Online Courses

Understanding Cheating in Online Courses | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Live Events, Twitter Feeds, Chat Rooms, and other resources for the Understanding Cheating in Online Courses MOOC (Massively Open Online Course)

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, June 10, 2014 1:52 AM

Clever Mooc Style open course on cheating in the online environment. All course modules are open and available to you. 


The hastag for this course is #cheatmooc .  Clever, and provocative; can you cheat your way through a mooc? Why would you? What would be gained?  Lots to think about here.

Maryalice Leister's curator insight, June 13, 2014 7:35 AM

Cheating in online coursework remains a hot topic. Take another look at the issue here.

Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D. from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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The Keyword Blog: Detecting Plagiarism: A MentorMob E-Learning Unit

The Keyword Blog: Detecting Plagiarism: A MentorMob E-Learning Unit | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

I learned about MentorMob when I spoke with Joyce Valenza at ISTE 2012. When Joyce speaks, I listen. This experimental lesson is my first use of MentorMob. Give it a try!

 

 


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D. from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Art's Emotions: Ethics, Expression and Aesthetic Experience

Art's Emotions: Ethics, Expression and Aesthetic Experience | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews is an electronic, peer-reviewed journal that publishes timely reviews of scholarly philosophy books.

 

Damien Freeman takes on the monumental task of developing a theory of aesthetic experience that accounts for its emotional aspects, its ethical aspects, and the role certain kinds of aesthetic experience can play in a fulfilling life. Despite the enormity of the task, he does an excellent job in so few pages. There are, of course, problems, but the issues that I take with the argument are largely in the details and not in the big picture.

 

Freeman's main argument is that aesthetic experience can uniquely offer a form of what he calls a plenary experience of emotion. This particular kind of experience is significant to the aesthetic experience because it deals with our emotions as a whole (what he calls the whole emotional economy rather than just parts of the emotions) and thereby offers a unique kind of experience that plays a significant role in our overall thriving emotional life.

 

Freeman's argument takes as its context the expressivist theories of Tolstoy, Collingwood, and Wollheim; but I believe that he advances his argument to a more comprehensive account of the ways in which we engage with art emotionally and why it is good for us to do so.

 

Read more, very interesting...:

http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/32199-art-s-emotions-ethics-expression-and-aesthetic-experience/

 


Via Gust MEES
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Patrizia Splendiani's comment, July 30, 2012 3:37 AM
Hi; about my suggestion, in italian, it was my mistake... Sorry!
Gust MEES's comment, July 30, 2012 6:01 AM
@Patrizia Splendiani,

Hi Patrizia, don't worry, it's OK. I already publish in English, French and German and that's a lot of work; can't publish more languages ;)

Have a nice day,
Gust
Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D. from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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The Ethics and Responsibilities of the 21st Century Classroom: Part One

The Ethics and Responsibilities of the 21st Century Classroom: Part One | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

When I think about the “ethics and responsibilities of the 21st century classroom,” I think not only about our ethical responsibilities toward students but about our ethical responsibilities toward teachers. I am very concerned that the drop-out rate of K-12 teachers is even higher than the drop-out rate of K-12 students in the U.S. and in many other countries around the world.

 

As I’ve gone around the U.S. and abroad talking with teachers, I’ve seen over and over how beleaguered they are: by (a) too many rules, (b) too many constantly-changing systems and theories, by (c) too many “learning objectives,” by (d) too much pressure to deliver “content,” by (e) too many expectations about high test scores (on standardized tests that often do not measure real learning and content), by (f) ever-escalating and rigid standards of “accountability,” and, added to all of this, by (g) too much faddish, expensive new technology dumped not only on kids but on teachers as if the technology itself magically will take care of a, b, c, d, e, and f.

 

Read more...

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES
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