Teaching in Highe...
Follow
Find tag "Critical-Thinking"
8.1K views | +3 today
Focusing on effective teaching practices for the 21st century student
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions

How to Train Your Mind to Think Critically and Form Your Own Opinions | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
"Critical Thinking" may sound like an obnoxious buzzword from liberal arts schools, but it's actually a useful skill. Critical thinking just means absorbing important information and using that to form a decision or opinion of your own--rather than just spouting off what you hear others say. This doesn't always come naturally to us, but luckily, it's something you can train yourself to do better.

 

Critical thinking doesn't end. The more knowledge you cultivate, the better you'll become at thinking about it. It's navel gazing in that you're constantly thinking about thinking, but the end result is a brain that automatically forms better arguments, focused ideas, and creative solutions to problems.



Via Gust MEES
more...
Brent MacKinnon's curator insight, February 9, 5:18 AM

A very practical description with examples of ways to become better in your critical thinking. A good primer for sense making as part of the PKM framework.

Terry Doherty's curator insight, February 15, 5:00 PM

"Navel gazing." I haven't heard that term in ages ... and don't do it near enough.

 

Todd Bratcher's curator insight, February 18, 3:46 PM

Critical thinking means to ask questions that need to be asked. it involves finding the significance in every piece of information you come across and formulating opinions and plans of action. You have to ask the tough questions and the best one to start with is "Why?" Critical thinking is about being curious and allowing your sense of curiosity to follow the "why".Often times following the why will lead to finding the truths and finding lies. Critical thinking is also about honing in ones BS detector. Take time to analyze information before accepting it's credibility.

Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How to Develop 5 Critical Thinking Types - Forbes

How to Develop 5 Critical Thinking Types - Forbes | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Great leaders think strategically. They can understand and appreciate the current state as well as see possibilities.

 

- Critical thinking is the mental process of objectively analyzing a situation by gathering information from all possible sources, and then evaluating both the tangible and intangible aspects, as well as the implications of any course of action.

 
- Implementation thinking is the ability to organize ideas and plans in a way that they will be effectively carried out.


- Conceptual thinking consists of the ability to find connections or patterns between abstract ideas and then piece them together to form a complete picture.


- Innovative thinking involves generating new ideas or new ways of approaching things to create possibilities and opportunities. 


- Intuitive thinking is the ability to take what you may sense or perceive to be true and, without knowledge or evidence, appropriately factor it in to the final decision.

 

Read more, a MUST:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/work-in-progress/2012/03/27/how-to-develop-5-critical-thinking-types/

 


Via Jess Chalmers, Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's comment, August 9, 2012 3:50 PM
Hi rosemary,

I made a Typo, sorry. I forgot the "a" in "Red more", please add it, thx in advance.

greetings,
Gust
Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Everything You Wanted to Know (and More) About Critical Thinking

Everything You Wanted to Know (and More) About Critical Thinking | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

A website providing a rigorous introduction to critical thinking.The purpose of this website is to provide a rigorous source of critical thinking information of value to many different communities. CriticalThinking.NET has been developed by Robert H. Ennis and Sean F. Ennis.

 

Gust MEES: A MUST READ

 

Read more:

http://www.criticalthinking.net/index.html

 


Via Andrea Zeitz, Gust MEES
more...
Tuba Angay-Crowder's comment, May 26, 2012 7:19 AM
i love it! thank you so much. I will use it in my class.. this summer, I am teaching "Freakonomics" to them, and it is perfect time to introduce the site..
Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Overloaded with information, students need critical thinking skills - University World News

Overloaded with information, students need critical thinking skills - University World News | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Students today have unprecedented access to information. According to educator Karl Fisch, in one week of reading The New York Times, an individual will encounter more information than people in the 18th century would have had access to during the entire course of their lives.

 

It is not surprising that in this atmosphere, students appear to be growing increasingly dogmatic and are less able to engage in civil discourse with others with whom they disagree. Perhaps this is because they cannot accurately explain what people who oppose them actually believe. In truth, they often lack consistency in their own beliefs as well.

 

 

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
I am interested in this post and post on critical thinking. Is critical thinking a skill?  Can one teach critical thinking? Stephen has delivered the course on Critical Literacies MOOC in the past....

 

Robert H. Ennis, Author of The Cornell Critical Thinking Tests
“Critical thinking is reasonable, reflective thinking that is focused on deciding what to believe and do.”

 

Assuming that critical thinking is reasonable reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do, a critical thinker:

 

1. Is open-minded and mindful of alternatives
2. Tries to be well-informed
3. Judges well the credibility of sources
4. Identifies conclusions, reasons, and assumptions
5. Judges well the quality of an argument, including the acceptability of its reasons, assumptions, and evidence
6. Can well develop and defend a reasonable position
7. Asks appropriate clarifying questions
8. Formulates plausible hypotheses; plans experiments well
9. Defines terms in a way appropriate for the context
10. Draws conclusions when warranted, but with caution
11. Integrates all items in this list when deciding what to believe or do

 

What are the principles of critical thinking?

 

- Knowledge is acquired only through thinking, reasoning, and questioning. Knowledge is based on facts.


- It is only from learning how to think that you learn what to think.


- Critical thinking is an organized and systematic process used to judge the effectiveness of an argument.


- Critical thinking is a search for meaning.


- Critical thinking is a skill that can be learned.


- Do the above principles hold true and won’t change from one domain to the next?

 

Read more, very interesting:

http://suifaijohnmak.wordpress.com/2012/09/16/critical-thinking-2/

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES
more...
David Luigi FUSCHI's comment, April 9, 2013 12:21 AM
Are we sure that Critical Thinking is really appreciated as it should? In my personal experience critical thinker are often opposed if not hunted. Deciding to be a critical thinker may have a high price especially in certain context like industry or management. Definitely it brings better results and can easily foster innovation, but it is hated by man of power and yes-men. I pride myself of constantly trying to be a critical thinker and most of all to be critical of myself and my actions, but I have to say that this has taken me quite a toll in my life, yet I do not regret it. Sorry for stepping in, I do hope this two-penny thought could help in sparkle some discussion on how to foster critical thinking.
Ajo Monzó's comment, April 9, 2013 12:32 AM
Hello David, I agree with you, to be a critical thinker sometimes can be even dangerous, buttheyare the people who move the world...thanks a lot for your comment!
Monica Gutiérrez's curator insight, March 4, 9:54 AM

#criticalthinking 

Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking in Asynchronous Discussions

Critical Thinking in Asynchronous Discussions | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Editor’s Note: Greg Walker applies critical thinking theory and practice to asynchronous online discussions. As with the Murchu and Muirhead article, he explains the importance of writing, vocabulary, and reflection, and activities such as questioning and role plays. He also explores the facilitator role and how this differs in asynchronous online as compare to traditional classroom activities.


Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

How writers can learn to accept criticism

How writers can learn to accept criticism | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
These tips are intended help novice writers learn to take criticism from instructors, peer reviewers and editors.

 

Start with the assumption that your work can be improved


The biggest mistake writers make is assuming that once they have submitted a piece of writing, that is finished… and perfect. This assumption sets the writer up for a frustration and anger when it is returned with a request for revisions. It can be helpful to approach your writing from the point of view there is always room for improvement.

 

Read more...

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES
more...
No comment yet.