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Find and Drop Images, Quotes and Info References Into Your Presentations with the New Google Research Tool

Find and Drop Images, Quotes and Info References Into Your Presentations with the New Google Research Tool | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

 

Robin Good: I used to love the Google contextual mini-browser (the Google Deskbar - 2003), something probably most people today have never seen nor have a memory of, but which in my humble opinion, was one of the best and most useful tools released by Google ever.

 

Well the little mini-search tool is back in a new customized format inside the Google Docs Presentation tool, where you can now easily search for reference, quotes, information and images related to the topic you are working on in your presentation.

 

Search becomes contextual and the relevant information found can be immediately integrated into the work we are creating. (Any information or image you find with the Google Research Tool can be intuitively selected and dragged onto the slide area, where it can be sized and positioned in any way you like.)

 

Each content item found with the Google Research Tool and utilized in your slide content is automatically linked back to its original source to simplify the credit and attribution process.

 

Extremely useful. Especially for quotes and images.

 

More info: http://support.google.com/drive/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=2481802

 

Try it out now inside your Google Docs / Drive account: https://drive.google.com/

 

 


Via Robin Good, Jim Lerman, Louise Robinson-Lay
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Nedko Aldev's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:51 AM

add your insight...

 
Focusing on effective teaching practices for the 21st century student
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5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
To inspire more inquiry in the classroom, blogger Rebecca Alber offers up five questions to routinely ask students.
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Wonderful questions. I think for higher ed, we can look a little more at the Socratic method for some deeper questions, but these are still useful. 

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5 Ways Video Conferencing Brings Exciting Collaboration To Learning

5 Ways Video Conferencing Brings Exciting Collaboration To Learning | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Open up Your Classroom to the World With Video Conferencing Many of us are familiar with the use of computers, iPads, Smart Boards, and other technological

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Most of these suggestions are fairly obvious, but this can help spur some thinking on the many ways to use this wonderful tool. Video conferencing brings the world to your classroom and the classroom to the world!

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Елена Гончарова's curator insight, August 20, 4:59 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Deborah Rinio's curator insight, August 20, 8:20 AM

Looking for ways to bring experts into the classroom? Ask the librarian! There are tons of great resources out there and people and places that would love to share with you, from veterans to scientists to authors. Invite the world in!

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 20, 4:41 PM

Video Conferencia. Interacción colaborativa.

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Reality Check: Helping to Manage Student Expectations

Reality Check: Helping to Manage Student Expectations | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Most students begin college, the academic year, and new courses motivated and optimistic. Many first-year students expect to do well because they were successful in high school. Some are right, but others will only find similar success if they work much harder than they did in high school. Yet most start out expending the same level of effort. They will talk with their classmates and convince each other that an exam covering three chapters can’t be that hard, so they put off studying and then “look over” the chapters the night before— happily dealing with any and all interruptions and distractions.
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The Future of College?

The Future of College? | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A brash tech entrepreneur thinks he can reinvent higher education by stripping it down to its essence, eliminating lectures and tenure along with football games, ivy-covered buildings, and research libraries. What if he's right? 
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

A provocative article. The comments section provide even more food for thought. 

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Using "Mulligans" to Enhance Student Participation and Reduce Test Anxiety

Using "Mulligans" to Enhance Student Participation and Reduce Test Anxiety | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
When I speak with other professors who work extensively in the classroom, we often find that we share many of the same challenges. Students’ lack of classroom participation in discussion and test anxiety are two of the most common. Many professors try to mitigate these issues through two time-honored pedagogical tactics: a participation grade and extra credit questions on tests. While both tactics can be effective, by applying concepts from gamification research I found a way to both enhance classroom participation and reduce test anxiety with one simple technique.
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Not sure how I feel about this idea, but it's interesting. 

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10 Remarkably Free Digital Tools for Educators and Students

10 Remarkably Free Digital Tools for Educators and Students | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
1) Hemingway Editor This is a free Web-based app that lets you paste in your writing to be analyzed and edited for optimal readability. The app quickly ide

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Not all are free, but there are some wonderful apps on this list. 

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Maryalice Leister's curator insight, August 17, 5:48 PM

Some new ones listed I hadn't heard of or used. I am off to try them out and you'll have some great new tools if you do too. Easily learned and creates the impact you want. Not just for teachers either. Enjoy!

ExamTime's comment, August 18, 1:35 AM
Have you tried out www.examtime.com? It's a free elearning site with Mind Maps, Flashcards, Study Planner and more tools which allow for collaboration, testing of knowledge and learning in a fun, creative way.
ExamTime's comment, August 18, 1:35 AM
Have you tried out www.examtime.com? It's a free elearning site with Mind Maps, Flashcards, Study Planner and more tools which allow for collaboration, testing of knowledge and learning in a fun, creative way.
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Random Name Generator

Random Name Generator | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
This tool will randomly draw names from your class list. Supports group of up to 100.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Useful for assigning teams. 

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Suvi Salo's curator insight, August 17, 12:12 AM

Ei taida hyväksyä ääkkösiä.

Anne E's curator insight, August 17, 12:56 AM

Plutôt bien pour former des groupes différents (de 2, de 3, de 4, ...).

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Google Drive in Class: 38 Ideas

Google Drive in Class:  38 Ideas | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

August 11, 2014
This is the third post in a series of posts aimed at helping teachers and educators make the best out of Google Drive in classrooms. This series comes in a time when teachers are getting ready to start a new school year and hopefully will provide them with the necessary know-how to help them better integrate Google Drive in their teaching pedagogy. The two previous posts featured in this series were entitled consecutively "New Google Drive Cheat Sheet" and "Teachers Visual Guide to Google Drive Sharing". Today's post covers some interesting ideas and tips on how to go about using Google Drive in your classroom. This work is created by Sean Junkins from SeansDesk.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Gary Harwell's curator insight, August 15, 8:17 PM

Are we using Drive in our classes? We shoudl be.

Judith Edwards's curator insight, August 16, 11:39 AM

Just found this great Scoop by our own Sean Junkins.

Steve Vaitl's curator insight, August 19, 10:22 AM

With a bit of imagination, some of these can be altered to fit business needs as well!!

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The Guide to Keeping Up With Google

The Guide to Keeping Up With Google | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Hashtags, Twitter, G+, Communities, Blogs and YouTube Channels You Should Follow! I often get asked, “How do you keep up with Google?” Well, first let me say that it’s almost impossible!...
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Ten Tips for Effective Virtual Delivery

Ten Tips for Effective Virtual Delivery | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Follow these ten tips from Jennifer Tomarchio to avoid the pitfalls of VILT and maximize your effectiveness.
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Great tips for doing a real time webinar. 

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Creating interactivities in e-Learning: 10 ways to challenge and engage your Learner

Creating interactivities in e-Learning: 10 ways to challenge and engage your Learner | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Lets be honest – Learning is not always an activity we look forward to. Trainings can be monotonous, especially in the context of ‘pure’ technology-aided learning. You do not have an instructor
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Some great ideas here. 

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Motivating Students: Should Effort Count?

Motivating Students: Should Effort Count? | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
I’ve always said no, effort shouldn’t count. When students pleaded, “but I worked so hard,” or “I studied so long,” I would respond with the clichéd quip about people with brain tumors not wanting surgeons who try hard. Besides if students try hard, if they do their assignments, come to class, take notes, ask questions, and study on more nights than the one before the exam, that effort will pay off. They will learn the material, and their grades will reflect that learning.
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Not sure I agree with this, but worth a read. 

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Can Universities Use Data to Fix What Ails the Lecture?

Can Universities Use Data to Fix What Ails the Lecture? | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
In a culture of accountability, universities call on technology to collect information about student participation in the classroom.
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

It's too early to make any conclusions, but this is interesting. What will we do with the data once we have it, is a question that is worth considering. 

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5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Asking a question can be a scary step into the void. How do you create a culture of using questioning in the classroom?
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Some great tips on an always challenging issue -- how to get students to ask questions.

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Concept Mapping/Graphic Organizers

Concept Mapping/Graphic Organizers | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

"Reading Rockets shares that "A concept map is a visual organizer that can enrich students' understanding of a new concept. Using a graphic organizer, students think about the concept in several ways. Most concept map organizers engage students in answering questions such as, "What is it? What is it like? What are some examples?" Concept maps deepen understanding and comprehension."Cast reports: "There is solid evidence for the effectiveness of graphic organizers in facilitating learning." A summary of this finding is that, "When looking across 23 different studies they found a consistent effect on comprehension."



Via Beth Dichter
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Some great links in this article to a plethora of resources. 

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 18, 6:49 PM

Graphic organizers often help students understand new concepts, and they may help students find misunderstanding or areas of weakness (and strength). This post provides:

* 7 ideas on how to use graphic organizers/concept maps in the classroom

* 5 examples of use in the classroom

* The benefits of graphic organizers

* Concept maps and assistive technology

* Multiple intelligences/learning styles supported

* Sources that provide graphic organizers including a list of online, downloadable, iDevices, Chrome extensions and printables

* A list of websites with additional information

Many great resources are available in this post.

Sample Student's curator insight, August 20, 5:15 PM

Of great use when making decisions about supporting higher order thinking in assisted learning.

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26 Questions Every Student Should Be Able To Answer

26 Questions Every Student Should Be Able To Answer | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
26 Questions Every Student Should Be Able To Answer
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Great ideas here for implementation as well. This post is about encouraging student introspection and thoughtful responses. Easily adapted to higher education. 

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How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn

How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Psychologists are finding that when students are motivated by a desire to have a positive impact on the world they are more able to plug away at challenging or tedious tasks.
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Great article. This  is one of those things we should already know -- but often don't act on. If students see a larger purpose in their lives, they want to learn and grow to achieve that purpose. 

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Seven Web-based Tools for Delivering Flipped Lessons

Seven Web-based Tools for Delivering Flipped Lessons | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

"This fall there will be teachers trying the flipped classroom approach to lessons for the first time. In the right setting the flipped classroom model can work well. My favorite tools for creating flipped lessons include the option to insert questions for students to answer while watching the video instead of waiting until the end to answer a series of questions. I also like tools that provide students with the opportunity to submit questions to their teachers while they are watching videos. These tools offer those options."


Via Beth Dichter
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

The tools covered in this post by Richard Byrne are:

* eduCanon

* Teachem

* VideoNotes

* Blubbr

* Zaption

* EdPuzzle

* Blendspace

You will find a video tutorial both eduCanon and Blendspace.Bryne describes each tool in detail in his post, making it easier for you to choose which ones will meet your needs.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 16, 4:10 PM

The tools covered in this post by Richard Byrne are:

* eduCanon

* Teachem

* VideoNotes

* Blubbr

* Zaption

* EdPuzzle

* Blendspace

You will find a video tutorial both eduCanon and Blendspace. Bryne describes each tool in detail in his post, making it easier for you to choose which ones will meet your needs.

Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, August 17, 10:41 PM

Thinking about doing some changes to what you do in the classroom? Looking for ways to differentiate for students? Maybe going to try "flipping" things a bit? Here are seven tools that you can use to make some changes to engage students in different ways. 

Kevin Atkins's curator insight, August 18, 3:03 AM

Some great tools in this article!

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A Professor's Pointers for Success in College: 21 Easy-to-Follow Tips

A Professor's Pointers for Success in College: 21 Easy-to-Follow Tips | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Here's to ivy-covered buildings, critical thinking, independence, making friends for life, asking hard questions, becoming global citizens, and discovering who you really are....
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Some great tips here to pass onto our students. 

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Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Beth Dichter's insight:

Here is another way to look at Bloom's Taxonomy. The image above is actually interactive. As you mouse over the various colored blocks each will provide information that combines Bloom's cognitive process (which many people in the field of education use daily) and also the knowledge dimension. A short phrase will pop up that can quickly lead to a learning objective.

 

There is also a table that provides 19 specific cognitive processes based on the cognitive process dimension. A second table provides information on the four knowledge dimensions, with information on the major types and subtypes.

 

Bloom's Taxonomy is widely used in education and combining these two aspects provides a more robust version of Bloom's work. If you are new to Bloom or you have used his taxonomy, this particular layout may provide you with new information.


Via Beth Dichter
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:
This is a useful tool for generating clear student outcomes. 
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Gary Harwell's curator insight, August 15, 8:15 PM

Something we should all pay attention to.

Ante Lauc's curator insight, August 15, 10:50 PM

GAU is, as me, in reprocessing and restructuring. I do believe that love and freedom will be created, but we have to be patient.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 16, 10:31 PM

This is an interesting model.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Our Favorite Presentation Resources

Our Favorite Presentation Resources | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
We decided to build a list of our favourite presentation resources divided by categories. This is a great place to start before creating your first slide.

Via Baiba Svenca
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M Dolores Solé Gómez's curator insight, August 15, 8:02 AM

Great list!

Claudie Graner's curator insight, August 17, 4:26 AM

TEDtalk and Slideshare top the list...

Yossi Elran's curator insight, August 18, 11:56 AM

Really good presentation tips here...

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2 Great Techniques for the Flipped Classroom

2 Great Techniques for the Flipped Classroom | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Inspire more student engagement in a flipped class with these two pedagogy-driven methods.

 

When Julie Schell makes a presentation on innovation in teaching and learning, she likes to share a photograph of college classroom from the 1800s. Compared to a typical classroom today, it's hard to see any substantial differences. The lesson: Educators "need to change how we teach students," she believes.

Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Interesting article. 

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The Science Behind Classroom Norming

The Science Behind Classroom Norming | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Blogger Todd Finley explores the value of Classroom Norming to help learners.

 

Celebrated teachers like Jamil Odom, Ron Clark, and Rebecca Mieliwockicreate transcendent classroom cultures year after year. It’s not magic, it’s science.

 

Our modern understanding of social norming occurred in 1936, when Muzafer Sherif studied the autokinetic effect, a phenomenon that occurs when people observe a stable light inside a dark space. After time passes, everyone "sees" the light move. Sherif, on a hunch, asked confederates to enter the room and offer a contradictory perception. The participants, without realizing they had been tricked, revised their original judgment to align with the confederates' stated perception. Later, even when participants re-entered the room alone, they continued to believe that the confederates' perceptions were correct.

Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Mainly primary school, but there are some ideas here that could easily be adapted to higher education. 

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Clarisketch - Voice annotation for images

Clarisketch - Voice annotation for images | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Through the narration and illustration of photos, Clarisketch saves time and improves the quality of messaging using a combination of photographs and annotated commentary. Clarisketch enables you to quickly comment and draw on diagrams, map routes, photos etc and share it with friends/colleagues via email, Facebook, Google+, Twitter or other social networks.


Via Nik Peachey
Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Giving voice to images. 

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 13, 4:03 AM

This looks like a handy tool for Android users.

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Is lecture really the thing that needs fixing?

Is lecture really the thing that needs fixing? | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

One of my Twitter people asked me to share my thoughts on yesterday’s Chronicle article, “Can Universities Use Data to Fix What Ails the Lecture?” At the time, I skimmed the article and replied thatLectureTools, the technological tool developed by Perry Samson to gather real-time data from students during a lecture, reminded me of the contraption you see in the photo to your left. That’s anautomated chalkboard eraser. As technology goes, it’s quite effective in what it does. Just look at how clean that board is! Which is great but… that’s a chalkboard for goodness’ sake. A piece of communications technology that is not significantly different than prehistoric cave drawing, and which has been improved upon countless times. (Purists who still cling to chalkboards: You guys are Luddites. Sorry.)  Strapping an awesome piece of technology to a chalkboard doesn’t make the chalkboard suddenly better.

Rosemary Tyrrell's insight:

Always provocative article from Robert Talbert. 

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