Teaching in Higher Education
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Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck 

Movers shakers & policy makers - Carol Dweck  | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
What would you say are a few of the biggest myths about growth mindset?

OK, myth No.1 is the myth that it’s all about effort, and that you instil it by praising effort. Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset. Adults have nagged children for centuries to try harder. That’s not a growth mindset, it’s an adult nagging a child to try harder!

Also, we find that when teachers think it’s just about effort and praising effort they may praise effort that isn’t even there, or that’s not effective. So if a child tries hard at something and you say ‘great job, you tried hard’, but they didn’t make progress, they didn’t advance, you’re actually conveying a fixed mindset because you’re saying ‘great effort, I didn’t really expect you to do that, and I don’t expect you to do that, so I’m trying to make you feel good about not doing it’. So we need people to understand that it’s appreciating a variety of process variables that lead to learning.

The second myth is that you can teach students a lesson on growth mindset and put a poster up in the front of the room, and that’s that, that they will have a growth mindset from then on. And we know if the teacher doesn’t then embody a growth mindset, if teachers don’t embody growth mindsets in their teaching practices, in the way that they give feedback when the child is stuck, and the way they present a new unit, in the way that they give opportunities for revision and growth of understanding – if they don’t embody that growth mindset, they are not teaching it. And in fact, if their behaviour contradicts the poster at the front of the room, then maybe they’re doing a disservice.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES
Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s insight:
Interview with always interesting Carol Dweck. I appreciate the nuance of what she is discussing here. 
 
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 14, 1:41 PM
Carol Dweck outlines several myths about the pychology of a growth mindset.
Ian Berry's curator insight, August 14, 7:15 PM
Great reminders of several aspects what I call appreciative leadership.  "Effort is one factor that leads to learning. So the ultimate value is growth, progress, learning. And effort is one thing that leads there but there are many other things – strategies, using resources, getting advice, guidance and mentorship, and when people leave that out and just praise effort, it’s not transmitting a growth mindset."
Chris Carter's curator insight, August 14, 7:31 PM
Carol Dweck gave words and concrete research to the belief that kids can succeed, that hard work matters, and that being "smart" has more to do with focus and determination than genes. 
Rescooped by Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D. from Digital Curation for Teachers
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Curation and Creation Over Pedagogy and Classical Education

Curation and Creation Over Pedagogy and Classical Education | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Robin Good: What is it more important?

 

To refine a science of how to transmit, explain and illustrate what "needs to be known" or that we empower learners to create their own learning direction, approach, scaffolding and pace, by providing them with the ability to "drive" and "build" their learning value and not by having them become open sponges that memorize and comprehend what we offer them?

 

From the original article by Dominik Lukes: "A self-directed, self-motivated learner, will take any resources (no matter how pedagogically naive or badly instructionally designed – Khan Academy, iTunesU lectures, iPad ebooks, labs, conventional classes or TED videos) and use them to learn.

 

As the learner becomes more aware of their own learning (gaining metacognitive skills), they will look for resources that suit their learning better. And, in many cases, will create such resources.

 

That’s why we need to encourage a culture of the remix. Or in starker terms: Curation and creation over education."

  

<- the abundance of information is changing education in so many ways... (JS)


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Pedagogy - 'Disillusioned' teachers bored by chalk and talk

Pedagogy - 'Disillusioned' teachers bored by chalk and talk | Teaching in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Traditional methods do not suit modern classrooms, expert says

 

Professor Fullan identifies them as the root of the problem. But he stresses that the new methods of teaching he describes take teachers beyond being “mere facilitators” to becoming “partners” who recognise the “importance of proactively learning alongside students”.

 

“Through such partnering, teachers not only become learners themselves, but also begin to see learning through the eyes of their students,” he writes.

 

“This ‘visibility’ is essential if teachers are to continuously challenge students to reach for the next step.”

 

The report acknowledges that many of the teaching strategies it describes have been “advocated for at least a century by the likes of Dewey, Piaget, Montessori and Vygotsky”.

 

But it says that today’s conditions means they are now being widely embraced: “

 

Through the combination of the ‘push’ of traditional schooling that fails to keep students or teachers engaged, and the ‘pull’ of new pedagogies unleashed through digital access, the transformation of education systems on a broad scale becomes not only possible, but inevitable.”


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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 26, 2014 10:25 AM

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 

Jacqui Sharp's curator insight, January 26, 2014 8:14 PM

This article supports the need to change from a traditional style of teaching to one which is in partnership with the student.

Kirsten Macaulay's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:17 AM

Very interesting article which gives educators much thoughts about the methods they chose to "deliver" their classroom content.