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Archaeologists believe Boudicca who battled Romans may be buried beneath McDonald’s restaurant in Birmingham

Archaeologists believe Boudicca who battled Romans may be buried beneath McDonald’s restaurant in Birmingham | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
Archaeologists believe Iceni monarch who battled Romans may be buried beneath McDonald’s restaurant in Birmingham
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Displaying the Famous Political Dead

Displaying the Famous Political Dead | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it

Preservation of a body is an interesting phenomenon, whether it be the evanescent embalming at a funeral home to prevent the body from decaying at the wake, or preservation for hundreds of years as is the case with Rosalia Lombardo in the Palermo catacombs. 

 

Embalming is a three-fold process of sanitation, presentation and presentation. While the process has ancient roots and is found throughout the world, the modern technique was not possible until the Civil War, when the high number of bodies needing to be shipped over distances necessitated research and led to Dr. Thomas Holmes discovering a method of arterial preservation.

 

This was later improved in 1867, the August Wilhelm von Hofmann discovered formaldehyde. Primarily it involves the replacement of fluids and blood with chemicals to prevent putrefaction.


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David Connolly's curator insight, March 29, 2013 4:51 AM
Displaying the Famous Political Dead - Katy Meyers
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Messages from Quarantine - Archaeology Magazine

Messages from Quarantine - Archaeology Magazine | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
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Turkey: Italian archaeologists find Gate to the Underworld - Culture - ANSAMed.it

Turkey: Italian archaeologists find Gate to the Underworld - Culture - ANSAMed.it | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
Turkey: Italian archaeologists find Gate to the Underworld, In the ancient city of Hieropolis, in Phrygia, According to Greco-Roman mythology and tradition, the Gate to the Underworld, also known as Pluto's Gate - Ploutonion in Greek, Plutonium in...

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David Connolly's curator insight, March 24, 2013 5:47 AM

How cool/dangerous is that!! 

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Pre-Viking tunic found on glacier as warming trend aids archaeology

Pre-Viking tunic found on glacier as warming trend aids archaeology | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it

A pre-Viking woolen tunic found beside a thawing glacier in south Norway shows how global warming is proving something of a boon for archaeology, scientists said on Thursday.

 

The greenish-brown, loose-fitting outer clothing — suitable for a person up to about 5 feet, 9 inches tall (176 centimeters) — was found 6,560 feet (2,000 meters) above sea level on what may have been a Roman-era trade route in south Norway. Carbon dating showed it was made around the year 300.

 

"It's worrying that glaciers are melting, but it's exciting for us archaeologists," Lars Piloe, a Danish archaeologist who works on Norway's glaciers, said at the first public showing of the tunic, which has been studied since it was found in 2011.


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Luxor Times: The remains of Egypt liberation battles against Hyksos were found plus remains of Santorini Volcano in North Sinai

Luxor Times: The remains of Egypt liberation battles against Hyksos were found plus remains of Santorini Volcano in North Sinai | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
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Heart disease a 4000-year-old 'serial killer' › News in Science (ABC Science)

Heart disease a 4000-year-old 'serial killer' › News in Science (ABC Science) | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
The diseased arteries of ancient mummies are challenging modern assumptions about the causes of cardiovascular disease.
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Rock Art Riches: The Devastating Cost of Australia’s Mining Boom

Rock Art Riches: The Devastating Cost of Australia’s Mining Boom | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
Rich-lister Gina Rinehart, one of the world’s biggest uranium companies, and countless other prospectors are all lining up to mine landscapes holding the planet’s most ancient artworks.
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Ancient Shoes Turn Up in Egypt Temple

Ancient Shoes Turn Up in Egypt Temple | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it

More than 2,000 years ago, at a time when Egypt was ruled by a dynasty of kings of Greek descent, someone, perhaps a group of people, hid away some of the most valuable possessions they had — their shoes.

 

Seven shoes were deposited in a jar in an Egyptian temple in Luxor, three pairs and a single one. Two pairs were originally worn by children and were only about 7 inches (18 centimeters) long.

 

Using palm fiber string, the child shoes were tied together within the single shoe (it was larger and meant for an adult) and put in the jar. Another pair of shoes, more than 9 inches (24 cm) long that had been worn by a limping adult, was also inserted in the jar.

 


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David Connolly's curator insight, February 27, 2013 11:55 PM

Fancy footwear from egypt

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1 Kitty, 2 Empires, 2,000 Years: World History Told Through a Brick

1 Kitty, 2 Empires, 2,000 Years: World History Told Through a Brick | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it

At some moment a few years after Jesus Christ died but before the second century began, someone made a brick on the island that would become the cornerstone of Great Britain.

 

The area was controlled by Rome then, and known as Britannia  and as the brick lay green, awaiting the kiln, a cat walked across the wet clay and left its footprints before wandering off to do something else. The clay was fired, the prints fixed, and the brick itself presumably became a piece of a building or road.

 

Two thousand years later, a Sonoma State master's student named Kristin Converse was poking around the holdings of the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site in Washington state. She was writing her thesis on the business and technology of brickmaking in Portlandia (known more formally as the Willamette Valley). A brick caught her eye. It was part of an odd group that was not of local origin. In one corner, there were the footprints of a cat. Where had this cat lived?

 


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David Connolly's curator insight, February 24, 2013 1:32 AM

I love these sort of stories!

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'Vampire' skeletons found in Bulgarian Black Sea town – video

The Bulgarian national history museum exhibits two 'vampire' skeletons found during excavations in the Black Sea town of Sozopol
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The Archaeology News Network: Egyptologist shares theory on Tutankhamun’s lineage

The Archaeology News Network: Egyptologist shares theory on Tutankhamun’s lineage | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
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Ancient gold wreath found in subway dig

Ancient gold wreath found in subway dig | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
A wreath of golden olive leaves seemingly worthy of Caesar himself was discovered in Greece while preparing for a new subway tunnel -- the ninth such wreath discovered in recent years.

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David Connolly's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:11 AM

Amazing.   try excavting that!!

Jo Williamson's comment, February 12, 2013 1:36 AM
Wow!!! and I get all excited over flint flakes................
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Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum: Ordinary people in extraordinary times

Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum: Ordinary people in extraordinary times | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
What was life like in Roman Empire? The new exhibition at the British Museum will give visitors a unique opportunity to find out. Curator Paul Roberts explains his ambitious project to recreate a t...
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2,400-Year-Old Myths of Mummy-Making Busted

2,400-Year-Old Myths of Mummy-Making Busted | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
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Sweden’s Stone Ships - Archaeology Magazine

Sweden’s Stone Ships - Archaeology Magazine | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
Louise Zarmati's insight:

A great example of reinterpretation of archaeological remains.

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Setting the Genetic Clock - Archaeology Magazine

Setting the Genetic Clock - Archaeology Magazine | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
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Women in Old World Archaeology

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An excellent resource on outstanding women in OW archaeology.

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The Archaeology News Network: New look at heretic pharaoh Akhenaton's reign

The Archaeology News Network: New look at heretic pharaoh Akhenaton's reign | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
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Downstairs at Downton: Tutankhamun exhibition goes on show at Highclere Castle

Downstairs at Downton: Tutankhamun exhibition goes on show at Highclere Castle | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
Highclere Castle is best known as the setting for Downton Abbey. But a new exhibition is set to shine a light on the building's past - and the secrets of Tutankhamun's tomb.
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Could the ancient Romans have built a digital computer? |

Could the ancient Romans have built a digital computer? | | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it

The Romans were undoubtedly master engineers. They were experts at civil engineering, building roads, improving sanitation, inventing Roman concrete, and constructing aqueducts that adhere to tolerances impressive even by today’s standards. Perhaps the best evidence of their aptitude is the fact that many of those structures still stand today, almost 2000 years later. They even began dabbling in technology vastly ahead of their time. Hero of Alexandria drew up plans for a rudimentary steam engine in his Spiritalia seu Pneumatica. He called it the aeolipile.


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David Connolly's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:07 AM



A very thought provoking article. 

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On this day: Mungo Man fossil found

On this day: Mungo Man fossil found | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it

ON FEBRUARY 26, 1974, a young geologist managed to stretch Australian history by 20,000-odd years when he found 40,000-year-old human remains buried in a dry lake bed in south-western New South Wales.

The discovery, made in the midst of the Aboriginal rights movement – which would quickly intergrate the findings into its slogans – would later double the time that Australia's first humans were thought to have arrived on the continent.

Jim Bowler, now in his 80s, and an Honorary Professor at the University of Melbourne, was with the Australian National University when he came across the remains at Lake Mungo, about 700 km west of Sydney.


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New study sheds light on the disappearance of a pre-historic culture - UQ News Online - The University of Queensland

New study sheds light on the disappearance of a pre-historic culture - UQ News Online - The University of Queensland | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
A new study has shed light on the disappearance of a pre-historic culture, predating present day aboriginal inhabitants.
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The Archaeology News Network: Hatshepsut's chapel at Karnak to open for public

The Archaeology News Network: Hatshepsut's chapel at Karnak to open for public | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
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The Archaeology News Network: Treasures of Macedonia at Pella Museum

The Archaeology News Network: Treasures of Macedonia at Pella Museum | Teaching history and archaeology to kids | Scoop.it
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