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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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APHG-U6

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Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, June 26, 5:25 PM

Just a few years ago there were only  20 cities with a pop over 10 million.  I'll use this with my  10 geography class to compare Australia's population and size with these cities and  look at debates around policies.  I,ll try and get the students to debate around ecological sustainability.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

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Old World Language Families Map - Maps on the Web

Old World Language Families Map - Maps on the Web | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Old World Language Families Map

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APHG-Unit 3 Rubenstein Ch 5

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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APHG-U2

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Astienback J. Seb's curator insight, September 17, 5:47 AM

YOUNG AND POOR...

Silvina Paricio Tato's curator insight, September 17, 12:42 PM

Via Javier Marrero Acosta

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:17 PM

Unit 2

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Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse

Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Argentina should be careful in considering the implications of the idea of moving the capital [from Buenos Aires] to Santiago del Estero. While a dramatic move might be appealing as a fresh start, it could end up aggravating the challenges of governing the country. Capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."


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APHG-U4

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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 23, 11:15 AM

While several of Argentina's leaders believe moving the capital to the interior of the country, this article discusses how such a move could bring about more problems than solutions. While a capital in the interior could offer a nice buffer from the pressures of a major population center, the isolation could actually have a negative effect and lessen the government's effectiveness. It was interesting to read the examples of other isolated capitals that have poorer governance.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, October 27, 8:22 PM

I imagine moving a capital is not an easy thing and can bring problems to the country but I also think it would have positive effects. If for example the capital of Argentina move to another city then that city will grow and so will the country's progress. So moving a capital can be good but also bad.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 28, 11:41 PM

Argentina moving the capital from Buenos Aires to Santiago del Estero may seem like a good idea, given that some would say that the capital would be better off in an area that is not so populated such as Buenos Aires. Others say that moving the capital is not good because it could result in an ineffective government and more corrupt, so on paper more the capital to an area that looks like it would be geographically advantageous, would in fact have a detrimental effect on the country.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


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APHG-all

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 22, 9:28 AM

More climate considerations

Olga Boldina's curator insight, September 24, 10:39 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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APHG-U3

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Eli Levine's curator insight, September 21, 12:45 PM

Other peoples, with different histories, cultures, etc, are not going to be like us.

 

Ever.

 

Period.

 

Might as well learn to accept that (and learn it in general) so that we do not invoke negative sentiments to develop.

 

 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 22, 11:57 AM

Religion and its influence

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:19 PM

Unit 3

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You Can't Understand ISIS If You Don't Know the History of Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia

You Can't Understand ISIS If You Don't Know the History of Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Abd al-Wahhab argued that all Muslims must individually pledge their allegiance to a single Muslim leader (a Caliph, if there were one). Those who would not conform to this view should be killed, their wives and daughters violated, and their possessi...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 4:15 PM

This is a very interesting article that links the issues that ISIS pose with Saudi Arabia's current ambivalence about whether to back ISIS are repudiate them.  Much of Saudi Arabia is split on the topic.   

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 4, 4:32 PM

units 3 & 4

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The Newest Countries in the world

The Newest Countries in the world | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Will Scotland follow the same fate as any of the other young nations in the world? Perhaps, but probably not. A glance down the list of the nine newest sovereign states below reveals that each situation is unique: It's hard to fully equate Scotland's situation with that of Slovakia, let alone with East Timor.

Even so, a glance back at history does show that the world's borders are changing more than we might appreciate: And the changes can sometimes take some time to settle."


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APHG U4

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 8:58 AM

The recent histories of new countries getting started is important to reflect on as the world might get a new addition to this list. 

  1. South Sudan (July 2011)
  2. Kosovo (Feb 2008)
  3. Montenegro (June 2006)
  4. Serbia (June 2006)
  5. East Timor (May 2002)
  6. Palau (Oct 1994)
  7. Eritrea (Apr 1993)
  8. Czech Republic (Jan 1993)
  9. Slovakia (Jan 1993)
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 17, 12:47 PM

unit 4

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 29, 4:57 AM
The Newest Countries in the world
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Roma advocate scoops Wallenberg prize - The Local

Roma advocate scoops Wallenberg prize - The Local | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
A Roma man has been hailed as inspirational after scooping this year's Raoul Wallenberg Prize for setting up an organization to help stamp out racism against (Roma advocate scoops Wallenberg prize http://t.co/7SIXf5oiDv)...

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APHG-U3

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Syrian Refugees Surpass 3 Million, U.N. Says

Syrian Refugees Surpass 3 Million, U.N. Says | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
The relief agency called the crisis “the biggest humanitarian emergency of our era,” as more than a million people have fled in the last 12 months alone.

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APHG-U4

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Comparing the five major world religions | Geog...

Comparing the five major world religions | Geog... | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths.

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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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APHG U4

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FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, September 4, 3:58 PM

We discussed Landsat images today and borders. Here is a current article to bring it all together.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, September 18, 5:26 AM

what a difference a govt makes!

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


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APHG-Unit 4

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."


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APHG-Unit 2 & Unit 6

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 3:21 PM

Poverty is nothing new but in the last hundred years the gulf between those that have money and those that don't has become almost insurmountable.  The lack of support systems that many in the West take for granted is absent in many developing countries.  

 

Access to education and health care are vital if these situations are to ever improve. 

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 8:33 AM

Extreme poverty is defined by the World Bank living on under $1.25 per day.  The geography of of extreme poverty highly uneven--two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo)   - Seth Dixon

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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For Yazidis, Exile From Spiritual Homeland in Iraq Dilutes Ancient Culture

For Yazidis, Exile From Spiritual Homeland in Iraq Dilutes Ancient Culture | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Some are contemplating migration, severing ties to their holy land. Others want to stay and protect their shrines.

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APHG-U3

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 11, 1:17 PM

When we discuss the geography of religion, frequently we are discussing the distribution of particular religions.  However, some religions are deeply embedded in particular places and their spiritual rites, customs and traditions are intrinsically linked with sacred spaces and particular geographies.  The Yazidi are are religious group that is deeply connected to the mountains of northern Iraq--areas that are now being evacuated because of ISIS.  Some are contemplating migrating to safety, but severing their ties to their holy land. Others want to stay and protect their sacred spaces.


Tagsplace, culture religion, Middle East.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 29, 12:49 PM

With ISIS on the rise in Iraq they are forcibly pushing people of the Yazidi faith out of their homeland which also serves as their holy land.  This place is very sacred to them, described as being as important to them as Mecca is to Muslims.  This is giving people an extremely hard choice to make.  Do they evacuate and go into the mountains leaving their sacred homeland because of the threat of ISIS against their people, or do they stay put where their roots are and risk being killed by ISIS.  A majority of the people that live here say that they would not want to leave their land and would rather live here no matter the circumstances than live anywhere else, showing you just how dedicated these people are to the place that they live.

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Staking a claim to create a country

Staking a claim to create a country | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Jeremiah Heaton wants a no-man’s-land in east Africa, but international officials say his claim is insufficient.

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APHG-U4

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, September 18, 5:15 AM

Interesting idea- how to create your own country.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 26, 10:35 AM

In order to have a country, other powerful nations must recognize the land as a sovereign state. Jeremiah Heaton has a long shot at claiming the land as his own. Though the land is not officially recognize as part of either Sudan or Egypt, it up for grabs for those bordering countries. It'll also be hard to start an economy in the land as dry as the land Jeremiah's claiming. In order to be recognized as a nation, an economy as to be recognized as well. Though Jeremiah hopes in claiming this land, he has a lot to work for before making this dream a reality.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 1:14 PM

There was once an episode of Family Guy where Peter Griffin establishes his own country when his house is left of a map of Quahog. This story reminds me of that episode, but also raises some questions as to what it takes to be a sovereign nation. Jeremiah Heaton has long term goals of creating an agricultural production center, has been living in area and is willing to put in the work to establish a political identity. Also an extreme example it does show how some nations come to be globally recognized and also how many forces are against new nations being established and recognized.

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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APHG-U2

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 20, 2:52 AM

Option topic: urban environmental change and management

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 22, 12:47 PM

This reality is detrimental to the future of our society because it focuses on the now rather than looking into long terms on how these changes will impact our world in the long run. Looking at the way our society is progressing, these changes are relevant in major metropolitan cities, where the job market is attractive to the young rather than those with over 30 years of experience. In our society, not many see retirement being in the center of the city. Creating a society that accommodates both the young and the old, along with the married and unmarried is pivotal to the progression of  our ever changing world. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

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APHG-U6

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Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:14 PM

Unit 6

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Will Everyone Shut Up Already About How the Nordic Countries Top Every Global Ranking?

Will Everyone Shut Up Already About How the Nordic Countries Top Every Global Ranking? | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
The Nordic countries are paradigms of equality, good education, female empowerment, and progressiveness. We know this because we are told. And told and told and told.   To take one example, the latest Global Gender Gap rankings from the World Economic Forum were topped by Iceland (for the fifth year...

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APHG-U 2 & U6 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 1, 9:12 AM

This is an interesting op-ed, highlighting that the Nordic rankings are achieved in ways that are unthinkable in the United States political paradigm. 

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What can Scotland learn from Quebec?

What can Scotland learn from Quebec? | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"What would happen to Trident on the Clyde, what kind of Army would an independent Scotland have and how much would it cost?

These are just some of the questions being asked as part of the referendum debate on defence."


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APHG -U4

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 8, 10:27 PM

This simple animation shows how the Scottish independence question is much more complicated because of the UK's involvement with the EU and Scotland's presumed future with that supranational organization. 

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Why all men should be able to read a map

Why all men should be able to read a map | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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APHG-U1

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Truthbehere2's curator insight, September 3, 1:21 PM

My dad could read maps but he refused to pull the paper out due to pride..obviously some humans aren't born with a compass, so its a life saver to ask for directions and read a map.

Mr. Gresham's curator insight, September 3, 3:34 PM

As we begin to really did into the meat of Geography, this article does a great job of explaining the importance of map knowledge!

Emily Bian's curator insight, September 28, 9:31 PM

I agree that people should be able to read physical maps, instead of always relying on their gps or smartphone. Although it is more convenient, I think everybody should still be able to read a paper map, in case something goes wrong. Did you know that 1 in 3 people nowadays can't read a map? I believe it is a skill that takes time and practice, so start practicing now! It took me a while to be able to use the map, because it seemed so much more confusing than my phone or a GPS, but eventually I got it, and it gets easier each time. 

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Topography of Religion | Geography Education

Topography of Religion | Geography Education | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.' Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions...

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APHG-U3

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A map of the Germanic, Romance, and Slavic... - Maps on the Web

A map of the Germanic, Romance, and Slavic... - Maps on the Web | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
A map of the Germanic, Romance, and Slavic language groups (A map of the Germanic, Romance, and Slavic language groups #languages #europe http://t.co/17XzVqXQKn)...

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APHG-U3

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New Zealand's Wild Haka

ESPN Video: In the USA-New Zealand FIBA matchup, the USA players are very confused by New Zealand's pregame Haka.

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APHG-U3

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 9:03 AM

I've enjoyed the Haka, a ritualized war dance that the New Zealand teams often perform just before a match (and can't we argue that sports a form of ritualized warfare?).  The clash of cultural contexts is  of New Zealand and Team USA is what makes this video work for me. 

Sarah Mahoney's curator insight, October 9, 8:14 PM

Great example of cultural diversity

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The 9 biggest myths about ISIS

The 9 biggest myths about ISIS | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
If you want to understand the Islamic State, better known as ISIS, the first thing you have to know about them is that they are not crazy. Murderous adherents to a violent medieval ideology, sure. But not insane.

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APHG-Unit 4

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 6, 3:15 PM

(in-class 2 - ISIS)

This is a great education tool in the sense that data is provided in a relatively OBJECTIVE manner / just the facts. The reader is allowed to make their own opinions and conclusions.
Of that which is notable is that ISIS is not a group of disorganized rebels; rather, it is a highly organized, thought-through, structured military force. It bears some shocking resemblance to national armies, including that of the U.S., in this manner.
Also, supporters of ISIS aren't necessarily extremists. Some support it in hopes of having a new political power which would be beneficial to them. Though religion is obviously involved, politics has been a major contributor to their success.
Lastly, I was surprised that up until very recently (right before the current crisis), ISIS was a subdivision of Al-Qaeda. Even more shocking is the reason why they aren't any longer: Head Al-Qaeda officials said ISIS was being 'too violent' towards civilians. (How ironic!) A group even more extreme than Al-Qaeda is definitely something worth having knowledge about, because (although it is clichéd), knowledge of the enemy is power over them.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 6, 3:28 PM

I was interested to read the 9 myths that are associated with ISIS. Some of the myths stated were very surprising.There is so much information being passed around about this terror organization that it is hard to differentiate the truth with myth.Some of the myths that surprised me were:

Myth #3: ISIS is part of al-Qaeda.

The fact that this group was split  off from al-Qaeda for being to violent was not something that is openly talked about.

Myth #6: ISIS is afraid of female soldiers.

Isis soldiers are not afraid of fighting female soldiers however they do believe if they are killed by a woman then they will not go to paradise.

 

It is important to know all the information about this topic and to be well informed on the issues.

 

 

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 6, 3:45 PM

This website helps to dispel many of the myths and misunderstandings about ISIS. The group is a surprisingly complex amalgamation of many different, smaller groups and nationalities that has sprung out of the recent events in the region. While the group is a result of modern developments in the area, it is still firmly based on an older history, like the ancient Sunni/Shia divide and the old Islamic Caliphate. The group is brutal in its methods because it is still competing with other terrorist/insurgent groups in the area, and brutality is one of the few messages they all understand. Intervention by more powerful Western militaries can certainly help in the fight against ISIS, but it is not the final answer. For most Americans it is easy to see ISIS as the new al-Qaida, but the reality is a very complex situation with no easy answers, and it has a long way to go until it’s resolved.

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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APHG-Unit 3

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, August 31, 10:45 AM

8th grade World History Teachers in AL - What do you think?

Mary Elizabeth's curator insight, August 31, 4:41 PM

perfect for Culture Unit

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.