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Poop Stories

Poop Stories | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"From the time we’re about 6 years old, everyone loves a good poop joke, right? But is there something more meaningful lurking beneath the bathroom banter? Take a look at some international potty humor and then follow the jokes to a deeper understanding. Every laugh on this page reflects a life and death issue: the very real sanitation problems facing India today."


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APHG-U2 & U6

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Roman M's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:21 AM

I do not want to use public bathrooms in the first place but this makes me want to not use them more. It is frightening that three children die every minute because of poor sanitation. Also, 1.5 million children die every year because of poor sanitation. These facts are so horrific and now I am going to make sure I am sanitized.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:19 PM

It is fascinating that a country so many lives are lost due to something we find simple and trivial, and really do not even think about but use on a daily basis.

Jessica Robson Postlethwaite's curator insight, November 18, 2014 7:03 PM

World toilet day!

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Austin, then and now

Austin, then and now | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Drag or swipe the slider to see how Austin's downtown skyline has changed over time."

 

Tags: urban, planning, urbanism.


Via Seth Dixon
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Services & Urbanization-CBD

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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 10:29 PM

This can show how quickly areas can develop if giving the right economic opportunities and a strong government.  

Cade Bruce's curator insight, May 26, 11:10 PM

This shows how fast cities can grow and how urban land is used so efficiently, with the taller and taller buildings.

 

This is the concept Development and character of cities because it shows the development of austin to taller buildings, and more dense, compact landscape.

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 12:21 AM

A wave of New Urbanism has spread through Austin, with downtown growth, especially in high-rises on the rapid increase over the past decade as demand for high-price residences downtown rises with the influx of young and educated people into the city.

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Map of Most Common Race

Map of Most Common Race | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"The map above shows the most prevalent race in each county, based on data from the 2013 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. Select and deselect to make various comparisons."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, census, ethnicity, race.


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Culture-race

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 6:47 PM

Summary: This map shows racial distribution throughout Baltimore.

 

Insight: This article is relevant to unit 7 because it shows how a city has been planned and built over time around racial discrimination with areas of similar race clumped together.

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 12:17 AM

This census map shows the diversity of America, but also largely shows how entire counties, such as those around Baltimore and St. Louis can be seemingly segregated between races, though all persons are American. This leads to bizarre nationalism and continued ethnic and racial divides in society through the uneven distribution of race and ethnicity in the US.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 9:00 AM

I think it is interesting to think about the reasons where certain ethnic groups live. It is sad but also interesting to see that because of the slavery in the south, black americans make a large if not  dominant percentage of the majority  of the south. It is also interesting to see where Asian Americans living where they do because it is a newer migration pattern. This is reflected in the areas that Asians settle because of how they got to their homes.

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Catacombs make a comeback as Jerusalem seeks room for the dead

Catacombs make a comeback as Jerusalem seeks room for the dead | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
In a city rapidly running out of cemetery space, Jews are looking to a 2,000-year-old solution.

 

For Jews seeking eternal rest, the most coveted real estate on Earth lies in the soil of Jerusalem. Unfortunately, the city is rapidly running out of room to bury the dead. And so it has come to pass that an Israeli burial organization has teamed with a cutting-edge construction firm to bore deep under a mountain here to create a vast underground necropolis — with ­elevators. The first phase of the new subterranean city of the dead will include 22,000 crypts, arranged floor to ceiling in three tiers, in a network of intersecting tunnels now being dug through the rocky clay soil beneath Jerusalem’s largest cemetery.


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Religion- bury dead

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 9:40 AM

unit 3

Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 6:36 PM

Summary: As Jerusalem runs out of space along the outskirts of the city, they must find more places to bury there dead as it is a religious tradition for Christians and Jews to be buried, so urban planning must be adjusted for catacombs in order to bury the dead.

 

Insight: This article is relevant to units 3 and 7 because it shows how religious traits can effect a city plan or model.

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Map Projections

This video describes what map projections are, and how the Earth can be represented using map projections within a GIS.

 

Tags: Mapping, video, map projections, cartography.


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Ch 1 Map Projections

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Rich Schultz's curator insight, May 21, 5:35 PM

Yep - its from ESRI

Zulqarnainkhan's comment, May 22, 6:32 AM
http://www.eurogamez.net/2015/05/download-life-is-strange-episode-3-pc.html
Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, May 25, 3:14 PM

This video relates to Use of geospatial technologies, such as GIS, remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), and online maps. It tells about how the world is a 3D shape, but we view it as 2D, which leads to distortions in world size. The use of GIS allows for the world to be projected onto any shape such as a cone, rectangle, prism, or pyramid. And this leads to the different map projections. 

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These maps depict the world's news in real time

These maps depict the world's news in real time | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
An experimental tool to understand the world.

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Intro

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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 27, 1:18 AM

GDELT (Global Database of Events, Languages, and Tone) has created a database that combines and filters news events from all over the world and maps them out on a world map for people to view according to the location of the event and changes the color according to the relative mood of the event.The map is constantly updating with relevant information and ignores data that will not be helpful in gaining an accurate perspective on global news.

 

This article is related to the political organization of space through the world news that affects people internationally and the scale of unique perspectives that use this data according to their geographic location. Different pieces of information relate better to certain areas depending on how close the area is to the source of the news.

Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 8:49 AM

I think this is an interesting representation to show how the ability to have access to news and internet is the new most important thing to have to get word out. Now if you can speak English and have a computer with internet access you can.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 9:14 AM

This map allows people to understand the flow of news from around the world. We can use it to see where and what is happening and chart it to connect trends for example Syria and France are large because of the recent happenings with terrorists and terror attacks.

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How Suburban Are Big American Cities?

How Suburban Are Big American Cities? | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"What, exactly, is a city? Technically, cities are legal designations that, under state laws, have specific public powers and functions. But many of the largest American cities — especially in the South and West — don’t feel like cities, at least not in the high-rise-and-subways, 'Sesame Street' sense. Large swaths of many big cities are residential neighborhoods of single-family homes, as car-dependent as any suburb.

Cities like Austin and Fort Worth in Texas and Charlotte, North Carolina, are big and growing quickly, but largely suburban. According to Census Bureau data released Thursday, the population of the country’s biggest cities (the 34 with at least 500,000 residents) grew 0.99 percent in 2014 — versus 0.88 percent for all metropolitan areas and 0.75 percent for the U.S. overall. But city growth isn’t the same as urban growth. Three cities of the largest 10 are more suburban than urban, based on our analysis of how people describe the neighborhoods where they live."

 

Tags: urban, suburbs, housing, sprawl, planning, density.


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Urbanization

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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 26, 11:56 PM

Suburbanization in the United States has been a phenomenon for the past 60 or so years, and continues on to this day with massive highway transport systems centered around cars. Its no surprise with cheap suburban land and relatively easy commutes that many of the fastest growing cities in the US are seeing their growth largely in suburban areas, where many more people can afford to live than the big city.

Sammie Bryant's curator insight, May 27, 12:07 AM

This article accurately depicts the difference between a normal city 50 years ago and a city today, as well as the continuing spread of suburbanization. For example, Austin, the capital of texas, a hustling, bustling always busy area, is predominantly suburban. As cities and countries continue to advance and develop and its citizens become more successful and family oriented, suburban homes for families will become more needed than something smaller, like condos or studio apartments. As the needs of the cities change, the structure of the city changes as well. This applies to our final unit of APHUG: Cities and Urban Land Use.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 10:43 AM

unit 7

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On the trail of Myanmar's Rohingya migrants

On the trail of Myanmar's Rohingya migrants | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Jonah Fisher has been to Rakhine state in Myanmar to meet Rohingya migrants who are being forced to return home - but at a cost.

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Migration

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 24, 10:08 PM

The Rohingya that are in the news lately are refugees on boats that everyone agrees that SOMEONE should help, but that no country in Southeast Asia wants to bring in. 


Tags: migration, political, refugeesBurma, Southeast Asia.

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3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus

3 easy ways to tell if a viral photo is bogus | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Many people posting it wrote that the photo was taken during the recent Nepal earthquakes, and that it depicts 'a brother protecting his sister.' Pretty heartwarming, right? It’s the exact sort of thing your aunt would share on Facebook. A perfectly clear, resonant message about survival and empathy and inequality, all that good stuff.  There’s only one problem: That picture is fake."


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Study Skills

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Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 26, 7:43 PM

Nice tip.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 10:43 AM

course resource, life resource :)

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 1:05 PM

This picture supposedly taken in Nepal of a brother protecting his younger sister due to recent earthquakes is, in fact, false. These kinds of photos portraying helpless people in foreign countries are often created to increase Instagram likes and retweets on twitter. Some times are real photos of someone or something going through tragedy, but often they are not.    

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The case for engineering our food

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
MsPerry's insight:

Ag Unit

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 12:57 PM

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

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For Yazidis, Exile From Spiritual Homeland in Iraq Dilutes Ancient Culture

For Yazidis, Exile From Spiritual Homeland in Iraq Dilutes Ancient Culture | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Some are contemplating migration, severing ties to their holy land. Others want to stay and protect their shrines.

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APHG-U3

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:49 PM

With ISIS on the rise in Iraq they are forcibly pushing people of the Yazidi faith out of their homeland which also serves as their holy land.  This place is very sacred to them, described as being as important to them as Mecca is to Muslims.  This is giving people an extremely hard choice to make.  Do they evacuate and go into the mountains leaving their sacred homeland because of the threat of ISIS against their people, or do they stay put where their roots are and risk being killed by ISIS.  A majority of the people that live here say that they would not want to leave their land and would rather live here no matter the circumstances than live anywhere else, showing you just how dedicated these people are to the place that they live.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 12:07 PM

"I cannot leave Lalish, or live without it," Pir Said said. "People, whoever they might be, are most present in their own land. When they leave it, they disappear—they melt into other communities. We're present here as a community in Lalish. If we leave, we think we will be weakened."


Many religions are incredibly tied to place. The Yazidis in Irag are a religious minority that blends ancient Mesopotamian beliefs and Zoroastrianism with Christian, Jewish, and Sufi influences. They are incredibly tied to the land, and fear that being chased out will ultimately end in the weakening of their religious community. Yazidis are no strangers to this, and in the recent past they have lost entire villages to Hussein's Arabization project. For the Yazidis, their religion is much more a way of life than just a spiritual belief. Like many different peoples, they fear that being forced to move will cause their religious community to be taken over by the beliefs and lifestyles of where they have to live.  

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 3:59 PM

The Yazidis are loosing their spiritual identity due to their exile from Iraq. They are being forced out of the country and it is slowly diluting the diversity in their religion as they are becoming more spread out and great cultural artifacts are lost. 

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Staking a claim to create a country

Staking a claim to create a country | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Jeremiah Heaton wants a no-man’s-land in east Africa, but international officials say his claim is insufficient.

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APHG-U4

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 1:14 PM

There was once an episode of Family Guy where Peter Griffin establishes his own country when his house is left of a map of Quahog. This story reminds me of that episode, but also raises some questions as to what it takes to be a sovereign nation. Jeremiah Heaton has long term goals of creating an agricultural production center, has been living in area and is willing to put in the work to establish a political identity. Also an extreme example it does show how some nations come to be globally recognized and also how many forces are against new nations being established and recognized.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:33 PM

This man decided to give his daughter a piece of unclaimed territory in Africa for her seventh birthday so that she could be a princess.  Now he wants his country to be recognized by surrounding countries as well as the UN.  Everyone is saying that this is not allowed for various reasons.  He does not have people living there, he is not himself inhabiting the area, other countries are not recognizing his claim, and one cannot simply put a flag in the ground and say that it is theirs.  If this were the case there would be seven billion flags around the world.  He is claiming that he has hopes for this area, turning it into an agricultural center where he can help with food supply issues in the surrounding area.  I see that he has hopes and dreams for the area, but as far as calling it his own country I don't see that going as well as he thinks.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 10:32 AM

Having read through most of the article, I find it funny how he actually believes that he can just step foot on soil and claim it as his own country. The description, “members of the occupying nation must have lived on the land for several years,” and, “it must also demonstrate that it has occupied the space, not that it just physically stepped foot there,” are the best ways to describe why it would never work for him. You have to make use of the space that is provided. Even though he claims that he will, turn the country into an agricultural production center that will tackle food security issues in the region, it hasn’t been done yet, and even if it was he wouldn’t occupy nearly enough of the space. Egypt and Sudan are officially negotiating over the land.

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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APHG-U2

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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

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APHG-U6

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Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:14 PM

Unit 6

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Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion

Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
There are more religiously unaffiliated Americans than Catholic Americans or mainline Protestant Americans.

 

Christianity is on the decline in America, not just among younger generations or in certain regions of the country but across race, gender, education and geographic barriers. The percentage of adults who describe themselves as Christians dropped by nearly eight percentage points in just seven years to about 71 percent, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center.

 

Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, USA.


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Religion-Christianity in USA

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Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 8:58 PM

this amazed me but it makes sense because all the youth is playing video games nowadays.

Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 12:23 AM

As scientific knowledge and material goods continue to rise in abundance for many Americans, the need for religion and otherworldly salvation is declining, which can be found in recent census surveys of religion and affiliation, which sees many Americans becoming unaffiliated with religion in favor of a more secular lifestyle.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 4:23 AM

It is a shame that millennials are declining religion more. Religion is one of the bases of culture. If you take away a base from a house it crumbles. The more we deny our religion, values, and culture in general the more we will become plain, and no longer culturally diverse.

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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.

 

At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.


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Urbanization - transportation

 

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Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 11:07 PM

Urban Unit

Summary

This article really went in depth to show how "freeways transformed American cities." When freeways were being built and added in the 1950s through 1980s heavily, they often were added to existing places. These places already had housing and cities built that needed to accommodate for the new freeways. The destruction o houses in this urban sprawl was thought to be more beneficial in the end, but the people then moved to new areas which became overpopulated. 

Insight

The building of freeways was not planned in the original building of cities at first. This made the freeways have to be planned around the existing cities to make them the most beneficial. This shows how the urban land use is complex, in adding new urban features into old existing places in order to modernize and urbanize a place.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 4:00 AM

It is really interesting to see how urbanization has affected not just us today but our parents and grandparents. Of course with innovation includes consequence whether good or bad it happens. Go America!

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:16 AM

Industrialization changed not only the physical face of cities, but also the social. Innovations such as highways have caused transportation to become widely easier, allowing people from all different regions of the city to travel easily back and forth from place to place. 

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Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos

Historian Says Don't 'Sanitize' How Our Government Created Ghettos | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"We have a myth today that the ghettos in metropolitan areas around the country are what the Supreme Court calls 'de-facto' — just the accident of the fact that people have not enough income to move into middle class neighborhoods or because real estate agents steered black and white families to different neighborhoods or because there was white flight.  It was not the unintended effect of benign policies, it was an explicit, racially purposeful policy that was pursued at all levels of government, and that's the reason we have these ghettos today and we are reaping the fruits of those policies."

 

Tags: economic, race, racism, historical, neighborhood, podcast, urban, place, poverty, socioeconomic.


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Urbanization- ghettos

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Utahns, Mainers and Wyomingites: The ultimate guide to what to call people from each state

Utahns, Mainers and Wyomingites: The ultimate guide to what to call people from each state | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"For most states, you’re safe adding an –n, and maybe a few other letters, to the state’s name – a la Coloradans, Nebraskans and Californians. For three states, Wyoming, Wisconsin and New Hampshire, the correct method is to add an –ite. For a handful of states in the northeast, the style is to add an 'r' – New Yorker, Vermonter, Mainer, Marylander, Connecticuter and Rhode Islander."


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Intro-Ch 1 Toponyms

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Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 1:25 PM

In trying to avoid embarrassment, this article gives a simple guide and a clear visual to help you know how to properly refer to those from certain states and avoid incurring any wrath from grammar sticklers or easily offended citizens. For the majority of states, simply adding an "n" and maybe changing a letter for sound purposes does the trick. But for several states the correct ending is "-ite". Then there are the states for which you add "-er".

 

This is article is related to cultural patterns and processes through the  difference of cultures based on geographic location. The linguistic norm is completely unique and respected in its location of use.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 10:21 PM

This is a really interesting view on a map projection and shows how many possibilities there are for differences.  

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 9:17 AM

This map has data allocating what people are called based on their region. What concerns me is that there is no information depicting what one would be called depending on which city you are from. For example I am from Austin, Texas so you would call me an Austinite but since I am from Texas you would call me a Texan.

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Customizable Maps of Mexico

Customizable Maps of Mexico | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Find worksheets about Geography of Mexico.  Hundreds of worksheets--millions of combinations."


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Maps

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 9:58 PM

One of the problems with so many outline maps for classroom use is that, depending on your lesson plan, you might want it labeled, showing surrounding countries or in color...but maybe not.  This site let's you customize these simple maps that are perfect for the K-12 classroom (and yes, they have maps for all regions of the world).  


Tags: Mexico, K12, map, map archives

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 27, 10:06 AM

this is just a quick highlight of the geography of mexico in all its aspects 

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You did such a wonderful thing: Huge surprise for hero Sikh man

Harman Singh defied the rules of his religion to help an injured young boy.

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Religion

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The Precision Agriculture Revolution

The Precision Agriculture Revolution | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Thousands of years ago, agriculture began as a highly site-specific activity. The first farmers were gardeners who nurtured individual plants, and they sought out the microclimates and patches of soil that favored those plants. But as farmers acquired scientific knowledge and mechanical expertise, they enlarged their plots, using standardized approaches—plowing the soil, spreading animal manure as fertilizer, rotating the crops from year to year—to boost crop yields. Over the years, they developed better methods of preparing the soil and protecting plants from insects and, eventually, machines to reduce the labor required. Starting in the nineteenth century, scientists invented chemical pesticides and used newly discovered genetic principles to select for more productive plants. Even though these methods maximized overall productivity, they led some areas within fields to underperform. Nonetheless, yields rose to once-unimaginable levels: for some crops, they increased tenfold from the nineteenth century to the present.  

Today, however, the trend toward ever more uniform practices is starting to reverse, thanks to what is known as 'precision agriculture.' Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and use that knowledge to customize how they cultivate each square foot."

 

Tags: technology, food production, agriculture, agribusiness, spatial, GPS.


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Ag Unit

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Brandon Chesney's curator insight, May 27, 9:15 AM

The first farmers were people who nurtured individual plants but over the years knowledge allowed for more plants to be grown each year. Now a thing called precision agriculture allows for a farmer to see the production of all of his plants where as in the old days you used your naked eye and not all this technology. 

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 11:52 AM

Development and diffusion of agriculture-

This article explains how agriculture has developed and grown for thousands of years, and today with our technology, we can do what seemed impossible to the past peoples.

This article represents Development and Diffusion of Agriculture by showing how in our past years, we could mostly only do substinence agriculture, but today with technology, we can do so much more, with so much less people.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 11:59 AM

Land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts-

This article explains how today we have the best technology we have ever created agriculture-wise, but with this, more land has been used. But thanks to precision agriculture, we can use data to determine where we can use the least amount of raw materials needed, thus helping protect more land than before.

 This article demonstrates land use/land cover change: irrigation, desertification, deforestation, wetland destruction, conservation efforts to protect or restore natural land cover, and global impacts by showing how with the technology today and precision farming, we can use less raw materials than ever before, thus helping lessen global impact.

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HDI over time in Central America

HDI over time in Central America | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Explore public data through Google's visualization tools." 


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Population Unit

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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 12:01 AM

With the spread of the Green Revolution and modern technology throughout the developing world, many nations that were falling in HDI level in the 1980s, especially those in Africa, were able to recover and begin moving on the path to a higher development index. There is also a positive correlation between HDI and income index, showing that a higher HDI leads to a higher income, and vice-versa.

Savannah Rains's curator insight, May 27, 1:41 AM

This HDI model is showing rankings of Central America. The HDI combines stats like life expectancy, education, and per capita income and compares countries to one another. This is an interesting graph to observe ans study because people should be able to have the knowledge of their country compared to others and where places lie in comparison to their neighboring countries. 

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 1:05 PM

Human Development Index-

This article explains how more and more countries in Central America are becoming more developed and have higher HDI. This helps create better views on Central America, thus giving it better chances via trade with other countries.

 

This article demonstrates the idea of HDI by showing the actual HDI's in Central America, and how most countries are increasing overall.

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Old World Language Families Map - Maps on the Web

Old World Language Families Map - Maps on the Web | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it
Old World Language Families Map

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APHG-Unit 3 Rubenstein Ch 5

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


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APHG-U2

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Max Minard's curator insight, March 22, 9:04 PM

This map shows the average age for every country based on its own individual population. It even provides the oldest and youngest countries with Niger being the youngest country on average and Germany and Japan tied for the oldest country on average. certain patterns can be seen on the map such as the green areas (teens as median age) being mainly centered is almost all of Africa. The other areas are in the twenties. Based on this information, one can safely assume that the average global ages correlates with the relative development of each country and it s success in domestic health care. Having this allows for their population to have a larger life expectancy and therefore a higher average age based on its overall population. 

Kristen Trammell's curator insight, March 23, 12:05 PM

I. Using the data from CIA Facebook, global post created a map illustrating the median ages of countries around the world. The world’s fifteen youngest countries are all located in Africa. The high number of teenagers in developed countries leads to youth unemployment which leads to the countries being “hampered by weak economies.” 

 

II. The distribution of ages effects countries by “weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.” Although countries with a fixed population of a young age can be detrimental, a country with an aging population can lead to a declining birth rate. This leads to labor shortages in the future which additionally stifles the economy.  

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 23, 7:08 PM

Demographics seemingly started with age as a metric many years ago and have evolved into marketing tools, political footballs, and ways to combat everything from obesity to social security. Africa is clearly the youngest and probably for a very morbid reason; AIDS and Ebola among other diseases have taken their toll on the sexually active and thus have reduced the average age of their population.

Germany seems to be the place to go for a job as the labor shortage will mean higher wages for the folks who are left. Japan has another issue; a healthy aging population that will strain the government's ability to financially take care of them.

I wonder if the unevenness of Europe is an indication of the two World wars that were fought mostly on the turf. Did some countries lose more than others? If more soldiers, presumably of baby making age, perished did this affect the countries ability to keep pace with the Germany's and Spain's of Europe?

Diet seems to play a large part as well as the Mediterranean is well represented in terms of age. Does their healthy diet of fish, nuts, legumes and olive oil make a difference?

I could spend all day postulating, but I'll leave some of the findings for you to discover...

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Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse

Moving Argentina’s Capital From Buenos Aires Could Make Things Worse | Teaching Geography | Scoop.it

"Argentina should be careful in considering the implications of the idea of moving the capital [from Buenos Aires] to Santiago del Estero. While a dramatic move might be appealing as a fresh start, it could end up aggravating the challenges of governing the country. Capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."


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APHG-U4

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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2:26 PM

It is an interesting piece of information that the country of Argentina would want to move its capital away from Buenos Aires to the small city of Santiago del Estero.  I thought it is an interesting political point brought up that by being far away from the city street mobs, the government would not have to be as accountable for its decisions.  However, the current capital city would certainly not be happy losing its title to a backwater town, and as the article suggest the leaders of the country should think long and hard before they decide on moving the capital.  People can have a strong feeling of pride living in the capital and if that is taken from them, they could lose confidence in the country.  Like the article states, "capitals, like flags, are symbols, but their choice has very real consequences."

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 13, 11:18 AM

This article discusses how there is a chance that the capital city in Argentina can change from Buenos Aires to a smaller city called Santiago Del Estero which is in the middle-north of the country. Many say this move can heal the divide between the two cities but the bigger picture it that it'll make it a lot worse. I wasn't aware that moving capital cities is actually a more common thing than we think. Buenos Aires is very over populated which is one of the reasons for wanting to move it. The major problem is an outcry from the people living in those cities and rebelling against this which could cause the government more problems. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 3:50 PM

Very interesting article on capital city moves in this century. It also works for capital cities in the US that are rural in nature and away from the bright city lights. The plus side is that capital cities located within the most populated areas of a country or state will be under intense scrutiny to do the right thing and politicians will be held accountable for their actions. Doing business in the place where you live usually has this effect.

The negative aspect of moving to a rural area is that politicians can govern in relative anonymity away from the hustle and bustle of the big city. There is also a fear factor in South American countries that we in the US don't face; coups that will overthrow governments if they don't do the right thing. A protest in Buenos Aires for instance will carry much more weight than a protest in the rural setting of Santiago del Estero.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


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APHG-all

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Olga Boldina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 10:39 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 11:33 AM

Summer reading KQ1: How has the Earth's environment changed over time?