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Letter Grades Deserve an 'F' | The Atlantic

Letter Grades Deserve an 'F'  | The Atlantic | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it
The adoption of the Common Core could usher in a new era of standards-based grading.

 

Worse, points-based grading undermines learning and creativity,rewards cheating, damages students' peer relationships and trust in their teachers, encourages students to avoid challenging work, and teaches students to value grades over knowledge.

 


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
David Snow's insight:

There is a lot to think about here. An interesting and thought-provoking article, which should lead to a change in assessment practice.

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:41 PM

"Standards-based grading establishes one high standard—mastery—for all students. Students who move often, such as kids in poverty, the military, or the foster care system, benefit the most from a standards-based system of evaluation because it would quickly and clearly communicate their competence in a given subject based on a common set of standards."

 

Hopefully, Standards- based assessment and competency-based learning will move educational assessment into the 21st century teaching and learning environments.

Jim Goldsmith's curator insight, March 18, 2014 11:15 AM

From the article:  "Teachers are trapped in a Catch-22. We are asked to assess our students precisely (many grading programs track scores to the hundredths place) and with the appearance of objectivity while using an inherently subjective process. Teachers are then asked to present their calculations on official documents and defend those numbers at parent-teacher conferences as if they are objective measures of student learning. For all the effort, time, and best intentions teachers invest in those reams of grade reports, we are lying to ourselves and to our students’ parents, cheating our students out of clear and accurate feedback on their academic process, and contributing to the greater illusion that grades are an accurate reflection of skill mastery."  Explores an important issue with well-written, thoughtful prose.

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Rescooped by David Snow from English as an international lingua franca in education
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With English comes great power, and responsibility - new study maps global language potency

With English comes great power, and responsibility - new study maps global language potency | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it
English, GLN, global language network, With English comes great power, and responsibility - new study maps global language potency

Via Nicos Sifakis
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Rescooped by David Snow from 21st Century Teaching and Technology Resources
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Letter Grades Deserve an 'F' | The Atlantic

Letter Grades Deserve an 'F'  | The Atlantic | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it
The adoption of the Common Core could usher in a new era of standards-based grading.

 

Worse, points-based grading undermines learning and creativity,rewards cheating, damages students' peer relationships and trust in their teachers, encourages students to avoid challenging work, and teaches students to value grades over knowledge.

 


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
David Snow's insight:

There is a lot to think about here. An interesting and thought-provoking article, which should lead to a change in assessment practice.

more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:41 PM

"Standards-based grading establishes one high standard—mastery—for all students. Students who move often, such as kids in poverty, the military, or the foster care system, benefit the most from a standards-based system of evaluation because it would quickly and clearly communicate their competence in a given subject based on a common set of standards."

 

Hopefully, Standards- based assessment and competency-based learning will move educational assessment into the 21st century teaching and learning environments.

Jim Goldsmith's curator insight, March 18, 2014 11:15 AM

From the article:  "Teachers are trapped in a Catch-22. We are asked to assess our students precisely (many grading programs track scores to the hundredths place) and with the appearance of objectivity while using an inherently subjective process. Teachers are then asked to present their calculations on official documents and defend those numbers at parent-teacher conferences as if they are objective measures of student learning. For all the effort, time, and best intentions teachers invest in those reams of grade reports, we are lying to ourselves and to our students’ parents, cheating our students out of clear and accurate feedback on their academic process, and contributing to the greater illusion that grades are an accurate reflection of skill mastery."  Explores an important issue with well-written, thoughtful prose.

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Teaching Online Courses – 60 Great Resources

Teaching Online Courses – 60 Great Resources | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it

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All you need to get started!

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70 useful sentences for academic writing

70 useful sentences for academic writing | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it
This post contains a random collection of 70 sentence stems you can use in your academic writing.

Via Lada Smirnova
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I can see this list of sentence stems in academic writing becoming a little project of its own.

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Rescooped by David Snow from English as an international lingua franca in education
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The Future of English in Multilingual Morocco

The Future of English in Multilingual Morocco | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it

The Istiqlal’s Secretary General Hamid Chabat has stated that English is the language of the modern time in all world countries, and that its status must be promoted to be the first foreign language for Moroccans. Along with Chabat, prominent social activist and businessman Noureddine Ayouch called in various political and media meetings for English to be introduced early in public schooling. Needless to say, these calls have demonstrated the importance of English in today’s world. . . .


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Lucas takes the TOEFL | Magoosh TOEFL Blog

Lucas takes the TOEFL | Magoosh TOEFL Blog | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it
But the opposite problem happened to the people who finished their reading and listening sections later; they were speaking while most other test-takers were trying to write essays. But at least ...
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A native-speaking English teacher who prepares students for the TOEFL iBT decided to take the test himself.   Here's his report of the experience.

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Assessment and Rubrics | Kathy Schrock's Guide to Everthing

Assessment and Rubrics | Kathy Schrock's Guide to Everthing | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it

One stop for world class assessment and rubrics resources!


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
David Snow's insight:

This is an excellent resource!

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, October 23, 2013 9:52 PM

This is an outstanding and comprehensive assessment and rubrics resource list.

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Teaching English for Academic Purposes: Possible Vocabulary Errors in Academic Writing

Teaching English for Academic Purposes: Possible Vocabulary Errors in Academic Writing | Teaching English as a Foreign Language | Scoop.it

Via keepitrealELT
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This is a neat categorization of the different types of errors that learners can make with vocabulary in academic writing.

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