Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos
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Social Studies In Action: Explorers in North America

Who were the first Europeans to step foot in the New World? What were they hoping to find? And what impact did their arrival have on the people already living there? Rob Cuddi uses essential questions like these to teach his fifth-grade students about the early explorers in North America.

 

Mr. Cuddi begins by asking guiding questions about the relationship between the early explorers and the Native Americans. The class then divides into small groups to research and answer the questions and plan their presentations. Mr. Cuddi and his students develop a rubric that will be used in evaluating the presentations. Then each group introduces an explorer and answers the essential questions using skits, poetry, and other literary devices they've been studying in English class. As the lesson concludes, students summarize important facts about each explorer and post their findings on a class data chart.

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Antiques Roadshow: Show and Tell

Antiques Roadshow: Show and Tell | Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos | Scoop.it
Show and tell is a tradition in any Kindergarten class. Here are some themes to incorporate into your show and tell times. These themes provide structure and allow equitable discussion for young students.
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My Classroom Economy - Vanguard

My Classroom Economy enables any educator to teach children financial responsibility through fun, experiential learning. It's a simple classroom economic sys...
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Geography with A Sensory Approach

Geography with A Sensory Approach | Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos | Scoop.it
Unique geography lesson idea. Perfect for middle school students but great for students in most grades, this geography lesson gets students to learn using varied sensory experiences.
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Using Maps as Primary Sources | Teachinghistory.org

Using Maps as Primary Sources | Teachinghistory.org | Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos | Scoop.it

Watch 4th-grade students carefully analyze a 1612 map of Virginia drawn by Captain John Smith and compare it to a 21st-century map to discover what was important to Smith and to the Virginia Company. 

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In Our Own Words: Voices of Virginia Indians

In Our Own Words: Voices of Virginia Indians | Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos | Scoop.it

An American Indian Resource Center Production. Two Rivers Video, Williamsburg, Virginia. 37 min. An overview of the history of Virginia Indians from pre-contact to the present, featuring interviews with the chiefs of all eight state-recognized tribes.

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How to Introduce Students to Primary Sources | Teachinghistory.org

How to Introduce Students to Primary Sources | Teachinghistory.org | Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos | Scoop.it

Fourth-grade teacher Marti MacKenzie, of Frederick Douglass Elementary School, Winchester, VA, introduces her students to primary sources. Together, she and her students analyze John White's drawings of the Powhatan and compare and contrast them to engravings made based on the drawings.

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Jump In and Read

Jump In and Read | Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos | Scoop.it
Having students share read aloud responsibilities is a great way to keep students engaged in the lesson, while providing valuable feedback to teachers. Watch this great read aloud strategy in action in this instructional teaching video.
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Social Studies In Action: Historical Change

In this lesson, David Kitts uses children's literature and the local region's agricultural heritage to introduce his first-grade class to the concept of historical change.

 

Mr. Kitts begins with a timeline from a previous unit on the family. The timeline defines periods of time based on events that students can relate to, such as when their great-great-grandparents lived, for example. Then Mr. Kitts reviews a book the class had read titled Heartland, a story about modern farming. Since all of his students live on a reservation with extended family members who farm, Mr. Kitts uses these concrete examples -- family and farming -- to help explain abstract ideas like change and the passage of time.

 

Next, Mr. Kitts reads Oxcart Man, which provides a glimpse of what life was like on a farm 200 years ago. Working together, students write comparison statements about farming tools and techniques past and present. Then they record those statements on time wheels that illustrate the similar and distinctive farming practices from each story and period in time. As the lesson concludes, students present their time wheels to the class.

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Social Studies In Action: State Government and the Role of the Citizen

How does government function at the state level? How are state laws made? In this lesson, Diane Kerr's students examine the branches of state government, the powers of each branch, and how a bill becomes a law.

 

Ms. Kerr begins by identifying the three branches of government and describing the role of each branch. Working in small groups, students use vocabulary cards and a picture of a tree to create posters that illustrate the relationship between the legislative, judicial, and executive "branches." Then students examine the process by which a bill becomes a law and make flip books that illustrate each step. Next, Ms. Kerr identifies their state representative -- the elected official who introduces bills on their behalf -- then asks students to consider what legislation they would introduce if they were representatives. As the lesson concludes, students write letters to their state representative as concerned citizens, asking her to consider their proposals.

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Social Studies In Action: Making Bread Together

As you watch "Making Bread Together," take notes on Ms. Gonzalez's instructional strategies, especially how she breaks down abstract concepts. Write down what you find interesting, surprising, or especially important about the teaching and learning in this lesson.

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John Smith Map | Teachinghistory.org

John Smith Map | Teachinghistory.org | Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos | Scoop.it

Curator Barbara Clark Smith examines John Smith’s 1612 map of a section of Virginia, asking why Smith included what he did, why he left things out, and what he hoped people who saw this map would take away from it.

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Social Studies In Action: China Through Mapping

In this lesson, Mimi Norton integrates world geography with the study of Chinese culture and history by engaging her young students in a variety of activities to locate natural and human-made landmarks on maps of China. To build background for this lesson, she has had the students create salt-dough maps of China and label them with map symbols.

 

Ms. Norton begins the lesson by reviewing map symbols with students and having them use the symbols to locate important natural and human-made land forms on desk maps. Then the class sings a song about the continents and oceans and locates them on a floor map. Ms. Norton explains that they will use what they are learning about scale in math class to enlarge a small map of China to room size. To do this, Ms. Norton first draws a large grid on the floor. Then she hands out cards, each representing a small section of China. Students then copy the information on their card to the corresponding square on the floor grid. The result is a large floor map of China. After the map has been drawn, students label the natural and human-made features at the correct locations on the map. Ms. Norton reads a story about a fictitious traveler in China and has students trace the traveler's journey. As a culminating activity, students don a Chinese dragon costume and walk to famous locations on the map.

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Social Studies In Action: Using Primary Sources

Examining primary sources and artifacts from the past gives students the chance not only to study history but to become historians and anthropologists themselves. Fifth-grade teacher Kathleen Waffle attended a summer teaching institute at Colonial Williamsburg to learn more about primary sources from the colonial period and how to use them with her students. After completing the institute, Ms. Waffle developed a unit to help students learn what life was like as the colonies began to experience economic growth.

 

In this video lesson, students examine two primary sources from the colonial period: an advertisement and a contract. Students use a graphic organizer to analyze an advertisement placed in the Virginia Gazette by a colonial silversmith. Then they work with a partner to translate a contract of indenture between a master and apprentice, rewriting the terms of the contract in their own words. Later in the unit, students interview local businesspersons to compare current business practices with those in colonial times, undertake a longer research project on life in the colonies, and put on a colonial fair.

 
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What is Historical Thinking

Need a good way to introduce what historical thinking is and why it is important? Use this video to start the conversation. http://teachinghistory.org/histor...
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3 R's: Revolution, Reaction and Reform

3 R's: Revolution, Reaction and Reform | Teaching Elementary Social Studies - Videos | Scoop.it
Gain teaching tips to help students understand complex, abstract concepts. This example uses a 4th grade social studies lesson, but can be applied to other subjects.
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