Teaching College Government
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Teaching College Government
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The Psychology of Political Ideology

The Psychology of Political Ideology | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
Identification as a liberal or conservative may have more to do with personality than with other characteristics such as religion or intelligence.

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Prison Planet.com » Reality Check: How Public Opinion Can Shape Your Daily Life

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When politics are good, and bad, for small business - Reuters

When politics are good, and bad, for small business - Reuters | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
When politics are good, and bad, for small businessReutersIs it good business to let your customers know your politics?
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Election 2012: Teaching Ideas and Resources

Election 2012: Teaching Ideas and Resources | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
Bookmark this page! We suggested ways to teach about Election 2012 and included links to lesson plans and Times features, and we'll be updating the page regularly as the march to the White House proceeds.
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The ReDistricting Game

The ReDistricting Game | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it

This is an interactive way to teach the importance of the redistricting process.  Mapmakers (and geography) are crucial to the process.  This game shows students how the process can be manipulated and if you understand local demographics and voting patterns, subtle shifts in the district borders can swing elections.  This is a great way to teaching gerrymandering and how political cartography can be.     


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Ressources pour les cours d'anglais's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:02 AM

J'ai regardé la vidéo de présentation et j'ai eu envie de jouer à ce jeu ! J'ai aimé le graphisme, la musique et la voix du narrateur. J'ai eu envie de continuer et je pense que mes élèves auraient eu également envie d'aller plus loin. Il ne me reste donc plus qu'à le tester !

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Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help

Cities on Border With Mexico Burdened by Calls for Medical Help | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
From San Diego to Brownsville, Tex., requests for assistance have become a drain on the resources of fire departments in cities on the United States border with Mexico.

 

This is a poignant example of how site and situation impact the local geographic factors. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:05 PM

This is one factor I never thought about before reading the article. Borders are one of the defining concepts of what constitutes a nation, and yet in emergencies these boundaries can become much more fluid. Of course borders in the first place are a human creation, but I imagine that along any border in the world, someone in dire need would want to get to the closest hospital, even if they're crossing a border to do so. At this point the idea of the authority implicated alongside borders might begin to seem less important. Though this makes me wonder if there are some locations which have international treaties so that local foreign departments may cross the border to help.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 2014 4:43 PM

Medical expenses are a burden on millions of people each and every year. With conditions like this on the border there is no wonder why the Calimex fire department and responders needed funds. They also need to do something about the conditions on the California/Mexican border.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, February 3, 2015 1:18 PM

After reading this article I think there should be some type of health service at the border, using the fire trucks and ambulance as a taxi is unacceptable. If people crossing the border do not have health care as stated that some done, the ambulance and fire trucks should not have to cover the cost, money should be given to those fire stations across the border and without help the departments might run into some trouble.

 In San Diego more than half of the calls that the department receives comes from the port which is equivalent to the state borders. Are people seriously that desperate for a way to get across the border quicker? 

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Infographics

Infographics | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
2012: Year of the Online Political Ad #infographics...
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Politics Web & Social

Politics Web & Social | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
How social media exposes your #political views #infographics #infografica...
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Increasing Density and Diversity Likely to Make Western States More Blue

Increasing Density and Diversity Likely to Make Western States More Blue | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
A new report finds growing urban and minority populations that will affect redistricting and reapportionment in the Mountain West.

 

The Intermountain West has been a bastion of strength for the Republican Party for many years now.  Migration into the urban areas may lead to redistricting, giving urban voters (typically leading more to the Democrats) more influence.  However, it all comes down to the critical 'where' question.  Where will the lines be drawn?  


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Electoral Geography

Electoral Geography | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
Mitt Romney’s narrow electoral vote path explained — in 5 maps...

 

The above map represents the last time the Republican Party won a presidential election in the United States.  As the polls currently are projecting that President Obama will be re-elected, the most critical questions about the voting patterns for both parties are spatial in nature. 

 

Questions to ponder: how are current political patterns changing the map?  Which states become the most pivotal for either candidate to be victorious? 

 

Tags: political, regions, spatial, unit 4 political. 


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Mitt Romney, Michael Porter & The Politics Of No Apology - Forbes

Mitt Romney, Michael Porter & The Politics Of No Apology - Forbes | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
ForbesMitt Romney, Michael Porter & The Politics Of No ApologyForbesHowever if the 20th Century philosophy of unbridled self-interest without apology is becoming increasingly unacceptable in business, in politics it is even more problematic.
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Mitt Romney would likely win if election today

Mitt Romney would likely win if election today | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
Rasmussen Reports - The best place to look for polls that are spot on...

 

The Rasmussen Reports indicate the the boost from the Republican National Convention was sufficient (especially in swing states) to make Mitt Romney the frontrunner in the election were held today of today. How will that change in the next few weeks? 


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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 3, 2012 9:34 PM
I think that the vast majority of pre-election hype and polls are primarily used to sell advertising. It's actually not a bad idea; you really have a 50/50 shot of getting it right. My guess is that Rasmussen's polls leading up to the election will swing back and forth between Romney and Obama, although often favoring Romney, as their political polls often trend in the direction of conservatives (sometimes inexplicably). While far less likely to sell advertising, it would be interesting to conduct polls that ask about what key issues Americans are concerned with, followed up by what potential solutions they see to those problems.
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The Impact of Religion on Politics

For the first time in U.S. history, a Mormon is on a major-party presidential ticket. The Wall Street Journal examines the changing role of religion in Ameri...

 

Aren't religion and politics supposed to be the two things we are counseled not to discuss to avoid controversy?  This video hits on something that plays a role for both candidates in the 2012 presidential campaign in the United States: their faith and how voters perceive their faith.  This video discusses Mitt Romney, Barack Obama and some past presidents' religious beliefs.  I feel this video handles very controversial topics in a thoughtful and fair manner given that it treats various religious traditions and political ideologies in a non-partisan manner.  The geography of religion might play an significant role in the outcome of the 2012 election.   


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Rishi Suresh's curator insight, January 16, 2014 12:40 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows how religion is an unavoidable part of a country's culture, including in politics.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This article explains how religion is related to politics, and how religion and politics interact which is related to this section

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because religion is a big part of a country and it defines many things, even the government sometimes.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the relationship between religions and people's beliefs. People's beliefs are influenced by religion, as their religion forces them to draw some rules they would have otherwise disregarded.

 

Rishi Suresh: Religion is unavoidably a part of politics. Religion is involved in many things that may at first glance seem to be outside its area of influence. 

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Politics Web & Social

Politics Web & Social | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it
How social media exposes your #political views #infographics #infografica...
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2008 Election Maps

2008 Election Maps | Teaching College Government | Scoop.it

As the election year is ramping up, now is a good time to introduce electoral geography (since there are millions of dollars been spent of this type of analysis).  Displayed is the county map of the 2008 presidential election (McCain=red, Obama=blue).  What are the geographic and demographic characteristics of the 2008 voting base of both the Republican and Democratic parties?  This is also a great map to discuss how to interpret maps--how could this map be misleading?  What additional information is needed to contextualize this data?  Follow the link for additional maps that provide attempt to visualize that context.    


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 12, 2013 1:05 PM

I really enjoyed this article, it was insctieful interesting and had very informitive visual aids. It was very interesting to see all the differnt maps prtayted thoughout the artile. I found that the infomation that they were describing was alot of things I had heard before, but the added affect of the visual aids were able to give me a deeper understading. It also really brings up some key geogragaphical regaions and shows how even thouhg a state might be blue there are still areas(towns, countis) with in the sate that are primarly red party. When this election was going on it sure seemed like it was goiing to be neck and neck, but clearly on election day bule took over .

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 1:01 PM

It is amazing how a map can throw people off. It looks like McCain was winning but at the end Obama has won because more people have voted for him than his competitor. Also in the shaded blue area are much more populated then the areas in red because the red area are surrounded by woods and also the red area is like the suburbs of the city. It is very different how maps are portrayed and how misleading they can be. Never depend on one source find as many as you can to make your interpretations   

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:42 AM

Electoral college maps can sometimes trick you because it looks like McCain won but although most of mid west is republican there isnt a large population so they dont get as many votes as states with bigger populations like California, New York, Texas, Florida, etc.