Teaching Character Traits through Literature
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Millennial Students Aren’t All the Same

Millennial Students Aren’t All the Same | Teaching Character Traits through Literature | Scoop.it

"'A disservice is done to any student cohort when they are globally defined by a single set of character traits. Within any generation, there is diversity and in the Millennial Generation, there is considerable diversity in background, personality and learning style.' (p. 223) So concludes a lengthy and detailed article that seeks, among other goals, to 'demystify' the characteristics commonly attributed to students belonging to this generation."


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5 Character Traits You Should Show in Interviews (and How) - Mashable

5 Character Traits You Should Show in Interviews (and How) - Mashable | Teaching Character Traits through Literature | Scoop.it
5 Character Traits You Should Show in Interviews (and How)
Mashable
When asked behavioral questions during your interview, prove it by highlighting the moments in your career where your honesty, trustworthiness and reliability yielded great results.

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Creating a Character Traits Thesaurus

Creating a Character Traits Thesaurus | Teaching Character Traits through Literature | Scoop.it
Because my students need to have a larger repertoire of "Character Traits" to choose from when describing characters in the books we read, we are creating a Visual Thesaurus of traits using Tagul. ...

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 2, 2013 9:33 PM

This lesson plan is a great way to incorporate a range of technology into a lesson. In this case Paul Solarz (the teacher) realized that students needed to learn to use a thesaurus, and chose to have them focus on traits, as they are a key component of literature. After providing lists of character traits to the students he taught them how to use Tagel (to create the word clouds) and thesaurus.com (free online). Click through to the website to read the full post. You will also find a link to the many word clouds that were created by his students) for some of the features included within it.

If you have students whom are ELL you may want to check out wordsift.com. It uses visual thesaurus (slightly different than thesaurus.com) and has other resources that help many learners, including images that are associated with specific words, the ability to create a workspace and pull in words and images, and lists of words (such as ELA, science, math, history) so students may learn which words are important in different subjects. WordSift does not allow you to make word clouds as do the many other word cloud tools but is a valuable tool to learn to use.

Mark McMahon's curator insight, September 5, 2013 1:15 PM

really takes the wind out of a Jane Austen novel.

Lauren Thorncraft's curator insight, May 26, 2014 4:47 AM

This resource is a terrific educational and interactive website relevant to the English Syllabus for Stage 2 learners, and links to outcome; 

WRITING AND REPRESENTING 2

OUTCOME

A student:
› identifies and uses language forms and features in their own writing appropriate to a range of purposes, audiences and contexts EN2-7B.

 

The site explain's a lesson idea that could be used to increase student's vocabulary on how to describe character traits/characteristics when composing a writing passage or story. It allows student's to broaden their vocabulary repertoire, and gain skills to be able to compose and present well-structured and coherent texts, that include descriptive and interesting character's. 

 

This site can be used following a lesson that has just explained what traits/characteristics are (such as my IWB resource). The site encourages student's to choose a word from the 'characteristic list' (such as the one on my IWB resource). Then determine its common antonym with help from the thesaurus and create a word cloud for it using the synonyms that were listed on thesaurus.com. Additionally, the site displays a link ‘tagul.com’ which is an ICT resource which allows student’s to create ‘word clouds’. Another great tool to introduce to student’s to assist with expanding vocabulary. 


Overall, this is a great resource that will provide an opportunity for students to learn about characteristics, and accumulate a diverse repertoire of new vocabulary and hopefully assist with writing well-structured and coherent texts.

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All Things Reading

All Things Reading | Teaching Character Traits through Literature | Scoop.it
Use word clouds for analyzing a character's traits. (Use word clouds for analyzing a character's traits. http://t.co/30L3mCdM)
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4 outcomes of character-based leadership

4 outcomes of character-based leadership | Teaching Character Traits through Literature | Scoop.it
"Leadership is Influence, Nothing more, Nothing less." -- John Maxwell As our world becomes more complex, with more activities and beliefs tugging for a...

 

As our world becomes more complex, with more activities and beliefs tugging for attention on the world stage, what difference does leadership make? And why would anyone promote a particular type of leadership?


I wrote a couple of years ago that there are only two sources of leadership: that which comes from our position and that which comes from our character, our “who-we-are.” Character isn’t a list of traits or behaviors. Character comes from a Latin word that means image. Our character is who we are on the inside.


A friend once said his training as a triathlete changed when his attitude changed from practicing for a triathlon to deciding he was a triathlete. There is a difference between attempting a triathlon and becoming a triathlete. There is a difference between teaching a lesson and being a teacher. And there is a huge difference between leading some group or activity and being a leader.


Being a leader produces four key outcomes that will help your team or organization thrive:


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Character Traits (D-E) | Learning Chocolate

Character Traits (D-E) | Learning Chocolate | Teaching Character Traits through Literature | Scoop.it
This is a flash game for learning vocabulary words including dainty, daring, day dreamer, decent, decisive, defiant, dependable, dependant, determined, diligent, easy going, energetic, envious, an expert, extroverted.

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Educating for Intellectual Character

Educating for Intellectual Character | Teaching Character Traits through Literature | Scoop.it

Educating for Intellectual Characterby Jason Baehr on January 2, 2013In his recent book Character Compass, Boston University professor Scott Seider tells the story of three successful Boston-area charter schools each with a strong but relatively unique commitment to character education. To capture some of the differences between these character education programs, Seider employs a distinction between moral character, civic character, and “performance character.” Moral character can be thought of as the character of a good neighbor. It includes qualities like trustworthiness, kindness, and compassion. Civic character is the character of a good citizen, including traits like tolerance, respect, and community-mindedness. Performance character refers to “the qualities necessary to achieve one’s potential in endeavors ranging from art to athletics,” for example, perseverance, ingenuity, and grit (Seider 2012, p. 3).

Seider’s tripartite distinction is helpful and illuminating. Too often the literature in character education equivocates between different concepts of character or between actual character strengths and related but distinct moral or intellectual skills and aptitudes. Being clear about the different dimensions of personal character is an important first step in dispelling some of this conceptual confusion, which in turn is important to the actual practice of character education in schools.

However, as Seider himself acknowledges in the closing pages of his book (pp. 231-32), his taxonomy neglects a dimension of personal character which some have argued is at least as relevant to education as moral, civic, or performance character. This is the dimension of intellectual character. A person’s intellectual character is a function of what she believes, how she feels, and how she is disposed to act in connection with “epistemic” goods like knowledge, truth, and understanding. Good intellectual character is comprised of “intellectual virtues,” which are the character traits of a good thinker or learner. They include traits like curiosity, wonder, intellectual carefulness, intellectual thoroughness, open-mindedness, intellectual courage, intellectual rigor, and intellectual humility.

An approach to character education that gives primacy to intellectual virtues has numerous advantages.

First, it provides a way of fleshing out certain familiar educational aims that are important but nebulous. This includes the aim of “lifelong learning.” Everyone agrees that education should fostering lifelong learning. But what exactly does this mean? What are the qualities or dispositions of a lifelong learner? Intellectual virtues provide an answer to these questions, for they just are the personal qualities of a lifelong learner. Thus educating for intellectual virtues provides a concrete and strategic way of pursuing the worthy but elusive goal of lifelong learning.

Second, “intellectual character education,” as we might call it, sidesteps one of the main objections raised against more traditional approaches to character education. Some object to these approaches on the grounds that they rely on controversial notions of morality that are out of place in public education. This objection has little force against the attempt to educate for intellectual virtues. Again, intellectual virtues are the character traits required for good thinking and learning. They presuppose no controversial moral commitments.

Third, educating for intellectual virtues also sidesteps the familiar objection that in an age of academic standards and high-stakes standardized testing, a systematic focus on character development is unrealistic from a practical standpoint. Intellectual virtues aim at knowledge and understanding. And they express themselves in intellectual actions like listening, interpreting, analyzing, reflecting, judging, and evaluating. Therefore, educating for intellectual virtues naturally lends itself to an active and critical engagement with academic content and skills. One needn’t choose between educating for academic standards and educating for intellectual virtues. The two go hand in hand.

While the language and concepts of intellectual character and intellectual virtue do not yet figure prominently in the discourse on character education, this is beginning to change. One illustration is a three-year grant project I am directing at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles that is sponsored by a major grant from the John Templeton Foundation. The Intellectual Virtues and Education Project is bringing together leading scholars in education, philosophy, and psychology to discuss and conduct new research on intellectual virtues and their importance to educational theory and practice. This includes, among several other events, a major conference this summer on educating for intellectual virtues. The project also involves the implementation of an intellectual virtues educational model in the Intellectual Virtues Academy of Long Beach, a new grades 6-8 charter school in Long Beach, CA. Read more....


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Twitter / mrskimbridges: @TweetDCS_SIS SIS 3rd graders ...

Twitter / mrskimbridges: @TweetDCS_SIS SIS 3rd graders ... | Teaching Character Traits through Literature | Scoop.it
@TweetDCS_SIS SIS 3rd graders know that character traits + evidence = a deeper understanding in reading! #DCS2core http://t.co/Hwy67tfqAT
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