Teaching: Aspect One - Lesson Planning & Special Education
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Writing@CSU

Writing@CSU | Teaching: Aspect One - Lesson Planning & Special Education | Scoop.it
Writing@CSU is the home of Colorado State University's open-access learning environment, the Writing Studio. Use this site to write, learn to write, take writing classes, and access resources for writing teachers.
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veronica's comment, March 26, 2014 10:35 AM
Putting your objectives in order is something you need to do as well. Start out with the basic common information that they would need to know then just work your way up. This can make a huge difference and have an even bigger impact on how quickly, correctly your students take in and learn and understand the concept that you are teaching.
veronica's comment, March 26, 2014 10:45 AM
Checking to make sure all the students are on the same page needs to be done. If some students or mabye just one student is confused you should help them to grasp the concept so everyone understands what you are teaching.
veronica's comment, March 26, 2014 10:52 AM
Building a sample lesson plan will help to make things easier so you can get an understanding of what your actual lesson plan will contain. This will actually help you to stay more organized as a teacher and keep your information accurate.
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Special Education Teachers: Effective Teaching Strategies | Concordia University - Portland Online

Special Education Teachers: Effective Teaching Strategies | Concordia University - Portland Online | Teaching: Aspect One - Lesson Planning & Special Education | Scoop.it
Good special education teachers use trial and error to find techniques that work best for their students. Here are some effective teaching strategies to try.
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veronica's comment, February 17, 2014 10:31 AM
Setting clear and precise goals for the students is an important factor on teaching special education. Take breaks between assignments so that the student is able to refocus their attention on the goal of the assignment. Using visuals will help the student understand/process more efficiently than just talking aloud.
veronica's comment, February 17, 2014 10:34 AM
Remember as a special education teacher to be flexible, understanding, and patient with the students. The teachers should add creativity to the work that he/she gives to her students to complete. The teacher should also modify the work for the students who need it so that they will be able to understand the work that they were assigned.
veronica's comment, February 19, 2014 10:18 AM
When looking for a job that deals with special education the most important factor to remember is although you may have all the degrees that you need some jobs may be better for others. You have to remember that these children have much more complex requests/needs that you will constantly have to attend to. This job is also time consuming, it is crucial to know that there is much work and time put into this job,even after hours.
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Careers - Special Education Teachers

Careers - Special Education Teachers | Teaching: Aspect One - Lesson Planning & Special Education | Scoop.it
Special education teachers teach children who have special learning needs or problems such as trouble speaking. Most teach students in elementary, middle, and high schools, though some work with infants and toddlers.
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veronica's comment, February 18, 2014 10:10 AM
Government economists plan for jobs in special education through 2020 to vary by grade level. Jobs for high school teachers will most likely grow slower. Jobs in preschools, kindergartens, elementary schools, and middle schools to grow faster.
veronica's comment, February 19, 2014 10:23 AM
The United States of Labor Statistics estimated the average earnings of special education teachers in 2011. Preschool/Kindergarten/Elementary-$56,460 Middle School-$58,420 High School-$59,080
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Strategies for Effective Lesson Planning | CRLT

Strategies for Effective Lesson Planning | CRLT | Teaching: Aspect One - Lesson Planning & Special Education | Scoop.it
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veronica's comment, March 26, 2014 10:20 AM
Planning educating/entertaining learning activities the students can do will help them understand what your teaching and be interested in it. If the students want to learn what you are teaching this will make your job easier and will help the students to understand/complete whats been given.
veronica's comment, March 26, 2014 10:23 AM
Giving your students a time on when the work needs to be completed is key. You as a teacher have to make sure that their is plenty of time to complete the assignment that you have given. It's better to make sure the students aren't cramming in everything and just doing it to get it done, but actually learning it.
veronica's comment, March 26, 2014 10:25 AM
Presenting your lesson plan to your students can help them as well. Its good to let them know what they will soon be learning, and what assignments they will be asked to complete. Making the lesson plan available for the students to look at could make everything easier as well. (writing it on the board)
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Special Education Teachers : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Special Education Teachers : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics | Teaching: Aspect One - Lesson Planning & Special Education | Scoop.it
Special education teachers work with students who have a wide range of learning, mental, emotional, and physical disabilities. They adapt general education lessons and teach various subjects, such as reading, writing, and math, to students with mild and moderate disabilities. They also teach basic skills, such as literacy and communication techniques, to students with severe disabilities.
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veronica's comment, February 17, 2014 10:11 AM
Special education teachers help to educate students with various types of disabilities. They will also help teach basic skills such as reading and speaking. They are to help the students understand basic skills that they will need to know in your everyday life. The teachers are to teach them to understand/follow directions and respond/answer questions.
veronica's comment, February 17, 2014 10:20 AM
Special education teachers will have to do things a little differently than your average teacher. For example being taught in small groups or one on one will help the student more efficiently than as a whole. They will have to change/break down lessons so that the students are able to understand. They should also keep closer contact with the parents so they are able to be informed on how their child is doing in the class.
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6 Strategies for Teaching Special Education Classes | Concordia University - Portland Online

6 Strategies for Teaching Special Education Classes | Concordia University - Portland Online | Teaching: Aspect One - Lesson Planning & Special Education | Scoop.it
Here are some strategies that special education teachers can use to benefit all of their students.
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veronica's comment, February 18, 2014 10:20 AM
Establishing guidelines and limitations in the classroom will set a standard for the students behavior. Examples: Let the students know that everyone in the classroom will be treated equally. You must also let the students know what behaviors/actions are allowed and not tolerated in the classroom. Reward/compliment them for good behavior..punish them for bad.
veronica's comment, February 18, 2014 10:23 AM
Forcing a student to do something that may cause them anxiety and make them nervous can create unwanted behaviors in the classroom. The sooner the teacher begins to know her students, the better. Knowing your students strengths and weakness could make all the difference. You have to remember that every student learns and understands things differently.
veronica's comment, February 18, 2014 10:23 AM
Forcing a student to do something that may cause them anxiety and make them nervous can create unwanted behaviors in the classroom. The sooner the teacher begins to know her students, the better. Knowing your students strengths and weakness could make all the difference. You have to remember that every student learns and understands things differently.