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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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How a Publishing Podcast Can Change a Book's Life

How a Publishing Podcast Can Change a Book's Life | Teaching | Scoop.it

A publishing podcast is about creating intimacy with the reader. It's not a bullet point or marketing strategy, says Anshuman Iddamsetty of PRH Canada.


Via Marianela Camacho Alfaro, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Multimedia Journalism
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Shaping the future: BBC is giving over 1 million kids the key to becoming digital innovators

Shaping the future: BBC is giving over 1 million kids the key to becoming digital innovators | Teaching | Scoop.it

“As part of the Make it Digital program launched today, the BBC announced a partnership with 25 companies to develop what they are calling the ‘Micro Bit’ – a tiny and simplistic computer that will be distributed among 1 million school children in...”


Via Andy Bull
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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Resources for Using iPads in Grades K-2

Resources for Using iPads in Grades K-2 | Teaching | Scoop.it
Looking for advice on integrating iPads in K-2 classrooms? In this curated guide, we've compiled resources to help you find apps, learn about best practices, and explore ideas for engaging activities.

Via Becky Roehrs, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Autism Supports
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Positive Traits of Autism – Part 9 – Intelligence

Positive Traits of Autism – Part 9 – Intelligence | Teaching | Scoop.it
Often when autistic people are asked what they think the biggest positive of their autism is they say intelligence.

Via Autism Daily Newscast, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Autism Daily Newscast's curator insight, March 11, 2015 7:37 AM

So many great traits of #autism - Paddy-Joe comes up with number 9

Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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How to Optimize Video and Images for Google Search - Position²

How to Optimize Video and Images for Google Search - Position² | Teaching | Scoop.it

iNeoMarketing.com bridges the gap between your MarTech and your in-house experience. Contact us.


Via marketingIO, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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marketingIO's curator insight, March 11, 2015 6:52 PM

Look: it's not SEO 301, but it's quick and painless.

Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Supports for Leadership
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Anticipate: The Art of Leading by Looking Ahead

Anticipate: The Art of Leading by Looking Ahead | Teaching | Scoop.it

How to increase your personal visionary capacity, anticipate trends, and lead by looking ahead.


Via Sílvia Montserrat, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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Google Docs - Adding a Table of Contents | innovative schools

Google Docs - Adding a Table of Contents | innovative schools | Teaching | Scoop.it
If you, or your students, are producing longer documents in Google Docs, the Table of Contents feature may be useful.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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What we can learn from the 'hybrid society' of virtual and physical worlds

What we can learn from the 'hybrid society' of virtual and physical worlds | Teaching | Scoop.it
In order to understand today's experiences in life we must stop considering the virtual and physical worlds as separate, and begin to see them as one idea.

Via David W. Deeds, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Ivon Prefontaine, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, March 11, 2015 5:00 PM

Interesting! 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 11, 2015 10:56 PM

It is interesting that work done by Donna Haraway, Don Idhe, and Martin Heidegger are not used here. Haraway has written influentially about the concept of hybrid people.

 

@ivon_ehd1

John Caswell's curator insight, June 8, 2015 3:52 AM

The big topic of our times..

Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Education
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How to teach… the brain

How to teach… the brain | Teaching | Scoop.it
Why do you always remember how to ride a bike? Is a brain really more powerful than a computer? Here’s our guide to teaching all things cerebral in class

Via iPamba, Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Better writing in 30 seconds | Writing Dynamo

Better writing in 30 seconds | Writing Dynamo | Teaching | Scoop.it
Get instant feedback on your writing style, voice, grammar, and more with Writing Dynamo. Start now!
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Education
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How parents create narcissistic children - Hamilton Spectator

How parents create narcissistic children - Hamilton Spectator | Teaching | Scoop.it
Just about everybody has one raging narcissist to deal with, sooner or later — on the job, in social situations or (God forbid) in the home. How did he get this way, we wonder? What was his childhood like?

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from North London Paranormal Investigations
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UK gears up for a spaceport in 2018 - strangetoday.com

UK gears up for a spaceport in 2018 - strangetoday.com | Teaching | Scoop.it
Following a three-month consultation with feedback from airports and companies, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), has today revealed government-backed plans to “establish a spaceport”, and enable commercial space flights to become a reality in the UK from as early as 2018. “I want Britain to lead the way in commercial spaceflight,” said aviation minister Robert Goodwill, whoRead More

Via North London Paranormal Investigations
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Autism Supports
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Brain structure varies depending on how trusting people are of others, study shows

Brain structure varies depending on how trusting people are of others, study shows | Teaching | Scoop.it
A recent study from the University of Georgia shows differences in brain structure according to how trusting people are of others.


Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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35 Psychological Tricks To Help You Learn Better - InformED

35 Psychological Tricks To Help You Learn Better - InformED | Teaching | Scoop.it
Have you ever considered letting your students listen to hardcore punk while they take their mid-term exam? Decided to do away with Power Point presentat
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Technology Integration into Education
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How can games change learning?

How can games change learning? | Teaching | Scoop.it
This article was previously published in EntrepreneurMiddleEast.com.You can’t teach someone how to be an entrepreneur from a textbook or a lecture. I know, I have tried.

Via David W. Deeds, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Education
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How to teach… the brain

How to teach… the brain | Teaching | Scoop.it
Why do you always remember how to ride a bike? Is a brain really more powerful than a computer? Here’s our guide to teaching all things cerebral in class

Via iPamba, Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Education
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21st Century Skills Definition

21st Century Skills Definition | Teaching | Scoop.it
The term 21st century skills refers to a broad set of knowledge, skills, work habits, and character traits that are believed—by educators, school reformers, college professors, employers, and others—to be critically important to success in today’s world, particularly in collegiate programs and contemporary careers and workplaces. Generally speaking, 21st century skills can be applied in all …

Via Karen Bonanno, Suvi Salo, Ivon Prefontaine, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 11, 2015 10:50 PM

There are a lot of link and the like so it will take time to read and digest.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Michael Jongen's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:13 AM

Great for advocacy and defining the skills we need in the 21st century school library

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, April 19, 2015 5:34 PM

A recent article on The Glossary of Education Reform began with the basic definition of 21st Century Skills and moved into the debate surrounding the implications of teaching cross disciplinary, process skills  – the 21st century aspect of education – versus teaching content – viewed as a 20th century focus.  In our era of standardized testing this debate is happening everyday.  In struggling schools – often schools of poverty – the push to maintain the traditional focus on content knowledge ties the hands of teachers who want to provide a richer curriculum for students. Teachers in poorer schools struggle with filling academic gaps and providing interventions. In our wealthier schools, students often have the background knowledge of facts or the technology and home support to get the facts that will take them to higher levels of thinking.

It is critical as we want to prepare all students for success in college and careers that our poorest students have the experience with thinking skills, problem solving, and cross disciplinary exploration.  As it currently stands, many of our poorer students are passing standardized tests, graduating from school unprepared to compete with students who have experienced a more complex education.  We must provide all students a 21st century education – we will need to re-invent our struggling schools to build strong foundations that allow students to experience the same educational depth and complexity offered at wealthier schools.

Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Effective Education
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The Difference Between Praise That Promotes Narcissism vs. Healthy Self-Esteem

The Difference Between Praise That Promotes Narcissism vs. Healthy Self-Esteem | Teaching | Scoop.it
Telling your kids that they're superfabulous encourages narcissistic thinking, researchers say. And that doesn't bode well for their future happiness. Better to recognize effort and express warmth.

 

"When a kid does something amazing, you want to tell her so. You might tell her that she’s very smart. You might tell her that she’s a very special kid. Or you might say that she must have worked really hard.

On the surface, they all sound like the same compliments. But according to Brad Bushman, a communications and psychology professor at Ohio State University, the first two increase the child’s chances of becoming a narcissist. Only the last one raises the child’s self-esteem and keeps her ego in check."


Via iPamba, Ivon Prefontaine, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 11, 2015 10:54 PM

It is important to provide process oriented feedback/praise. It needs to be directive and move the person forward.Are we sure narcissists have high self-esteem?

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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A New Kind Of Literary Analysis

A New Kind Of Literary Analysis | Teaching | Scoop.it
Does our scientific justification of the arts suggest that we've lost faith in literature?

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Dennis Ricardo Hidalgo's insight:

So, this is what we have known since we picked up our first book, at least, some of us, namely, that reading stories, quality literature can make us better humans in more than one way. 

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:07 PM

This is one of those articles for which my immediate reaction is, "I agree, but..."

 

I can't help but agree with author Ethan Gilsdorf's saying that "Hopefully this data will provide further ammunition against those nay-sayers who argue the arts are a luxury. Now school boards can claim books make us better leaders, better decision makers, better business-people." but...

 

I can't help but agree with Gilsdorf that "It's sad we need another sudy loaded with finite statistics to defend...," storytelling. but...

 

I can't help but, at least partially agree with Gilsdorf's  contention that, "Perhaps science coming to the rescue is not a surprising state of affairs. American culture has always been driven by results. Profits. Numbers. The bottom line. We're lean and mean. We don't pretend to have much time or patience for superfluous or non-measurable activities that drain resources and take our eyes off the ball game." but...

 

I only wish that Ethan Gilsdorf, author of this article, had recognized the value of evidence coming from sources that quite often speak to elements of knowing outside the area of knowing we who already know the value of literary reading and who are too often thereby dismissed as biased incapable of being objective. 

 

We may speak well to those who speak our language, but let's face it. We speak about a kind of knowing that is not as commonly seen as having value  as we might wish it were. We speak of wisdom and we speak of it indirectly speaking more often, I would guess, to the heart hoping that through the heart a meaningful message finds significant traction in the intellect. 

 

In a sense, science short cuts the journey for all of us who first recognize that the upside of science is that it relies upon measureable truth; a basis that I would hope is seen as a starting point for all thinking people whether they also appreciate litearary reading or not.

 

But, in science's ability to reach those who understand the value of measureable truth, who DO NOT engage in literary reading, science often reaches an audience with a measure of success that we who love literary reading do not reach so successfully. And, among the element of society that they reach more successfully than we do are people who vote for educational funding, people who believe that literary reading has no practical value, people who believe facts and skills are the whole story of knowing. And, reaching those folks is more critical than ever. 

 

Of course we wish that those who we haven't reached would have recognized the value of the wisdom that literary reading brings to humanity through the fine jobs we've done in promoting literary reading. But, science is at least catching the attention of many of those who we hadn't reached. 

 

One of my favorite experiences in life has been the experience of having a "light go on." You know those, "Duh! Why didn't I think of that?" moments. 

 

They're great moments, and I usually have someone who said something in a way I was capable of hearing in a way I hadn't thought about before. And, more often than not, those moments opened  whole new area of mindfulness for me that made it easier for me to allow a whole slew of related new perspectives to find their way into the incomplete mosaic of my previous understanding and appreciation for the arena of knowing that the new "Ah Ha!" moment had brought to my knowing.

 

Though Gilsdorf bemoans the need to rely upon measurables that science brings to literary appreciation, we should recognize two important contributions they are making:

 

First, we who teach literary reading are expected, like or not to make the connection between literary reading and preparing students for college and career, the two criteria for a good education, that are dominating the conversation about educational reform. Science is providing kind of data that is extremely difficult to collect, synthesize, and integrate into data-driven decision making processes.

 

Second, though presented as data which may generate a Pavlovian negative response among the literati, we should note that they are focusing upon literary reading's great contributions of enhanced understanding of the world within which we all must get along. They are somehow quantifying, for those who believe quantitative data is the only data worth paying attention to, the benefits of empathy, compassion, and the influences of literature upon which human beings' consideration of what it is to pursue not just a quantitatively successful life, but also a qualitatively successful life. 

 

Rather than bemoan science's focus upon finding  the measurables of literary reading, perhaps we might consider finding ways to return the favor by finding literary means for reaching the anti-science crowd out there.

 

 

Don't miss the links to several articles and reports defending literary reading  coming to us from the science-side of knowing.

 

 http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google  Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.