Purposeful Pedagogy
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Purposeful Pedagogy
An online library of effective teaching techniques and methodologies which inspire enduring and meaningful learning.
Curated by Dean J. Fusto
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How We Learn What We Learn

From the big thinkers of the previous century that have influenced our own understanding of learning, to the strategic implementation of those pricnciples in designing pedagogy, this text sheds light on the great heritage that we draw upon in our...

Via Ness Crouch, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Rabbi Avi Bossewitch's curator insight, March 3, 2015 8:16 PM

Excellent review of 20th century ed thought leaders and how they inform 21st century learning

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 20, 2015 7:20 PM

A short biography of a number of leading thinkers contributors work in education i.e. Dewey, Montessori, Freire, etc.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Skylly_W's comment, June 15, 2016 10:40 PM
Great Share
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18 Great TED Ed Video Lessons for Social Studies Teachers

18 Great TED Ed Video Lessons for Social Studies Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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How to prevent accidental plagiarism in an online world by  LESLEY VOS

How to prevent accidental plagiarism in an online world by  LESLEY VOS | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
BY LESLEY VOS

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Rod Matheson's curator insight, May 7, 6:30 AM
This site provides guidance in the area of copyright in the digital world. 
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4 Phases Of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers - TeachThought PD

4 Phases Of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers - TeachThought PD | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
The post 4 Phases Of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers appeared first on TeachThought PD.

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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, May 4, 3:34 PM
I love the simple, yet informative, graphic that opens this article for teachers about the 4 phases of Inquiry-Based Learning. We talk a lot about inquiry and how important it is to engage students through questioning but how much attention is given to the teaching professional to make sure s/he knows how to implement a quality program? This is a wonderful article to share with teachers and it's great for librarians, too. Think about how we use these 4 phases every time a patron comes in looking for a book suggestion. You interact to get a feel for who they are, you get clarification about what they're looking for, you engage in the "reference interview" to narrow down  your suggestions, and then you provide a list of suggestions or "design" the reading experience. We've been modeling this for years! Enjoy!
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Research Guides: Education: Mathematics Teacher Resources

Research Guides: Education: Mathematics Teacher Resources | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

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"The University of Michigan Library offers this helpful list of web resources for teaching mathematics. This list includes items that will appeal to K-12 mathematics instructors, adult educators, and college level mathematics instructors alike. Resources are divided into three categories: resources for teachers (most resources fall into this category), resources for algebra, and resources for statistics. While some of the links included on this list no longer work, most will take visitors to working pages. Included are teaching tips, videos to incorporate into the classroom, websites, free online textbooks, printable worksheets, games, and more. The diversity of these resources offers a useful one-stop shop for instructors looking for additional materials or ideas."


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Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond

Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Steven Johnson discusses where good ideas come from, and TeachThought offers takeaways for teachers.

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Mick jones's comment, April 28, 6:56 AM
Visit here:- https://soundcloud.com/dove-nobel/the-best-technical-support-for-mozilla-browser
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 6, 5:45 PM
Reading the pedagogic lay-of-the-land is an essential and challenging skill for teachers to learn. Good ideas emerge in the classroom, but it takes a practiced eye to recognize them and turn them into teachable moments.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, May 10, 10:04 AM
Where Good Ideas Come From & How Your Classroom Can Respond
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Blogging for Teachers

Blogging for Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Blogging is very popular among students, but what about teachers? They are catching up, and it’s easy to see why as blogging enables them to keep in touch with their students and colleagues outside of work, while at the same time sharing insightful ideas. The following article will teach you why and how to run a blog as a teacher.

Reasons You Should Blog

Share ideas – sharing your ideas and thoughts with the world allows you to become a part of an active online community and exchange ideas with other blogging teachers, as well as readers.Keep up with your students – it will help you become more in tune with the way they think, learn, and live their lives.Develop yourself personally and professionally – another reason why great teachers blog is because it allows them to never stop learning.Lead by example – blogging yourself is one of the easiest ways to get your students to blog as well.
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Angélica Potes's curator insight, April 18, 10:26 PM
At this moment, the evolution of technology allows us to take advantage of every minimal feature to our own benefit. One of the greatest values of the today's technology is the communication since it has improved a lot at such a point that we can choose the way we are going to communicate, texting, talking or by a videocall. Hence, there are some other alternatives like blogs which are something more formal where we can put in use in the role of teachers with our students. In that way, we can avoid having our students in the social networks, something that can be taken as possible misunderstandings in a future. Therefore, we can share documents, write messages, publish ideas and thoughts, post videos and we can ask students to comment important things, create forums and to develop tasks that we can give them by this virtual way.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 19, 2:13 PM
There are some good ideas. An essential part is to discover one's niche, otherwise the blog becomes inauthentic and formulaic. It is just one of many.
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Teaching strategies about source credibility

Teaching strategies about source credibility | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Here are some teaching strategies we can use to evaluate the credibility of a resource ..."


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Kris Atkinson's curator insight, May 14, 9:48 PM
Well all have learnt about fake news in recent times so ensuring sources are creditable is important. Is Wikipedia reliable???
Jeannette Delamoir's curator insight, May 21, 7:22 PM
No matter what discipline we teach, it is crucial to help students assess source credibility. It's a real-life skill that develops reasoning and analysis, and will protect them from scams and scammers as well as fake news! 
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How To Master The Art Of Taking Better Notes

How To Master The Art Of Taking Better Notes | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
The process of writing something down can help you better remember it, so here’s how to get the most out of your notes.

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Opinion | The Wrong Way to Keep Kids Safe From Predators

Opinion | The Wrong Way to Keep Kids Safe From Predators | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
They need more than protection; they need the chance to develop survival skills.

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Teachers Going Gradeless – Arthur Chiaravalli – Medium

Teachers Going Gradeless – Arthur Chiaravalli – Medium | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it


After years of teaching using the principles of standards-based learning and grading, I encountered two findings that radically changed my perspective on assessment, grading, and reporting. 

The first finding comes from Ruth Butler (1988, as cited in Wiliam 2011) regarding feedback. Butler examined 3 types of feedback: scores alone, comments alone, and scores with comments. Her study showed that scores alone made students either complacent or unmotivated depending on how well they did. Scores with comments were just as ineffective in that students focused entirely on the score and ignored the comments. Surprisingly, it was the students who received comments alone that demonstrated the most improvement. 

 The second finding comes from John Hattie (2012) whose synthesis of 800 meta-studies showed that student self-assessment/self-grading topped the list of educational interventions with the highest effect size. By teaching students how to accurately self-assess based on clear criteria, teachers empower them to become “self-regulated learners” able to monitor, regulate, and guide their own learning. The reason students never develop these traits is that our monopoly on assessment, feedback, and grading has trained students to adopt an attitude of total passivity in the learning process.



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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, April 11, 8:17 PM
After years of teaching using the principles of standards-based learning and grading, I encountered two findings that radically changed my perspective on assessment, grading, and reporting. 

The first finding comes from Ruth Butler (1988, as cited in Wiliam 2011) regarding feedback. Butler examined 3 types of feedback: scores alone, comments alone, and scores with comments. Her study showed that scores alone made students either complacent or unmotivated depending on how well they did. Scores with comments were just as ineffective in that students focused entirely on the score and ignored the comments. Surprisingly, it was the students who received comments alone that demonstrated the most improvement. 

The second finding comes from John Hattie (2012) whose synthesis of 800 meta-studies showed that student self-assessment/self-grading topped the list of educational interventions with the highest effect size. By teaching students how to accurately self-assess based on clear criteria, teachers empower them to become “self-regulated learners” able to monitor, regulate, and guide their own learning. The reason students never develop these traits is that our monopoly on assessment, feedback, and grading has trained students to adopt an attitude of total passivity in the learning process.
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Eight things I learned my first year of teaching with project-based learning -

Eight things I learned my first year of teaching with project-based learning - | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"My first year of teaching with project-based learning provided as much learning for me as it did my students ..."


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How Kids Benefit From Learning To Explain Their Math Thinking

How Kids Benefit From Learning To Explain Their Math Thinking | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Students are never too young to explain their thinking. When teachers encourage them to back up their claims with evidence from a young age, they will be more

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The Ultimate EdTech Chart for Teachers and Educators

The Ultimate EdTech Chart for Teachers and Educators | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Below is a chart we have been working on during the last few weeks. It features a number of key websites and online resources arranged into different categories.  We did not cover all school subjects but we will be adding more resources to the list in the future.  Our purpose is to provide teachers and educators (and students) with a repository of EdTech websites that can potentially help them with the teaching of their content areas. The great thing about this work is that it is curated by teachers for teachers.

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Reaching Students who have suffered trauma

Reaching Students who have suffered trauma | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
By Dr. Lori Desautels

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Jeannette Delamoir's curator insight, May 13, 7:24 PM
This short article delivers inspiring suggestions for nurturing and "managing" students whose emotional states may be getting in the way of learning. This gives me constructive ideas, but also cautions me that a full-on experience may overload some students if they are not ready for it.
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6 Good Virtual Science Lab Apps for Students

6 Good Virtual Science Lab Apps for Students | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
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The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet [Infographic]

The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet [Infographic] | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

"Critical thinking skills truly matter in learning. Why? Because they are life skills we use every day of our lives. Everything from our work to our recreational pursuits, and all that’s in between, employs these unique and valuable abilities. Consciously developing them takes thought-provoking discussion and equally thought-provoking questions to get it going. Begin right here with the Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet.


It’s a simple infographic offering questions that work to develop critical thinking on any given topic. Whenever your students discover or talk about new information, encourage them to use these questions for sparking debate and the sharing of opinions and insights among each other. Together they can work at building critical thinking skills in a collaborative and supportive atmosphere."


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Lilydale High School's curator insight, May 6, 7:45 PM
Every school library should teach this!
Kris Atkinson's curator insight, May 14, 9:44 PM

This is a skill that people lack in the real world. Critical thinking can be difficult, People don't justify enough of their reasons so this tool can really help especially in Economics and Business where you need explain "why" but with more depth of when it that going to happened and "how". This will be useful for all students now and later in life. This cheat sheet is easy for students to read and simple is best. Really like this and will use this for my future teaching career.

Jeannette Delamoir's curator insight, May 21, 7:26 PM
Another great tool for strengthening students' critical thinking. (Thanks, Kris, that's two great sources from your selection!)
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Teachers' Guide to Computational Thinking - CodeBC

Teachers' Guide to Computational Thinking - CodeBC | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
A BC Teacher’s Guide to Computational Thinking will provide an introduction and overview to computational thinking and help you identify areas where computational thinking already exists within your curriculum.

This course will take approximately 1 hour to complete.

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Redefining Failure in the classroom by Ben Johnson

Redefining Failure in the classroom by Ben Johnson | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 22, 6:48 PM
"Why encouraging students to get everything right is the wrong direction." It is. When we did not get the right answers, I asked students what might have happened to lead to the "failure?" Having students and teachers explore those questions can be quite fruitful.
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, April 23, 9:46 PM
A very interesting twist on the growth mindset. What do you think?
Helena Fonseca's curator insight, May 1, 8:48 AM
"I believe that truly embracing failure in our classrooms is an antidote to shallow learning. For example, students in difficult math classes in Helsinki, Finland, are expected to fail horribly at first, and the students and teachers don’t freak out about it. The students are given time and support to learn from their mistakes and make corrections. They understand that always getting the problem right or getting it right from the very start is not akin to living in the real world."
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27 Classroom Whiteboard Sketches That Prove Teachers Are the Best - WeAreTeachers

27 Classroom Whiteboard Sketches That Prove Teachers Are the Best - WeAreTeachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
27 Classroom Whiteboard Sketches That Prove Teachers Are the Best

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Digital Storytelling Wheel for Teachers

Digital Storytelling Wheel for Teachers | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
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Via Saturn's curator insight, May 13, 8:18 PM
This site contains some new tools to assist in digital storytelling. I found learning through narrative a common theme while researching supportive learning environments. Personally, I can recall several stories from my history lessons over any facts or figures.
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Today's Teaching Force Is Larger, Less Experienced, More Diverse Than Ever

Today's Teaching Force Is Larger, Less Experienced, More Diverse Than Ever | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Over the past 25 years, the U.S. teacher workforce has grown larger, less experienced, and more diverse. But according to a new report, these changes have not affected all types of teachers and schools equally. 

The report by Richard Ingersoll, a professor of education and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, and Lisa Merrill of New York University's Research Alliance for New York City Schools, an organization that studies the local education scene, used the Schools and Staffing Survey to analyze changes in the elementary and secondary teaching force from 1987 to 2012. The Schools and Staffing Survey includes information on teachers' backgrounds, qualifications, and work locations. Key findings fall into several categories:

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Poetry Writing Made Fun: 10 Cool Teaching Ideas by CHERYL MIZERNY

Poetry Writing Made Fun: 10 Cool Teaching Ideas by CHERYL MIZERNY | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
BY CHERYL MIZERNY

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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The Teenage Brain Is Wired to Learn—So Make Sure Your Students Know It

The Teenage Brain Is Wired to Learn—So Make Sure Your Students Know It | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it

Thanks to the wonders of neuroplasticity, adolescents are primed to improve their performance in school—and beyond. Here’s how to help.


Adolescence is an exciting time as teenagers become increasingly independent, begin to look forward to their lives beyond high school, and undergo many physical, emotional, and cognitive changes. In that last category, teenagers can learn to take charge of their developing brains and steer their thinking in positive and productive directions toward future college and career success.


Via Elizabeth E Charles
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Karina Ellemberger's curator insight, April 10, 9:15 AM
Share your insight
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 10, 1:38 PM
This makes sense. After infancy, adolescence from about 11 to 23 years, depending on the person, is the second most significant time for learning.
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A List of 26 Gratitude Exercises, Activities, Worksheets, Games, and Ideas

A List of 26 Gratitude Exercises, Activities, Worksheets, Games, and Ideas | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
Use this list of 26 gratitude exercises to develop your own gratitude practice or use these worksheets to teach others about the science of happiness!

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The Big List of Board Games that Inspire Mathematical Thinking

The Big List of Board Games that Inspire Mathematical Thinking | Purposeful Pedagogy | Scoop.it
These board games incorporate math in unique and fun ways!

Via Chris Carter, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, diane gusa, Ines Bieler
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Chris Carter's curator insight, April 4, 7:05 PM
Maths come in many forms. Why not choose the forms that interest the most kids?
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 10, 1:42 PM
When I taught, students enjoyed board and card games. They provided opportunities to develop strategies, learn, and form social skills. I am not familiar with the games on the list, but I imagine they would provide similar learning opportunities.
Kris Atkinson's curator insight, May 14, 9:45 PM
This could make learning fun as many students can struggle with maths so this is another way to work.